Studio 360 With Kurt Andersen The Peabody Award-winning Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, from PRI, is a smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt introduces the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy – so let Studio 360 steer you to the must-see movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life. Produced in association with Slate.
Studio 360 With Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 With Kurt Andersen

From PRI

The Peabody Award-winning Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, from PRI, is a smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt introduces the people who are creating and shaping our culture. Life is busy – so let Studio 360 steer you to the must-see movie this weekend, the next book for your nightstand, or the song that will change your life. Produced in association with Slate.More from Studio 360 With Kurt Andersen »

Most Recent Episodes

The mother of all abstraction

Thanks to a new exhibit at the Guggenheim, the art world is rediscovering Hilma af Klint. How was this Swede so ahead of her time, and will she finally get her due? Lee Israel's memoir about forging letters by famous writers, "Can You Ever Forgive Me?," is now a terrific movie starring Melissa McCarthy. Israel died in 2014, but here she is in an interview with Kurt Andersen in 2008, where she talks about how — and why — she decided to start impersonating the likes of Dorothy Parker and Noël Coward. When Shane McCrae was a depressed teen in the '90s, he found inspiration and hope in the strangest of places: the poetry of the famously tragic Sylvia Plath.

Digging into 'Doug'

The story of "Doug," the Nickelodeon cartoon from the '90s that used a minimalist approach but had a profound impact on young viewers. Kurt Andersen talks with Rina Banerjee, who makes enchanting installations and who is the subject of a retrospective show at just 55. And the breathtaking backstory and staging for "The Jungle," the play that replicates an Afghan restaurant in a migrant camp. This episode is brought to you by Doctors Without Borders. Donate today at doctorswithoutborders.org.

Tales from the Script

John August, the host of Scriptnotes, explains his approach to screenwriting.

Best of 2018, part 2

Some of our favorite stories from the past year. First, Kurt Andersen speaks with Daniela Vega, who delivered a stunning performance in "A Fantastic Woman." Casey Trela is a musician in Los Angeles with a Kafkaesque day job: he watches movies and TV shows over and over and over again looking for the tiniest production glitches. Lauren Groff has a complicated relationship with her adopted state, and nowhere is that more evident than in her recent short story collection, "Florida." And an oral history of how, in '90s New York, hip-hop pirate radio station WBAD rose — and fell. This episode is brought to you by Doctors Without Borders. Donate today at doctorswithoutborders.org.

Best of 2018, part 1

Some of our favorite stories from the past year. First, the musical equivalent to stock art, library music, where composers anonymously churned out some of the strangest, funkiest — and most recognizable — music of the '60s, '70s and '80s. The Domino's Pizza mascot, The Noid, was just a whimsical advertising mascot — until it became part of a really dark story. And Kurt Andersen talks with Angélique Kidjo, a superstar of African music, about her recent album: a song-by-song cover of the 1980 Talking Heads classic "Remain in Light."

Welcome to The Jungle

Here in America, despite the hysteria whipped up in the weeks leading up to the November midterm elections, there was no influx of migrants from the south. In other words, nothing like what happened a few years ago, when hundreds of thousands refugees from the Middle East, Central Asia, and Africa arrived in Europe. There's a new play about that migrant crisis called The Jungle — which was the nickname of the notorious migrant camp in Calais, France.

A movie hallmark, and Hallmark movies

An American Icons segment about "The Searchers," John Ford's problematic masterpiece featuring John Wayne. Kurt Andersen talks with Carol Stabile about an aspect of the Red Scare that's received scant attention: the 41 women who were blacklisted from radio and television. And how Mariame Kaba, a prison activist who's black and Muslim, falls hard for something very white and very Christian: Hallmark Christmas movies. This episode is brought to you by Helix, a new kind of DNA testing. Try today for a deep discount at helix.com/studio360.

Art that grows on you

The stuff you love as kids — that still deserve love when you're grown up. Kurt Andersen talks with author Bruce Handy about how the best children's literature can still enthrall adults — and then Bruce's and Kurt's kids join them to weigh in. Jim Henson always thought of his creations, the Muppets, as adult entertainment, but thanks to "Sesame Street," they ended up being beloved by kids. And finally Kurt talks with design critic Alexandra Lange about the history of playgrounds — and how lawyers and bureaucrats have ruined fun. This episode is brought to you by the following advertisers: American Express. Don't do business without it. Helix, a new kind of DNA testing. Try today for a deep discount at helix.com/studio360.

Can You Ever Forgive Lee Israel?

Lee Israel's memoir, "Can You Ever Forgive Me?" tells the story of her years forging letters by famous writers like Dorothy Parker and Noel Coward. Her book has recently been adapted into a new film starring Melissa McCarthy as Israel. Kurt Andersen interviewed the real Lee Israel in 2008, and with the film adaption now in theaters, he revisits his conversation with the literary con artist.

Unhung heroes

Why is contemporary culture obsessed with how well-endowed men are and yet in classical art men are so small? Kurt Andersen unravels the mystery with a classics scholar, Andrew Lear. Stacey Rose is a playwright, but when she's not working to take audiences' breath away on stage, she's doing the opposite in her day job: she's a respiratory therapist. And finally, a Studio 360 holiday tradition in the making — a Christmas-themed radio drama based on a short story by Kurt Andersen. This episode is brought to you by the following advertisers: LinkedIn Talent Solutions. For $50 off your first job post, go to linkedin.com/STUDIO360. American Express. Don't do business without it. Helix, a new kind of DNA testing. Try today for a deep discount at helix.com/studio360.

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