Forum KQED's live call-in program presents wide-ranging discussions of local, state, national and international issues, as well as in-depth interviews.
Forum

Forum

From KQED

KQED's live call-in program presents wide-ranging discussions of local, state, national and international issues, as well as in-depth interviews.

Most Recent Episodes

NFL's Carl Nassib Draws Cheers After Publicly Announcing He's Gay

Carl Nassib, a defensive lineman for the Las Vegas Raiders, made history this week as the first active NFL player to publicly identify as gay. We'll talk about the significance of his announcement with Rick Welts, president and chief operating officer of the Golden State Warriors. Welts himself came out while he was an executive with the Phoenix Suns, and we'll hear his reflections on the pressures faced by LGBTQ professional athletes.

How to Heal From Burnout in Time for Re-Entry

As people resume pre-pandemic activities and a number of workers return to offices, some are dealing with pandemic hangovers in the form of burnout.The term "burnout" gained prevalence in recent years to describe when someone feels exhausted, ineffective and unmotivated to do activities they once enjoyed. Experts say this state, often caused by chronic stress, can affect workers at all levels and occupations and won't be fixed by time off or even outright quitting. We'll talk about burnout and how to heal from it, and we want to hear your experiences. Email us at Forum@kqed.org or leave a voicememo at 415-553-3300.

Taiwanese Restaurants Bring Taste of Taipei to Bay Area

Often called a "regional Chinese cuisine," Taiwanese food is making its own distinctive mark on the Bay Area food landscape. Taiwanese restaurants and pop-ups are serving up dishes like lu rou fan, a pork belly rice, and gua bao, an open pork bun, and cooking up dishes for an immigrant diaspora nostalgic for the night markets of Taipei. We take a deep dive into Taiwanese food with KQED food editor Luke Tsai and a local restaurateur who explain what makes Taiwanese food Taiwanese.

The Troubles and Mysteries of the Western Monarch Butterfly

The Western monarch butterfly population has fallen by 99% since the 1980's largely due to pesticide use and habitat loss. And the butterflies that have survived are changing their behavior in unexpected ways, remaining in the Bay Area over the winter instead of heading to the California coast from October to March. In response, conservation groups like Oakland's Pollinator Posse are working to restore habitats by planting native milkweed. We'll discuss why important pollinators are disappearing and what can be done about it.

Backlash Against Critical Race Theory Gains Steam Amid Reckoning on Racism

Critical race theory has come under fire from some conservatives, elected leaders, parents and educators. The concept evolved decades ago from legal scholarship seeking to understand how racial bias plays a role in U.S. laws and institutions. Efforts to dismantle critical race theory are now gaining traction more than a year into what many people consider a national reckoning with racism. More than twenty states have introduced or passed legislation that would ban schools from teaching about racism or "divisive concepts." We talk about what critical race theory is and why it is stirring backlash now.

Backlash Against Critical Race Theory Gains Steam Amid Reckoning on Racism

National Youth Poet Laureate Alexandra Huynh Captures Identity, Climate Change and the Imp...

Sacramento-based poet Alexandra Huynh says that poetry is a way both to acknowledge our reality and imagine a better world. Huynh, who was appointed the 2021 National Youth Poet Laureate last month, interweaves stories and images of fire in California, floods in Vietnam and the global impact of a single footprint. We'll talk about her work, which addresses social injustice, the global effects of climate change and her Vietnamese American identity, and the importance of youth voices in poetry.

National Youth Poet Laureate Alexandra Huynh Captures Identity, Climate Change and the Imp...

Imagining a Not So Grim Post-Apocalyptic Future with Writers Kim Stanley Robinson and Annalee Newitz

Confronting the reality of climate change is often a terrifying and paralyzing activity. But, in the right hands, the story of our warming planet can be a tale of human ingenuity, resilience, and adaptability. Humans, for better or worse, find ways to adapt to almost anything, even the collapse of civilizations. Forum brings together two legendary local science fiction writers, Kim Stanley Robinson and Annalee Newitz, to get their incisive perspectives on the question of the long-term fate of humanity. We'll talk about the future of the climate, past civilizations of the earth and the audacity of imagining that human beings might find ways to thrive later this century.

Imagining a Not So Grim Post-Apocalyptic Future with Writers Kim Stanley Robinson and Annalee Newitz

Suzanne Simard on the Intelligence of the Forest

Decades ago, when forest ecologist Suzanne Simard set out to understand why forests tended to heal themselves when left to their own devices, she uncovered early evidence that trees communicate with each other, lending mutual aid during times of duress. Over the years her research deepened and expanded, marked by discoveries that trees relay information through cryptic underground fungal networks and that old trees, known as mother trees, can discern which seedlings are their own and transmit food and water to them. We'll talk to Simard about her work, and the intertwined story of her family, all chronicled in her new book "Finding the Mother Tree."

Our New Co-Host Checks in With Local Creators and Change Makers About What Makes the Bay Special

The Bay Area has recently been presented more as a bundle of problems than the generative, fascinating place that it's been for decades. What are creators in the Bay Area thinking about the future of our cities? How might it change to be a better place for more of our residents? And what could Forum's role be in building this community? These are some of the questions that Alexis Madrigal, Forum's new host for the show's first hour, will be asking of his guests. Spotlighting figures whose work on issues of economic justice, climate, design, and culture are driving innovation in the region, we'll also be hearing from our Bay Area audience about what you want to hear. To begin, Forum co-host Mina Kim will turn the tables and interview Alexis about how he sees the Bay. What are your questions for Forum's newest moderator? How should we cover the Bay Area? Who — or what — makes the it special to you? And what are the questions that intrigue and confound you about this region we call home?

Our New Co-Host Checks in With Local Creators and Change Makers About What Makes the Bay Special

Lack of Meaningful Roles for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders — Both On- and Off-Scre...

Of the 1,300 top Hollywood films of 2007 to 2019, just 44 featured Asian American and Pacific Islander lead actors, and of those only six were women. That's according to a new USC Annenberg study that found a dearth of AAPI representation both behind and in front of the camera — as well as abundant on-screen stereotypical depictions that exoticize, hypersexualize or emasculate Asian characters. We'll talk about the study and hear from actors, writers, directors and producers about their experiences of anti-Asian bias and stereotyping in Hollywood and what needs to change.

Lack of Meaningful Roles for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders — Both On- and Off-Scre...