"Making it Grow" Minutes One minute home and gardening tips from Amanda McNulty, the host of SCETV's Making It Grow, and a Clemson University Extension Agent.
"Making it Grow" Minutes

"Making it Grow" Minutes

From South Carolina Public Radio

One minute home and gardening tips from Amanda McNulty, the host of SCETV's Making It Grow, and a Clemson University Extension Agent.

Most Recent Episodes

Making It Grow Extra: Dr. Jim Faust on Floriculture

Clemson Extension Agent Amanda McNulty talks Clemson University Associate Professor Dr. Jim Faust about floriculture and other research projects he is working on in the Clemson Greenhouses.

Ogeechee Lime

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Although the AC Moore Herbarium list of South Carolina's plant distribution shows Ogeechee lime, Nyssa ogeche, as documented in only Jasper and Beaufort counties, there is a specimen growing at Moore Farms Botanical Garden in Lake City. It's obviously a female tree, which has mostly female flowers but also some perfect ones, as it produces fruits. Stan McKenzie, aka the Citrus Man, who lives in nearby Olanta, has

Honeydew Honey

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . If you like the pine resin flavored Greek wine retsina, I have a honey suggestion for you. At Honey Travelers Single Flower honey page, they talk about forest or honeydew honey. Honeydew is the substance that aphids excrete – it is the bane of many gardeners as it coats the surface of lower leaves this sweet substance upon which sooty mold grows. But in the fir and spruce forests of Europe, certain aphids feed mainly

Honey Varietals

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . I'm not very picky about honey although Maynard Door near Sumter gave me some special honey he didn't mix in with others as its flavor was so delightfully floral. Lots of people are honey aficionados and have their favorites for different purposes. There are even listings for honey varietals, just like wine! For example, the website Honey Travelers has information on a honey competition in the Mediterranean region.

Ogeechee Honey

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . If you look at the USC Herbarium's plant distribution list, you'll see that only in Jasper and Beaufort Counties has Ogeechee lime, Nyssa ogeche, been documented. It's greatest distribution is in a swath of Georgia and the upper panhandle of Florida. Bee keepers take hives into these sites, sometimes floating them on platforms, to produce this very valuable white ogeechee honey. It's high fructose to sucrose content

Nyssa Ogeche

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . The rarest of the North American Nyssa trees is Nyssa ogeche. The species name comes from the Ogeechee River in Georgia, a blackwater river, like our Edisto River in South Carolina. It, too has beautiful bald cypress trees growing in it. But In its massive drainage basin, you'll also find this Nyssa species, with the common name Ogeechee lime, which only grows in four states. Like its relative Nyssa aquatica, it

Varieties of Nyssa Sylvatica

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Nyssa sylvatica has two varieties. On drier sites, you'll find Nyssa sylvatica var sylvatica. In wet areas, often growing with bald cypress, the variety biflora is found. Both exhibit beautiful fall color, have small flowers very important to pollinators and produce fruits relished by birds and certain mammals. Also, their leaves are browsed by certain animals. When, as often happens, they become hollow with age,

Hollow Trees

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . Today we fret over hollow trees, although educational websites say that those trees can be almost as strong as a tree still filled with heartwood. Trees near trafficked areas or buildings should be evaluated by an arborist. But for wildlife, hollows serve as homes for bats, birds, mammals, and reptiles. We've been talking about early farmers used sections of blackgum tree hollows to make bee hives. If you want to see

More Blackgum Tales

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . I'm still excited about George Ellison's column in the Asheville Citizen Times "Why the blackgum has a hollow trunk" — do look it up --as it paints a wonderful picture of how something that sounds bad – a rotten tree – was critically important in frontier life. The most popular use for cut sections of these hollow trunks was to construct hives called bee gums. Ellison recounts the story of a farmer in disagreement

Using the Hollow Trunk of a Blackgum Tree

Hello Gardeners, I'm Amanda McNulty with Clemson Extension and Making It Grow . George Ellison in his column "Why the blackgum tree has a hollow trunk," Asheville Citizen Times , lists how people used these pipe-like tree parts after heart rot fungus had rendered them hollow. Ellison describes how they were fashioned into rabbit traps (mostly caught possums), lined the upper reaches of wells, became containers when given a bottom, and were made into bee houses, called bee gums, in the days

Back To Top