Studio 360 With Kurt Andersen The Peabody Award-winning Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, from PRI, is a smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt introduces the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy – so let Studio 360 steer you to the must-see movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life. Produced in association with Slate.
Studio 360 With Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 With Kurt Andersen

From PRI

The Peabody Award-winning Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, from PRI, is a smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt introduces the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy – so let Studio 360 steer you to the must-see movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life. Produced in association with Slate.

Most Recent Episodes

The Spektor of performing on Broadway

Singer-songwriter Regina Spektor talks with Kurt Andersen about her upcoming Broadway residency and, seated at a Steinway, performs some songs. The story behind the Empire Zinc strike 70 years ago and the film it inspired, "Salt of the Earth." And how one scene from "Finding Nemo" inspired Kiki Kienstra to up and move to Mexico. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Extra: Deadwood Creator David Milch on Swearing and Swearengen

To commemorate Deadwood and its long-awaited conclusion, Kurt Andersen revisits his 2006 conversation with the show's creator, David Milch. They discuss the show's reprobate cast of characters and their florid, profane dialogue. "I did a lot of research," Milch says. "Everyone without exception said that in the mining camps, the language was of an unrelieved coarseness and obscenity." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

'Booksmart' besties, and 'Ishtar' reconsidered

In 1987 Elaine May's comedy "Ishtar" was savaged by critics and flopped spectacularly, but it turns out that the movie is actually pretty funny — and the reason it failed is pretty complicated. Beanie Feldstein and Kaitlyn Dever, the stars of "Booksmart," tell Kurt Andersen about how they became friends after they were cast as friends — and they bring a playlist of some of their favorite on-screen friendships. The final episode of the original "Star Trek" series aired 50 years ago this week, and Ronald D. Moore reveals how watching reruns of the show made him a science-fiction fan and ultimately led to becoming staff writer for "Star Trek: The Next Generation," and, in a movie for the franchise, to killing off his hero, James T. Kirk. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American Icons: '2001: A Space Odyssey' — Part Two

A half century later, Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" is still shaping our future. With no help from CGI, the movie predicted private space travel, artificial intelligence and much of Apple's product line. It showed the promise and perils of technology and explored life's biggest mystery: Are we alone in the universe? In Part Two of our look at the movie in our American Icons series, we visit the same IBM research lab that helped inspire HAL. We meet CIMON, a real-life AI robot on the International Space Station and Garrett Reisman, a former NASA astronaut who blasted the "Blue Danube" in the space shuttle. Plus we speak to New York Times critic Wesley Morris, filmmakers Christopher Nolan and Tom Hanks, artist James Turrell and U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

How the Stars of Booksmart Became Best Friends to Portray Best Friends

Booksmart is a new movie directed by Olivia Wilde, about two smart young women, Molly and Amy, who are best friends finishing at the top of their class because they spent high school doing homework and volunteering instead of partying so they could get into good colleges. Only to realize that their hard-partying classmates also got into those same good schools. Queue the wild, wacky, booze-fueled odyssey to get to the mega-party. But the depiction of the two girls and their friendship is not generic, but specific, and fresh, and believable. The stars, Beanie Feldstein (Lady Bird) and Kaitlyn Dever (Justified), talk with Kurt Andersen about stereotypes, role models, and how they decided to become roommates before shooting the film and actually became friends before portraying them. They also share their favorite on-screen friendships that inspired the enchanting bond between their characters. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Drama club

Theater magic, starting with "Tootsie" composer David Yazbek and musical theater obsessive John McWhorter on the art and wonder of tongue-twisting patter songs. Kurt Andersen talks with performance artist Taylor Mac on writing the new Broadway play, "Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus." And the odd mixture of religious fervor, class concerns and gender politics that made performing Shakespeare outdoors so popular in the United States. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Woman's Work: Billie Holiday's Lady Sings the Blues

This Woman's Work is a series of stories from Classic Album Sundays and Studio 360, highlighting classic albums by female artists that have made a lasting impact on music and pop culture. This time, we focus on Lady Sings the Blues by legendary jazz singer Billie Holiday. It was released in 1956 to coincide with her autobiography of the same name. By this point in her career, when she was just in her early 40s, Holiday's voice had taken on a fragile and worn quality. Hardship, abusive relationships, and addiction had taken their toll on her famous instrument. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Why Werner Herzog loves cat videos

Kurt Andersen talks with filmmaker Werner Herzog about his latest documentary, "Meeting Gorbachev," his unusual approach to narrating documentaries and their mutual obsession with cat videos. One of the busiest directors of TV comedy, Beth McCarthy-Miller, tells Kurt how she has gone about directing "SNL," sitcoms and that notorious Super Bowl halftime show that popularized the term "wardrobe malfunction." And 35 years ago, Prince went from a popular musician to a phenomenon, with the release of "When Doves Cry," and the movie he wrote it for, "Purple Rain." Two members of Prince's band, Wendy Melvoin and Matt "Doctor" Fink, as well as music journalist and author Alan Light, tell the story of that remarkable song. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

John Cameron Mitchell's Genre-Defying Podcast Musical

In Anthem: Homunculus, John Cameron Mitchell and composer Bryan Weller have taken the podcast musical to new heights. They join Kurt to discuss the shows origins, and perform a song live in our studio. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

American Icons: '2001: A Space Odyssey' — Part One

A half century later, Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" is still shaping our future. With no help from CGI, the movie predicted private space travel, artificial intelligence and half of Apple's product line. It showed the promise and perils of technology and explored life's biggest mystery: Are we alone in the universe? In Part One, we look at the movie's origins in 1960s New York and how it went from opening night bomb to counterculture icon. We'll hear from effects wizard Doug Trumbull, actor Keir Dullea and superfan Tom Hanks, who has seen the movie more than 200 times. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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