The Jefferson Exchange This lively two-hour interactive program devoted to issues facing the State of Jefferson, the Northwest, the nation and the world.
The Jefferson Exchange

The Jefferson Exchange

From Jefferson Public Radio

This lively two-hour interactive program devoted to issues facing the State of Jefferson, the Northwest, the nation and the world.

Most Recent Episodes

Forget the calories, think about the 'Barons' in your food

Maybe it's not something you think about when you're shopping for food, but there is a great concentration of money and power in the food industry in the United States. And that's true of the ENTIRE food chain, from the farm to the grocery stores. How did we get here, and what are the implications for what we choose to put in our bodies? Austin Frerick, an expert in both agricultural and antitrust policy, shows the timeline in his book Barons: Money, Power, and the Corruption of America's Food Industry. From the farm to your fork, there are many big players that get involved. The author visits the JX to lay out the story.

Common Ground Conversations: Gina DuQuenne on why people vote the way they do

Black and White women voters are aligned on many societal concerns and key issues, yet a majority consistently vote polar opposite, along racial lines, in each election cycle. Common Ground Conversations is exploring the reasons why in this series with host Mike Green. In this episode, community leader and Ashland City Councilor Gina Duquenne offers her perspective from the viewpoint of a Black woman community activist.

Common Ground Conversations: Gina DuQuenne on why people vote the way they do

Common Ground Conversations: Gina DuQuenne on why people vote the way they do

Black and White women voters are aligned on many societal concerns and key issues, yet a majority consistently vote polar opposite, along racial lines, in each election cycle. Common Ground Conversations is exploring the reasons why in this series with host Mike Green. In this episode, community leader and Ashland City Councilor Gina Duquenne offers her perspective from the viewpoint of a Black woman community activist.

Common Ground Conversations: Gina DuQuenne on why people vote the way they do

Analysis of the analysis: The week's news, revisited

California allocated 2,800 acres of land to the Shasta Indian Nation. The Shasta County Board of Supervisors hired a former deputy district attorney as its new county clerk. And a wildfire map now categorizes some communities in Jackson County as "high hazard." That's among the stories JPR News covered in the week spring slides into summer. There's plenty more going on, including a hike in fire danger as temperatures climb. JPR News Director Erik Neumann assembles the reporting staff for a new lookback, in The Debrief.

June is busting out all over, and gardeners need to be ready

Summer is here, and things should be growing in area gardens, growing like gangbusters. Except there are a few things that might get in the way: It might get very hot very fast, which was a feature of early June. And even when the plants are not very active, the bugs sure can be. We take up these and other early-summer gardening issues in a new edition of Garden For Life. Grace Florjancic, who coordinates the Master Gardener program in Jackson County, returns for more answers to our questions about how to make things grow well, and what to do when they don't.

Microbes + time + practice + books = fermentistas

Maybe you don't like sauerkraut much, and figured that means you don't much like fermented foods. You could well be wrong about that, since bread and beer and wine and even coffee go through some fermentation. Kirsten and Christopher Shockey from the Applegate Valley have long sung the praises of fermented foods, calling themselves "fermentistas." In the latest edition of Savor, our food segment, food stylist and host Will Smith visits with the Shockeys anew. The occasion: The tenth-anniversary printing of their book Fermented Vegetables, which has been translated into six languages. The Shockeys share their thoughts on where they've been, and where fermentation is going.

The financial reasons for an Oregon newspaper chain cutting services and jobs

June 4th could be called Black Monday in Oregon journalism. That's the day two chains owning multiple newspapers across the state announced changes, and not the kind companies are proud to announce. Pamplin Media Group in Portland announced the sale of its entire collection of newspapers to a Mississippi company, and company operators said they expected some "belt tightening." The story goes beyond tightening to actual cutting at EO Media, which owns the Rogue Valley Times and other newspapers across Oregon. All of them will be reducing print frequency, and 28 layoffs are expected, with the company potentially up for sale. Heidi Wright, Publisher and CEO at The Bulletin in Bend, EO's flagship, visits the JX with details of the plans and the reasons for them.

The financial reasons for an Oregon newspaper chain cutting services and jobs

Amateur (aka "ham") radio thrives in Oregon in Internet age

The Internet, and social media particularly, made it easy for anyone with a web connection to talk to the entire world. Kind of like what local terrestrial broadcasters do, but with a potentially much greater reach. Somehow, broadcasting has survived, both the professional and the amateur kind. Amateur radio operators--it's okay to call it "ham radio"--are still numerous, with 20,000 or so hams in Oregon alone. They practice communicating with each other, in emergencies and not, and get to celebrate Amateur Radio Week in Oregon this week. A big Field Day exercise over the weekend caps the celebration. We talk to Oregon hams Charlie Boening (K7AKT) and Cyndi Albro (KK7AZD) about their work.

Ashland group unveils opera-on-film story of Latino life in Rogue Valley

Ashland-based Anima Mundi Productions has gained a reputation for staging new, original operas based on the stories of real people. The latest work from AMP goes a step further, coming out as an opera on film. Dreams Have No Borders is a story of Latino immigrant families in the Rogue Valley, fictionalized but based on interviews with real people and the circumstances--like the Almeda fire--they have encountered. It is sung in English and Spanish and shot on stages in the Rogue Valley, and it premieres at Ashland's Varsity Theatre on Saturday (June 22nd). We get details on the creation of "Dreams" from AMP co-producers Ethan Gans-Morse and Tiziana DellaRovere, with Virginia Camberos from Unite Oregon, the social justice group.

Ashland group unveils opera-on-film story of Latino life in Rogue Valley

Juneteenth special: What it means to be Black depends upon place

(Sharona Jacobs) Juneteenth finds the JX crew taking the holiday, and we devote today's program to reflections on life in Black skin. Louis Chude Sokei is the guest, in an interview from 2021, talking about his amazing journey from child of celebrities in Biafra to the streets of Los Angeles--with Jamaica in between. He learned that "acting Black" means different things in different places, a story he tells in his book Floating In A Most Peculiar Way: A Memoir. Hear the details in this encore interview.