Us & Them Us & Them explores all sides of the cultural issues that too often divide us. Peabody Award-winner Trey Kay brings us stories that may make you rethink your opinions on religion, sexuality, and other important issues
Us & Them

Us & Them

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Us & Them explores all sides of the cultural issues that too often divide us. Peabody Award-winner Trey Kay brings us stories that may make you rethink your opinions on religion, sexuality, and other important issuesMore from Us & Them »

Most Recent Episodes

Under the Microscope: Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

Back in 2015, we aired an episode called "Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is" that didn't go over so well with a bunch of our listeners. We received messages saying that Trey mishandled a conversation between a physicist who defends climate science and a former public school teacher who's an evolution skeptic. With the hope of finding a better way around the culture war aspects of science debates, we're putting that episode (and ourselves) under the microscope.

EXTRA CUTS: My Friend From Camp

As promised, we are posting some additional segments from our last episode, My Friend From Camp that we just couldn't fit in. If you haven't heard that episode yet, by all means, head over to your Us and Them feed and have a listen to that one first. These segments will make a whole lot more sense once you've heard the full episode. Former Guantanamo detainee Moazzam Begg about the meaning of the term jihad. Former Guantanamo MP Albert Melise explains why he wanted to re-enlist and go back to the island. Andrea Pitzer, journalist and author of One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps, on whether or not she thinks the United States will ever face up to what was done at Guantanamo Bay and black sites around the world.

My Friend From Camp

Moazzam Begg, a British citizen of Pakistani heritage, and Albert Melise, a former housing police officer in the Boston area, were unlikely to have their life stories intersect and become friends; but then September 11 happened. After the Bush Administration launched the War on Terror, Begg was detained and held at the U.S. Detention Camp at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Melise was a Gitmo guard. You can't get much more Us & Them than that.

A Suburb of Hell

For a little more than a century, there's been at least one concentration camp somewhere on earth. The fact that camps still exist and that humans can justify forcing other humans into such inhumane living conditions is the "us and them" dynamic taken to the most vile extreme. For this episode, Trey interviews journalist Andrea Pitzer, author of One Long Night: A Global History of Concentration Camps. She says that the legacy of camps started in Cuba and continues there to this day.

The Black Talk

How old were you when you first learned that police may think of you as a threat? You've never been told that? Chances are you're not African American. In this episode, Trey Kay examines "The Black Talk," which is the sober conversation that many black families have with their teenage kids – particularly teenage boys – about how they should conduct themselves when stopped by the police. Spoiler alert: Black parents, like any parent, want their kids to come home alive.

The "Talk"

Despite all the fuss about sex education in America, students get precious little of it. Jonathan Zimmerman, an education historian, tells Trey how Americans spend more time arguing about what kids should learn about human sexuality in schools than they actually do teaching anything about it.

Trapped on the Turnpike

On Friday, January 22nd, 2016, I was in New York City preparing to head to West Virginia. So was a blizzard called Jonas. The blizzard that took the East Coast by storm hadn't hit by the time I rolled into in Harrisburg, PA. I was assured by meteorologists that I shouldn't try driving down I-79 to Charleston, but that I could make it to Pittsburgh without encountering snow. This podcast tracks my experience on the Pennsylvania Turnpike between the Bedford and Somerset exits, and the TWENTY-SEVEN AND A HALF hours I remained there, trapped in snow.

Panhandlers: To Give Or Not to Give?

What do you do when a panhandler hits you up for some money? Whatever your answer is, what experiences or facts inform your policy for giving or not giving? People have strong opinions on this. With this episode we try to separate the facts, suppositions and ideology.

A New Year, A Reprise, Amazing Grace

Everyone knows the song "Amazing Grace." People who don't even consider themselves spiritual or religious find it meaningful. And while John Newton penned the hymn to connect with Christians, it has transcended religion and become a folk song and an anthem for civil rights. But the origins of the song are just a bit more complicated...

Feminism Is The Word

Merriam-Webster declared that the word for 2017 is 'feminism.' The term was the most-looked-up on their online dictionary, and there were 70% more searches for the word this year than in 2016. Trey feels this couldn't be more timely because this year, he's seen women effecting a change in the balance of power in ways that he's never experienced before. In a way, he sees the whole thing like an earthquake that's been a long time in coming. He's trying to wrap his mind around what the New Year might hold for the sexual misconduct "tsunami" the earthquake has unleashed. To try to get a handle on all of this, Trey sits down with his friends Lauren Schiller of the *Inflection Point *podcast and Nancy Giles of the CBS Sunday Morning Show and The Giles Files podcast.

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