KCRW's Second Opinion An examination of medical ethics and the practioners who define them. Dr. Michael Wilkes is a Professor of Medicine and Vice Dean for Medical Education at UC Davis. He takes on the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and raises the issues that people face head-on when making medical decisions.
KCRW's Second Opinion

KCRW's Second Opinion

From KCRW

An examination of medical ethics and the practioners who define them. Dr. Michael Wilkes is a Professor of Medicine and Vice Dean for Medical Education at UC Davis. He takes on the pharmaceutical and health insurance industries and raises the issues that people face head-on when making medical decisions.

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How is advice to loose weight received from a clinician who is themselves overweight?

Lessons from 9-11

We have learned some important lessons about caring for people from 9-11 we can apply to those impacted by COVID.

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At this point, surgical robots are not all they are cracked up to be.

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Defensive medicine add costs but not value to clinical care.

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While the MRI can be enormously useful for a small number of people with back pain, when overused for common back pain it can lead to some serious problems.

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Bandura, one of the top five psychologists of all time challenged our approach to learning and changing human behavior.

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Loneliness is everywhere and seems to be growing more common. The treatment isn't medication but social connections.

After a diagnosis of lung cancer

Are there benefits of stopping smoking once diagnosed with lung cancer?

Do people have an ethical right to have cosmetic surgery?

Government insurance is provided to people for medically necessary care. But, when care is not necessary should it still be provided as a benefit?