Breakthroughs In Heart Health

Dr. Haider Warraich talks about advancements in treating and preventing heart failure, and explains how the understanding of healthy blood pressure and good cholesterol continues to evolve. His book is 'State of the Heart.'

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Hulu revival of 'Veronica Mars,' starring Kristen Bell.

Breakthroughs In Heart Health

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Best Of: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum / Satirist Randy Rainbow

Emily Nussbaum, Pulitzer Prize-winning TV critic for 'The New Yorker,' talks about the art of "terrible men" in the #MeToo era and TV's revolution (from low brow to high art). Her new book of essays and reviews is 'I Like to Watch.'

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Copperhead' by Alexi Zentner.

Randy Rainbow writes and performs satirical songs about President Trump set to melodies of show tunes. "I always considered song parody kind of cheap," the Emmy-nominated performer says. "But ... I've gotten [such a] response from others ... that I'm appreciating it as an art form."

Best Of: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum / Satirist Randy Rainbow

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50th Anniversary Of The Moon Landing

For the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, we're listening back to archival interviews with Michael Collins, who circled the moon in the command capsule while Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong were on the moon's surface; Alan Shepard, the first American in space; Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield; and test pilot Chuck Yeager, the first to break the sound barrier.

50th Anniversary Of The Moon Landing

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Corruption & Dysfunction In The Border Protection Agency

When Customs and Border Protection was formed after 9/11 (as a part of the Department of Homeland Security), many agents signed up for the job thinking it would be a quasi-military position, focused on catching terrorists and stopping drug smugglers. Journalist Garrett Graff says in recent years, the border patrol agents mostly have been doing humanitarian and administrative work for asylum-seekers. "It went out and built its ranks by recruiting Rambo, when it actually turns out that what the border patrol needs is Mother Teresa," he says. Graff talks about the leadership vacuum that's plagued the agency and worsened the border crisis.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new remake of 'The Lion King.'

Corruption & Dysfunction In The Border Protection Agency

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Satirist Randy Rainbow

Rainbow writes and performs satirical songs about President Trump set to melodies of show tunes. "I always considered song parody kind of cheap," the Emmy-nominated performer says. "But ... I've gotten [such a] response from others ... that I'm appreciating it as an art form."

Also, we remember retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who died yesterday at 99. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2011.

Satirist Randy Rainbow

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Novelist Colson Whitehead On 'The Nickel Boys'

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist's new book, 'The Nickel Boys,' is based on the true story of a notorious Florida reform school where many boys were beaten and sexually abused. Dozens of unmarked graves were discovered on the school grounds, which the state shut down in 2011. Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel, and then the author speaks with contributor Dave Davies.

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the book 'Jazz from Detroit.'

Novelist Colson Whitehead On 'The Nickel Boys'

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TV Critic Emily Nussbaum

The Pulitzer Prize-winning TV critic for 'The New Yorker' talks about the art of "terrible men" in the #MeToo era, TV's revolution (from low to high brow), and what she calls "the bad fan." Her new book of essays and reviews is 'I Like to Watch.'

TV Critic Emily Nussbaum

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Best Of: Yiddish 'Fiddler On The Roof' / How 'Maiden' Sailed Into History

A new Yiddish language production of 'Fiddler on the Roof' is currently running off-Broadway. Steven Skybell, who plays Tevye, and Joel Grey, who directs the show, explain why the play still resonates.

Film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller 'Midsommar.'

In 1989, 26-year-old skipper Tracy Edwards set out on what was considered an unthinkable journey for a woman — to sail the 33,000 mile Whitbread Round The World Race. She assembled an all-female crew, restored a shabby racing yacht, and took to sea. The new documentary 'Maiden' tracks their 9-month-long race and the sexism they faced at every turn. Edwards spoke with 'Fresh Air' contributor Dave Davies.

Best Of: Yiddish 'Fiddler On The Roof' / How 'Maiden' Sailed Into History

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MLB's Keith Hernandez / Remembering Pitcher Jim Bouton & Actor Rip Torn

The former first baseman played on championship teams with the Cardinals and Mets, and made a memorable appearance on 'Seinfeld.' His memoir, now out in paperback, is 'I'm Keith Hernandez.'

MLB pitcher Jim Bouton, who died Wednesday, spoke to 'Fresh Air' in 1986 about his 1970 tell-all memoir, 'Ball Four,' in which he drew on his seven years with the Yankees to offer an insider's guide to baseball.

