We Live Here We Live Here explores the issues of race, class and power that led to the emotional eruption in the wake of Michael Brown's shooting death in Ferguson. St. Louis Public Radio reporters Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley present podcasts, radio features, web stories and use social media for an in-depth exploration of how systemic racism impacts people as well as the well-being of our region and beyond.
We Live Here

We Live Here

From St. Louis Public Radio

We Live Here explores the issues of race, class and power that led to the emotional eruption in the wake of Michael Brown's shooting death in Ferguson. St. Louis Public Radio reporters Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley present podcasts, radio features, web stories and use social media for an in-depth exploration of how systemic racism impacts people as well as the well-being of our region and beyond.

Most Recent Episodes

We have new hosts!

We've got new hosts! We know it's a big change, but trust us, we care deeply about issues of race and class. And we want you to get to know us. In our introductory episode, members of the new team have an honest conversation on how race and class has affected their lives. Co-host and Producer Ashley Renee, a St. Louis native, dives into her first experience with racism as a child. Co-host and Producer Jia Lian tells us how she experienced racism from the perspective of an activist. Associate Producer Lauren Brown explains how racism showed up at her doorstep when she was a college student.

When progress meets backlash

Just before Thanksgiving, a housing crisis popped up in the infamous St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, Mo. The county housing authority had stepped in to demand repairs from a property management company officials deemed substandard and even dangerous. In other words, the system was doing what it was supposed to do: ensuring residents have a safe place to live. But the property company responded by threatening to kick out residents, and pointed blame at the housing authority and previous ownership. It's a mess. And in the middle are residents who are hustling to find safe housing during the coldest months of the year. The whole situation gets at the heart of what's happening around issues of race, class and housing in the St. Louis area. Because while some institutions are making legitimate changes, countless pitfalls remain on the path to progress.

Segregation solutions?

We've spent our entire year dissecting the intersection of race and housing. Which of course has meant taking a pretty critical look at the deeply destructive patterns of segregation in St. Louis. And listening this year, you might have thought to yourself: "Sheesh! they talk a lot about the problems." But that's not the full picture of what's going on right now in our region. There's a robust conversation — in some circles — about possible solutions. On this episode, we decided to listen to a man who has been leading a team of some of the smartest people in the region with the goal of dismantling divides and creating a new path forward.

House Party!

Hey ya'll! It's a been a long season. And it means so much to the WLH crew that you've hung with us all year as we dissect race, class and housing in one of the most segregated cities in these United States. Recently we invited about 150 of our friends over for a house party downstairs from our studios at St. Louis Public Radio. Conversations were had. New connections were made. Of course there were drinks. And it wouldn't be a WLH party without stories! Many of you have asked to hear more youth voices on the show. So, this time around Kameel and Tim handed over their mics, stepped off the stage and listened to some stellar youth storytellers from St. Louis. Enjoy! We sure did.

Gentrification at a Midwestern pace

The Grove neighborhood is in a part of St. Louis that has seen an uptick in new housing and business development. The changes have been a blessing and a curse. While many in the area welcome the investments, there are concerns that rising housing costs are pushing out longtime residents. On this episode, we listen to stories of those who live, work, worship and teach in the area about how they've seen the neighborhood change.

Trying to make a way for upward mobility

It's an open secret that the nation's housing voucher (section 8) program has its issues. And that glaringly, a program intended to give people choice often doesn't, because turns out, many landlords on the private market aren't rushing to participate and take housing subsidies, no matter that they're backed by Uncle Sam. In St. Louis, it leads to this data point: just 7 percent of housing voucher holders live in "high opportunity areas." But very quietly over the past year, a pilot program here — one of only a handful like it in the country — has been trying to change that

The present day of public housing's past

The specter of Pruitt-Igoe still looms over St. Louis. The massive 1950s era public housing complex suffered under disinvestment and bad public policy. Ultimately, officials literally blew the whole thing up. Since then, the focus of public housing has shifted to the Section 8 voucher program and smaller developments. Yet, the model of large public housing complexes is still very much alive today. From mice to mold, the problems facing St. Louis' aging public housing complexes is long. And there's not much funding to fix a backlog of issues. On this episode, we tell you what life is like for our neighbors living in two of the last remaining vestiges of St. Louis' public housing past.

Real estate Redemption

Segregation is systemic. We know that. But who powers these systems? People. In this episode, we zoom in on a group that holds immense power in guiding where people choose to live and raise families.Today's show is about real estate agents. And what happens when some try to make amends for their industry's past transgressions by focusing on a single St. Louis neighborhood.

Nuisance, or nonsense? (Part 4)

Rosetta Watson has won her fight against the city of Maplewood, Mo., which kicked her out of town after she generated too many calls to police while dealing with an abusive ex-boyfriend. Now what? We catch up with her, give her case some national context and chart out what may come next for the people challenging these nuisance and crime free laws.

Nuisance, or nonsense? (Part 3)

We're interrupting our normal storytelling podcast schedule for...some breaking news. Earlier this season we brought you the story of Rosetta Watson, a woman suing in federal court after she says she was kicked out of Maplewood, Mo. for calling police too many times for protection from an abusive ex-boyfriend. Two days ago we got a tip that Maplewood had settled with Ms. Watson, who is set to receive a six-figure settlement. And the town's city council voted to move forward with changes to their nuisance ordinance. On this episode bring you the latest news out of the leafy suburb of Maplewood.

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