Fresh Air Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
Fresh Air

Fresh Air

From NPR

Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.More from Fresh Air »

Most Recent Episodes

Best Of: John Prine / Author Stephen McCauley

Singer, songwriter and guitarist John Prine underwent surgeries in 1996 and 2013 that affected his throat and voice. Now, he says, he likes his voice better: "It dropped down lower and feels friendlier." His new album, 'The Tree of Forgiveness,' is his first in 13 years. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new Elvis documentary 'The King.' Stephen McCauley's latest book, 'My Ex-Life,' is a comedy about a couple whose marriage ended years ago when the husband came out as gay, but then they become friends. "All relationships evolve — even for people who stay together," he says.

Best Of: John Prine / Author Stephen McCauley

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The U.S. Gov't's Secret Plan To Save Itself (While The Rest Of Us Die)

In 'Raven Rock,' Garrett Graff describes the bunkers designed to protect U.S. leaders in the event of a catastrophe. One Cold War-era plan put the post office in charge of cataloging the dead. His book is now out in paperback. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new Elvis documentary 'The King.'

The U.S. Gov't's Secret Plan To Save Itself (While The Rest Of Us Die)

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Inside America's First Family

'Vanity Fair' journalist Emily Jane Fox focused on Trump's three marriages and five children when writing her new book, 'Born Trump.' "His presence is overwhelming," she says of the president's role in the family. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews two books that celebrate road trips, 'Don't Make Me Pull Over!' and 'Main-Travelled Roads.'

Inside America's First Family

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Novelist Stephen McCauley

McCauley's latest book, 'My Ex-Life,' is a comedy about a couple whose marriage ended years ago when the husband came out as gay, but then they become friends. "All relationships evolve — even for people who stay together," he says. Also, John Powers reviews two novels about unconventional women, 'Mirror, Shoulder, Signal,' and 'Convenience Store Woman.'

Novelist Stephen McCauley

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'War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age'

'New York Times' national security correspondent David Sanger says U.S. officials worry that foreign powers have planted malware that could take down critical infrastructure, including the electric power grid and cell phone systems. Sanger's new book is 'The Perfect Weapon.' Also, rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the new Father John Misty record, 'God's Favorite Customer.'

'War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age'

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John Prine

The singer, songwriter and guitarist underwent surgeries in 1996 and 2013 that affected his throat and voice. Now, he says, he likes his voice better: "It dropped down lower and feels friendlier." His new album, 'The Tree of Forgiveness,' is his first in 13 years. Also, book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'There There,' a debut novel from Tommy Orange.

John Prine

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Best Of: Ethan Hawke & Paul Schrader / Michael Chabon

Schrader wrote and directed the new film 'First Reformed,' which stars Hawke as a pastor having a crisis of faith. Schrader also wrote 'Taxi Driver' and 'Raging Bull. He considers his new film to be his first spiritual film. Also, critic Justin Chang reviews the new Pixar movie 'Incredibles 2.' Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon writes about his relationship with his father, as well as his own experiences as the parent of four, in 'Pops: Fatherhood in Pieces.'

Best Of: Ethan Hawke & Paul Schrader / Michael Chabon

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'Quest' Follows A North Philly Family For 8 Years

Filmmaker Jonathan Olshefski spent nearly 10 years filming Christopher Rainey and his family, who run a recording studio in a working-class African-American neighborhood of North Philadelphia. During the course of the film we see the Raineys get married, raise their daughter, and try to recover from a traumatic turn of events when she is hit by a stray bullet. Olshefski and Christopher "Quest" Rainey talk about the film. Also we remember war photographer David Douglas Duncan and Elvis Presley's drummer D.J. Fontana.

'Quest' Follows A North Philly Family For 8 Years

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Remembering Feminist Scholar Jill Ker Conway

Conway, a women's history scholar and the first female president of Smith College, died June 1. She grew up on a remote Australian sheep farm and later went on to write three memoirs. She fought for women's equality in education and in the workplace, and insisted on equality in her marriage. Also, Ken Tucker reviews the album 'Lush' by Snail Mail, and Justin Chang reviews 'Incredibles 2.'

Remembering Feminist Scholar Jill Ker Conway

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'Black Athletes, A Divided America, And The Politics Of Patriotism'

As some athletes kneel for the national anthem to protest racial injustice, and others decline to visit the White House after championships, journalist Howard Bryant discusses the history of social protest among African-American athletes. His new book, 'The Heritage,' traces the tradition back to Jackie Robinson, Muhammad Ali, and others. Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews a new album by pianist Shamie Royston.

'Black Athletes, A Divided America, And The Politics Of Patriotism'

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