The New Yorker Radio Hour The New Yorker Radio Hour is a weekly program presented by the magazine's editor, David Remnick, and produced by WNYC Studios and The New Yorker. Each episode features a diverse mix of interviews, profiles, storytelling, and an occasional burst of humor inspired by the magazine, and shaped by its writers, artists, and editors. This isn't a radio version of a magazine, but something all its own, reflecting the rich possibilities of audio storytelling and conversation. Theme music for the show was composed and performed by Merrill Garbus of tUnE-YArDs.
The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

From WNJP Radio - FM

The New Yorker Radio Hour is a weekly program presented by the magazine's editor, David Remnick, and produced by WNYC Studios and The New Yorker. Each episode features a diverse mix of interviews, profiles, storytelling, and an occasional burst of humor inspired by the magazine, and shaped by its writers, artists, and editors. This isn't a radio version of a magazine, but something all its own, reflecting the rich possibilities of audio storytelling and conversation. Theme music for the show was composed and performed by Merrill Garbus of tUnE-YArDs.

Most Recent Episodes

How Far Has the F.B.I. Gone to Protect White Supremacy?

Today, Martin Luther King, Jr.,'s work on civil rights is celebrated as bringing about one of the turning points of the twentieth century in America. But, in his own time, King was a divisive figure, unloved by millions of Americans—many members of government among them. The F.B.I. surveilled him constantly. President Lyndon Johnson worked with King to shape benchmark civil-rights legislation, but, after King spoke out against the Vietnam War, he was effectively alienated by the Administration. Meanwhile, J. Edgar Hoover's agents at the F.B.I. began active measures to destroy King's reputation and end his public influence, threatening to expose an extramarital affair. The documentary "MLK/FBI," directed by Sam Pollard, examines this low point in the federal government's abuse of power. Pollard tells Jelani Cobb that Hoover must have wondered, " 'How dare a Black man try to change the America I grew up in?' The America he knew and loved was on a road to change. And he was totally against it." Even today, as a leaked document shows, some within the F.B.I. see Black activists' calls for justice and recognition as potential dangers to be watched carefully.

Donald Trump's American Carnage Comes to Washington

Luke Mogelson and Susan B. Glasser report on the convulsions of Donald Trump's final days in office, an unprecedented second impeachment of a President, and the threat of insurrectionary violence hovering over the entire nation. And a game designer offers insights on how the fantastical, wholly fictional narrative of QAnon has captivated so many people—to such dangerous effect.

Questions about the Variant Virus, and Posthumous Albums by Pop Smoke and others

A new variant of SARS-CoV-2 is making its way around the world; in the U.S., it has been found in at least three states: California, Colorado, and New York. Joe Osmundson, an assistant professor of biology at New York University, speaks with the New Yorker staff writer Carolyn Kormann about why this new strain is particularly concerning. It has twenty-three mutations—far more than scientists would expect an RNA virus to have—which makes it at least fifty per cent more contagious than the original virus. The response, Osmundson says, should be to double down on reducing transmission by encouraging a culture of caution. Mask wearing, he warns, might be with us for a long time. Osmundson came of age as a gay man during the AIDS crisis, and he compares our pressing need for social distancing to the cultural change that took place during that era. "It was not a joy, growing up, to worry about H.I.V. every time I had sex, and to feel like if I don't wear a condom, I might die," he tells Kormann. "And yet that was part of how we cared for each other. It is a way to care." Plus, a music editor and writer picks some favorites from a very specific genre: posthumous rap albums.

Questions about the Variant Virus, and Posthumous Albums by Pop Smoke and others

Democrats Take the Senate, and a Mob Storms the Capitol

On January 6th, pro-Trump fanatics stormed the Capitol, galvanized by the President's claims that the 2020 election had been stolen. That day, Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff were declared the victors of their respective Senate runoff races against Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, two champions of Trump's incendiary theories. Charles Bethea, a New Yorker staff writer based in Atlanta, joins Dorothy Wickenden to discuss whether this is the end of an era or just the beginning.

Bruce Springsteen Talks with David Remnick

Bruce Springsteen, an American music legend for more than four decades, published his autobiography, "Born to Run," in 2016. David Remnick called it "as vivid as his songs, with that same pedal-to-the-floor quality, and just as honest about the struggles in his own life." In October of that year, Springsteen appeared at the New Yorker Festival for an intimate conversation with the editor. (The event sold out in six seconds.) This entire episode is dedicated to that conversation. Springsteen tells Remnick how, as a young musician gigging around New Jersey, he decided to up his game: "I'm going to have to write some songs that are fireworks . . . I needed to do something that was more original." They talked for more than an hour about Springsteen's tortured relationship with his father, his triumphant audition for the legendary producer John Hammond, and his struggles with depression. As Springsteen explains it, his tremendously exuberant concert performances were a form of catharsis: "I had had enough of myself by that time to want to lose myself. So I went onstage every night to do exactly that." This episode originally aired in 2016.

