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Extra: Full Interviews With Jimmy Garoppolo, Joe Staley, Mike McGlinchey, and Kyle Juszczyk

Stephen Dubner's conversations with members of the San Francisco 49ers offense, recorded for Freakonomics Radio episode No. 350, part of the "Hidden Side of Sports" series.

Extra: Full Interviews With Jimmy Garoppolo, Joe Staley, Mike McGlinchey, and Kyle Juszczyk

How to Stop Being a Loser (Ep. 350)

The San Francisco 49ers, one of the most valuable sports franchises in the world, also used to be one of the best. But they've been losing lately — a lot — and one of their players launched a controversy by kneeling during the national anthem. So why is everyone there so optimistic? To find out, we speak with the team's owner, head coach, general manager, and star players, including their new $137.5 million quarterback. (Ep. 2 of "The Hidden Side of Sports" series.)

How Sports Became Us (Ep. 349)

Dollar-wise, the sports industry is surprisingly small, about the same size as the cardboard-box industry. So why does it make so much noise? Because it reflects — and often amplifies — just about every political, economic, and social issue of the day. Introducing a new series, "The Hidden Side of Sports."

Is the Government More Entrepreneurial Than You Think? (Ep. 348)

We all know the standard story: our economy would be more dynamic if only the government would get out of the way. The economist Mariana Mazzucato says we've got that story backward. She argues that the government, by funding so much early-stage research, is hugely responsible for big successes in tech, pharma, energy, and more. But the government also does a terrible job in claiming credit — and, more important, getting a return on its investment.

Why You Shouldn't Open a Restaurant (Ep. 347)

Kenji Lopez-Alt became a rock star of the food world by bringing science into the kitchen in a way that everyday cooks can appreciate. Then he dared to start his own restaurant — and discovered problems that even science can't solve.

Two (Totally Opposite) Ways to Save the Planet (Ep. 346)

The environmentalists say we're doomed if we don't drastically reduce consumption. The technologists say that human ingenuity can solve just about any problem. A debate that's been around for decades has become a shouting match. Is anyone right?

How to Be Happy (Ep. 345)

The U.N.'s World Happiness Report — created to curtail our unhealthy obsession with G.D.P. — is dominated every year by the Nordic countries. We head to Denmark to learn the secrets of this happiness epidemic (and to see if we should steal them).

Who Decides How Much a Life Is Worth?

After every mass shooting or terrorist attack, victims and survivors receive a huge outpouring of support — including a massive pool of compensation money. How should that money be allocated? We speak with the man who's done that job after many tragedies, including 9/11. The hard part, it turns out, isn't attaching a dollar figure to each victim; the hard part is acknowledging that dollars can't heal the pain.

An Astronaut, a Catalan, and Two Linguists Walk Into a Bar...

In this live episode of "Tell Me Something I Don't Know," we learn why New York has skinny skyscrapers, how to weaponize water, and what astronauts talk about in space. Joining Stephen J. Dubner as co-host is the linguist John McWhorter; Bari Weiss (The New York Times) is the real-time fact-checker.

Has Lance Armstrong Finally Come Clean?

He was once the most lionized athlete on the planet, with seven straight Tour de France wins and a victory over cancer too. Then the doping charges caught up with him. When he finally confessed to Oprah, he admits, "it didn't go well at all." That's because he wasn't actually contrite yet. Now, five years later, he says he is. Do you believe him?

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