Actor Rip Torn, who died Tuesday, won an Emmy Award for playing the gruff producer Artie on 'The Larry Sanders Show.' In 1994, he told Terry Gross that he based his character on Johnny Carson's long time producer.

Also, critic John Powers reviews 'London Kills,' about a Scotland Yard team led by a detective whose wife has gone missing.

MLB's Keith Hernandez / Remembering Pitcher Jim Bouton & Actor Rip Torn

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The Ongoing Crisis At The U.S.-Mexico Border

NY Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson has been documenting the impact of the Trump administration's policies on migrants — and on the workers who deal with the large number of people held in detention. Dickerson talks about the squalid conditions at the Clint, Texas, border patrol center, where toddlers were living for weeks without diapers, and kids were living in cold, crowded holding areas without showers, clean clothes, toothbrushes, or enough food.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'The Farewell,' starring Awkwafina.

The Ongoing Crisis At The U.S.-Mexico Border

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Yiddish 'Fiddler On The Roof'

A new, Yiddish language production of the musical is currently running off-Broadway. Steven Skybell, who plays Tevye, and Joel Grey, who directs the show, explain why the play still resonates.

Yiddish 'Fiddler On The Roof'

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Gerrymandering, The 2020 Census & Voter Suppression

'Mother Jones' journalist Ari Berman says recent Supreme Court decisions on redistricting and the 2020 census will determine which party is in power in the next decade. Berman says while Americans are justifiably worried that Russia might try again to interfere in our 2020 election, we also need to also be focusing on homegrown threats to our democracy. "The Russians didn't invent voter suppression. The Russians didn't gut the Voting Rights Act. The Russians didn't draw heavily gerrymandered maps in the last redistricting cycle. The Russians didn't add a citizenship question to the 2020 census." Berman also explains how the gerrymandering decision and the citizenship question could determine the political future.

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Copperhead' by Alexi Zentner.

Gerrymandering, The 2020 Census & Voter Suppression

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A Bioethicist's Personal Struggle With Opioids

Travis Rieder became dependent on opioids after a motorcycle accident in 2015 that crushed his left foot, and forced him to endure six surgeries. His book 'In Pain' draws on his insights as a patient, and his subsequent research into pain medicine, to examine the larger problems and dilemmas surrounding prescription opioids and the larger opioid crisis.

A Bioethicist's Personal Struggle With Opioids

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Best Of: Sarah Jessica Parker / 'Leaving The Witness'

Parker is best-known for her role as the iconic single New Yorker Carrie Bradshaw on 'Sex and the City.' Now, on the HBO series 'Divorce,' she plays Frances, a woman navigating the dissolution of her marriage.

Also, Ken Tucker reviews two country hits that are challenging traditional notions of the genre, by Lil Nas X and Blanco Brown.

Amber Scorah was a third-generation Jehovah's Witness raised to believe that the Armageddon was imminent. Scorah talks about her decision to leave her marriage and her religion and start over. Her memoir is 'Leaving the Witness.'

Best Of: Sarah Jessica Parker / 'Leaving The Witness'

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Willie Nelson

At the age of 86, Nelson is still going strong. He's touring and has a new record, 'Ride Me Back Home.' We'll listen back to two interviews with Nelson and hear a review of the new album. When Terry Gross spoke to him in 1996 he told her why he had trouble fitting in to country music. "My songs had a few chords in them, and the country songs weren't supposed to have over three chords. My phrasing was sort of funny. I didn't sing on the beat. I just didn't fit the slots, you know? And I wouldn't take orders and so I became one of those guys that you know they had to call something else."

Willie Nelson

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Lizzo

The flute-playing pop star celebrates self-love on her latest album, 'Cuz I Love You.' About 10 years ago, "I made the decision that I just wanted to be happy with my body," she says. Lizzo talks to Terry Gross about collaborating with Prince, feminism, and using music to help people find a positive place within themselves.

[Originally broadcast In May 2019]

Lizzo

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Sarah Jessica Parker

Parker is best-known for her role as the iconic single New Yorker Carrie Bradshaw on 'Sex and the City.' Now, on the HBO series 'Divorce,' she plays Frances, a woman navigating the dissolution of her marriage. Parker spoke with Terry Gross about growing up poor but engaged in the arts, the #MeToo movement, and how she doesn't relate to Carrie (or the other 'SATC' characters) at all.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller 'Midsommar.'