Atul Gawande and Andrew Bird Discuss the Art and Science of Cancer

Atul Gawande is a New Yorker staff writer, a practicing surgeon, and an indie-music fan, and he loves the work of the songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and whistling virtuoso Andrew Bird; Gawande has included Bird's songs in playlists he uses in the operating room. In 2016, at the New Yorker Festival, Gawande spoke with Bird about songwriting, confronting illness, the nature of cancer, and whistling. Andrew Bird performed "Capsized," in which he played all of the parts with the help of looping devices. Bird's latest record is "Hark!" a Christmas-themed album. Atul Gawande was recently appointed to the incoming Biden Administration's COVID-19 task force.

Lawrence Wright on How the Pandemic Response Went So Wrong

The first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine mark what we hope will be the beginning of the end of the global pandemic. The speed of vaccine development has been truly unprecedented, but this breakthrough is taking place at a moment when the U.S. death toll has also reached a new peak—over three thousand per day. How was the response to such a clear danger mismanaged so tragically? The New Yorker staff writer Lawrence Wright—who has reported on Al Qaeda and the Church of Scientology—has followed the story of the pandemic unfolding in the United States since the first lockdowns in March. Wright walks David Remnick through key moments of decision-making in the Trump White House: from the response to the first reports of a virus to botched mask mandates and testing rollouts, up through the emergency-use authorization of the vaccine. The Trump Administration bears much responsibility for the bungled response to the coronavirus pandemic, but Wright also finds ample evidence of larger, systemic breakdown. "The magnitude of our failure," he tells David Remnick, "is unparalleled."

Looking Back at an Unimaginable Year

It's a cliché now, but by no means an overstatement, that the past twelve months have been unimaginable. This week, we'll hear four short reflections on the events of 2020. Dhruv Khullar describes the early days of the pandemic, when he was taking care of patients in a COVID-19 ward. Anna Wiener visits California's Big Basin Redwoods State Park, which burned during the catastrophic West Coast fire season that destroyed acreage close to the area of Massachusetts. Simon Parkin waxes nostalgic—already!—for Animal Crossing: New Horizons, a video game that occupied untold hours of families at home together. And Kevin Young, The New Yorker's poetry editor, picks two poems that stand as monuments to what we have lived through: "George Floyd," by Terrance Hayes, and "The End of Poetry," by Ada Limón, both of which were read by the authors.

Bryant Terry "Blackifies" Fennel, and Ian Frazier Says Goodbye to 2020, in Verse

Bryant Terry is a chef, educator, food-justice activist, and cookbook author. He joined Helen Rosner virtually to cook a dish from his recent book, "Vegetable Kingdom": citrus and garlic-herb braised fennel. The dish calls for marinating the bulb in mojo, a citrus-juice-based Cuban condiment more typically paired with meat. Terry says that he wants to "Blackify" fennel, as part of his project to "uplift" Black culinary traditions from the global African diaspora. Plus, Ian Frazier reads a poem written for the 2020 holiday season.

Bryant Terry "Blackifies" Fennel, and Ian Frazier Says Goodbye to 2020, in Verse

The Republican Rift in Georgia, and the Protests Sweeping Nigeria

In the past month, a fracture has opened up in the G.O.P. between those who grudgingly accept Joe Biden's win and those who falsely claim that the election was rigged. In Georgia, supporters of Donald Trump have turned on Republican election officials—in some cases, with threats of violence. The Atlanta-based staff writer Charles Bethea explains why this rift is dangerous for Republicans. Georgia's two incumbent Senate seats are up for grabs in a runoff election in January; the G.O.P. needs to retain at least one to maintain its majority and to give Mitch McConnell near-veto power over the Biden agenda. But the more that the President and his followers attack the election, the less likely Republican voters are to turn out to vote—which would create an advantage for the Democratic Senate hopefuls. Bethea spoke with Gabe Sterling, an election official in Georgia; Lin Wood, an attorney who is fuelling conspiracy theories; and voters at a Trump rally in Valdosta. Plus, protests against police violence took place around the world this year; in Nigeria, they might lead to the undoing of a notoriously lawless and brutal police unit.

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