We Live Here We Live Here explores the issues of race, class and power that led to the emotional eruption in the wake of Michael Brown's shooting death in Ferguson. St. Louis Public Radio reporters Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley, along with editor Shula Neuman, present podcasts, radio features, web stories and use social media for an in-depth exploration of how systemic racism impacts people as well as the well-being of our region and beyond.
We Live Here

We Live Here

From St. Louis Public Radio

We Live Here explores the issues of race, class and power that led to the emotional eruption in the wake of Michael Brown's shooting death in Ferguson. St. Louis Public Radio reporters Tim Lloyd and Kameel Stanley, along with editor Shula Neuman, present podcasts, radio features, web stories and use social media for an in-depth exploration of how systemic racism impacts people as well as the well-being of our region and beyond.More from We Live Here »

Most Recent Episodes

Paved Over Histories

Today's show is all about the g-word: Gentrification. Which we often think of as happening in urban centers. But for generations there's been a slow turnover as cities expanded into the suburbs and rural areas. That's the backstory of Brentwood Promenade, a relatively affluent mall about 15 minutes outside of city of St. Louis. For 90 years it was home to middle-class African American families centered around the Evens-Howard Fire Brick Company. Developers bought and demolished the neighborhood in 1997. All that's left now is a plaque near a liquor store in the back of the plaza. The story of Evans-Howard Place has been acted out countless times in St. Louis and across the rest of the country. If you're from around our region you might know about Mill Creek Valley, or Laclede Town, or Meacham Park. But on today's episode, we tell you about a historic African American community in west St. Louis County that's fighting to avoid the same fate. To hang on to its land, history and future. This is the story of Westland Acres.

Closed off in the Gateway City

Spend time in St. Louis' wealthy, old neighborhoods and you might notice something unusual. Amid all the splendor of ornate craftsmanship and tree-lined streets you'll often happen across thick, wrought iron gates. In fact the city helped put gated communities on the map in America. The developers of these early streets also crafted racial restrictive covenants, which would spread to suburbs in St. Louis and beyond. With the help of St. Louis preservationist Michael Allen, Kameel and Tim trace the legacy of gated communities to modern day. They find that while the mechanics have changed, the ideas and beliefs that helped build some of the first gated, private streets in the country are hardly a thing of the past.

The Segregation Myth-buster

A lot of people moan and groan about segregation as if it's a plight that magically fell out the sky. But that would be letting a lot of powerful people, policies an institutions of the hook. Because the truth is, America is segregated because it was designed to be, via a series of purposeful policies and government actions implemented in the past several decades. In this episode, hear Richard Rothstein, author of Color of Law, break it all down.

Housing Defenders

In a country where fair and affordable housing is becoming harder to hold onto each year, we profile the people who are standing in the gap: the lawyers. And we introduce you to Lee Camp, a young St. Louis attorney who stumbled upon a case that could level the playing field between tenants and landlords in Missouri — and his client Latasha Johnson, whose eviction story sits at the center.

Nuisance, or nonsense? (Part 2)

Last episode, you heard about serious allegations against officials in Maplewood, Mo. Housing advocates say public nuisance laws in the leafy suburb of St. Louis are being used against the poor, people of color and victims of domestic abuse. But in this episode, town officials push back and say there's nothing wrong with the way they determine who is and isn't a nuisance in their town. We also hear more about Rosetta Watson, the woman suing in federal court after she says she was kicked out of Maplewood for calling police too many times for protection from an abusive ex-boyfriend.

Nuisance, or nonsense? (Part 1)

Maplewood, Missouri. is a cozy little suburb at the border of St. Louis City. It has great schools, a cute downtown and one of the region's most celebrated breweries. But in the background, some housing advocates say the town's officials are turning public nuisance laws against people of color, the mentally ill and victim's of domestic abuse. In the first of a two-part episode, hosts Tim and Kameel kick of the podcast's fourth season by digging into these allegations and tell the story of a woman who was kicked out of Maplewood after cops came to her house too many times to deal with an abusive ex-boyfriend.

It's Season Four trailer, trailer, trailer time!

Tim and Kameel give you a preview of what is coming in show's fourth season, with an extra emphasis on the LIVE HERE part of We Live Here.

Bonus: Black Girl Magic Pt. 2

Tim and Kameel are working hard to make shows for the next season, but don't worry dear listeners, because it's bonus episode time! We're taking you allllll the way back to a little more than a year ago when we brought you an episode called "Black Girl Magic." Some of you diehards probably remember it, if not, scroll back in our feed and check it out. The episode is all about a big effort among business leaders in St. Louis to diversify the city's entrepreneurship scene. It turns out one young woman was listening, and the story of what she did next is pretty cool.

Bonus: Kehinde Wiley takes us to art church

It almost seemed like a too-good-to-be-true Black History Month gift: the unveiling of the super-cool official portrait of former president Barack Obama. This distinct image of Obama, which is unlike any other presidential portrait, immediately caused a cultural and artistic buzz. Even better for us, it happened to be by the mesmerizing Kehinde Wiley, an artist we had on the podcast in 2016 following a controversy at St. Louis' contemporary art museum. In that episode, titled "Museum Meltdown," Wiley spoke to us about the complicated intersection of race, representation and art. But there were a lot of thing we left on the cutting room floor. So, in this bonus episode, We Live Here cracks open its vault and shares never-before-heard parts of an interview with Wiley. He gets into the fascination people have with a black artist painting white bodies; a concept he calls "cultural policing;" and the impoliteness of exclusion.

Bonus: Out of the Ville Pt. 2

We miss you guys! We're hard at work getting shows ready for our fourth season, but we don't want to leave you hanging. So, we're dropping a little bonus content. Last year we collaborated with the very cool producers at Baltimore's Out of the Blocks podcast and brought you voices from the Ville, a historic black neighborhood in north St. Louis. This is the second show from that podcast mashup with some extra stories at the end.

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