Sarah Jessica Parker

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Uncovering The Story Of Chernobyl

HBO's recent series 'Chernobyl' has renewed public interest in the 1986 explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear plant. Journalist Adam Higginbotham has spent years investigating the causes of the accident and the dramatic efforts to contain the damage. He says design flaws, human hubris and Soviet secrecy all contributed to the disaster. His book is 'Midnight in Chernobyl.'

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews 'I'm All Smiles' by pianist George Cables.

Uncovering The Story Of Chernobyl

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From Nightmares To PTSD, The Toll On Facebook Moderators

'Verge' journalist Casey Newton investigated working conditions for the moderators who determine what material can be posted to Facebook. Many are traumatized by the images of hate and violence they see. "I've talked to folks who will wake up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat. They will have nightmares about the content that they saw, and eventually, many of them get diagnosed with PTSD." Newton also talks about how Facebook is starting what's been called a "supreme court" for contested content decisions, and we'll discuss what the social network is doing to prepare for the 2020 election.

Also, Ken Tucker reviews two country hits that are challenging traditional notions of the genre, by Lil Nas X and Blanco Brown.

From Nightmares To PTSD, The Toll On Facebook Moderators

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Best Of: Founders OF The 1st AIDS Ward / Comic Ramy Youssef

The new documentary '5B' tells the story of America's first hospital unit dedicated to the care of people with AIDS. Nurse Cliff Morrison helped create 5B in 1983, and worked on it with Dr. Paul Volberding. They talked with Terry Gross about the early years of the AIDS epidemic, and how they sought to give patients compassionate care through human touch when most medical workers wore full body suits because they were afraid they'd get infected.

Film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Yesterday' by 'Slumdog Millionaire' director Danny Boyle.

In the semi-autobiographical Hulu series 'Ramy,' Youssef plays a first generation Muslim American who follows some — but not all — of the rules of his religion. Youssef, whose parents immigrated from Egypt, also co-created the series. He says he can relate to his character's "picking and choosing" approach to his faith. "Sometimes we would call it 'Allah carte,'" he says.

Best Of: Founders OF The 1st AIDS Ward / Comic Ramy Youssef

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Novelist John Green On OCD

Green's latest novel, 'Turtles All The Way Down,' is about a teenage girl with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. The author spoke with Terry Gross about his own experience with OCD in 2017. "It starts out with one little thought, and then slowly that becomes the only thought that you're able to have. It's like there's an invasive weed that just spreads out of control."

Also, linguist Geoff Nunberg considers how the word "algorithm" has come to stand in for the power that technology wields in our life. And TV critic David Bianculli reviews the Showtime mini-series 'The Loudest Voice' about Fox News creator, Roger Ailes.

Novelist John Green On OCD

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How An All-Female Crew Sailed Round The World & Into The History Books

In 1989, 26-year-old skipper Tracy Edwards set out on what was thought of as an unthinkable journey for a woman — to sail the 33,000 mile Whitbread Round The World Race. She assembled an all-female crew, restored a shabby racing yacht, and took to sea. The new documentary 'Maiden' tracks their 9-month-long race and the sexism they faced at every turn. Edwards spoke with 'Fresh Air' contributor Dave Davies.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews 'Yesterday,' by 'Slumdog Millionaire' director Danny Boyle.

How An All-Female Crew Sailed Round The World & Into The History Books

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Founders Of The 1st AIDS Ward

The new documentary '5B' tells the story of America's first hospital unit dedicated to the care of people with AIDS. Nurse Cliff Morrison helped create 5B in 1983, and worked on it with Dr. Paul Volberding. They talked with Terry Gross about the early years of the AIDS epidemic, how they sought to give patients compassionate care, and the rampant homophobia at the time.

Founders Of The 1st AIDS Ward

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Comic Ramy Youssef

In the semi-autobiographical Hulu series 'Ramy,' Youssef plays a first generation Muslim American who follows some — but not all — of the rules of his religion. Youssef, whose parents immigrated from Egypt, also co-created the series. He says he can relate to his character's "picking and choosing" approach to his faith. "Sometimes we would call it 'Allah carte,'" he says. Youssef talks with Terry Gross about the series, feeling torn between wanting to fit in and his faith, and his stand-up comedy.

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel 'Ask Again, Yes' by Mary Beth Keane, which she describes as "profound, yet unpretentious."

Comic Ramy Youssef

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