The New Yorker Radio Hour The New Yorker Radio Hour is a weekly program presented by the magazine's editor, David Remnick, and produced by WNYC Studios and The New Yorker. Each episode features a diverse mix of interviews, profiles, storytelling, and an occasional burst of humor inspired by the magazine, and shaped by its writers, artists, and editors. This isn't a radio version of a magazine, but something all its own, reflecting the rich possibilities of audio storytelling and conversation. Theme music for the show was composed and performed by Merrill Garbus of tUnE-YArDs.
The New Yorker Radio Hour

The New Yorker Radio Hour

From WNJP Radio - FM

The New Yorker Radio Hour is a weekly program presented by the magazine's editor, David Remnick, and produced by WNYC Studios and The New Yorker. Each episode features a diverse mix of interviews, profiles, storytelling, and an occasional burst of humor inspired by the magazine, and shaped by its writers, artists, and editors. This isn't a radio version of a magazine, but something all its own, reflecting the rich possibilities of audio storytelling and conversation. Theme music for the show was composed and performed by Merrill Garbus of tUnE-YArDs.

Most Recent Episodes

Elvis Costello Talks with David Remnick

Elvis Costello's thirty-first studio album, "Hey Clockface," will be released this month. Recorded largely before the pandemic, it features an unusual combination of winds, cello, piano, and drums. David Remnick talks with Costello about the influence of his father's career in jazz and about what it's like to look back on his own early years. They also discuss "Fifty Songs for Fifty Days," a new project leading up to the Presidential election—though Costello disputes that the songs are political. "I don't have a manifesto and I don't have a slogan," he says. "I try to avoid the simplistic slogan nature of songs. I try to look for the angle that somebody else isn't covering." But he notes that "the things that we are so rightly enraged about, [that] we see as unjust . . . it's all happened before. . . . I didn't think I'd be talking with my thirteen-year-old son about a lynching. Those are the things I was hearing reported on the news at their age." Costello spoke from outside his home in Vancouver, B.C., where a foghorn is audible in the background.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Elizabeth Warren on the State of Our Democracy

At the 2020 New Yorker Festival, earlier this month, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Elizabeth Warren joined Andrew Marantz to talk about the Presidential race, and how Joe Biden should lead if he wins the election. Plus, Dexter Filkins on the fierce electoral battle taking place in Florida, the largest of the swing states. With a large elderly-voter population and many distinct Latino communities, the state is demographically unique. Filkins spoke with the former sSenator Bill Nelson and others, including The New Yorker's Stephania Taladrid, who has been reporting on the Latino vote in different states.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Elizabeth Warren on the State of Our Democracy

The Battle Over Portland

During the Presidential debate in September, Donald Trump was asked to denounce the white supremacists who were battling anti-racism protesters in Portland; instead, he blamed leftists for the violence and told the Proud Boys to "stand by." The Pacific Northwest has a long history of white-supremacist violence, going back to the days of the Oregon Territory. Today, white nationalists have chosen to make liberal Portland a battleground. As clashes between anti-racism protesters and extremists intensify, one man remembers the basic injustices that brought him to the streets in the first place.

Anthony Fauci Then and Now, and the Writer-Director Radha Blank

At the moment that Donald Trump was leaving Walter Reed Hospital, not yet recovered from a case of COVID-19, Dr. Anthony Fauci sat down with Michael Specter to discuss the coronavirus and its impact on America. For the President—and all of us counting on a vaccine to miraculously deliver us back to normalcy—Fauci offers a reality check. "Let's say we have a vaccine and it's seventy per cent effective. But only sixty per cent of the people [are likely to] get vaccinated. The vaccine will greatly help us, but it's not going to eliminate mask-wearing, avoiding crowds, and things like that." Plus, Vinson Cunningham talks with Radha Blank about her loosely autobiographical new film, which won her best director at Sundance.

Marilynne Robinson on Faith, Love, and Politics

Marilynne Robinson's new novel, "Jack," is the fourth to be set among the world and people of a fictional town called Gilead, Iowa. The novelist grew up in Idaho, and, when she moved to the flatter country of Iowa, she "noticed that the landscape had a very high number of little colleges scattered over it," she tells David Remnick, that were sometimes the oldest buildings in a town. "I wanted to know who had built these things, that this was how you would settle an empty landscape. And that was when I came across the abolitionist movement. Those were the people who did this." From that history and culture, Robinson imagined Gilead and the old preacher named John Ames who narrates the first book in her series. "Jack" concerns the son of Ames's closest friend, who was disgraced and left Gilead. The book finds Jack, who is white, in St. Louis and in a predicament: he is in love with a Black woman, at a time when an interracial relationship was a scandal and, in some places, a crime. Plus, the début novelist Douglas Stuart. After two decades of working in the fashion industry and dreaming about writing, Stuart recently published an acclaimed first novel, "Shuggie Bain." He showed us around his old stomping grounds in New York's garment district.

The Election, as Seen from Swing States

Joe Biden leads the Presidential race in Pennsylvania by around ten per cent, according to most polls, but Eliza Griswold says you wouldn't know it on the ground. Republicans in the state have organized a huge registration drive in recent years, and, while Griswold was driving to Biden's working-class birthplace of Scranton, she saw Trump signs blanketing the lawns and roads. Peter Slevin, reporting from Wisconsin, tells David Remnick that Democrats there organized early, to avoid the mistake that Hillary Clinton made in 2016 of taking the state for granted. Even so, Biden's campaign has declined to do risky in-person events, but the Trump campaign, until recently, has proceeded as if coronavirus had never happened. Plus, Andrew Marantz talks with a Tennessee pastor who's struggling with the intersection of politics and faith.

Keith Knight of "Woke," and Jia Tolentino Picks Three

"Woke," a new comedy on Hulu, is inspired by the life of its creator, Keith Knight. The show, which blends reality and animated fantasy, follows Keef, a Black cartoonist who is on the cusp of mainstream success when an ugly incident with the police changes his life. Suddenly, Keef is learning about racism from a chatty trash can and other talking cartoon objects, and he experiences a belated political awakening. Knight describes his work to his fellow-cartoonist Emily Flake as "accessible yet subversive." "Making people laugh and then punching them in the face with a serious issue is the way to work," he says. Plus, at home with a newborn, the staff writer Jia Tolentino recommends a book, a record, and a reality show that have been entertaining her lately.

Can a Newcomer Unseat Lindsey Graham? Plus, Carlos Lozada on "What Were We Thinking"

Jaime Harrison may seem like a long shot to become a South Carolina senator: he is a Black Democrat who grew up on food stamps in public housing, and he has never held elected public office. But a Quinnipiac poll ties him with Lindsay Graham—each has the support of forty-eight per cent of likely voters. Harrison is not exactly a progressive upstart candidate: he's spent much of his career as a lobbyist, and has worked in the office of House Majority Whip James Clyburn. "I've seen the power of how good public servants can really address the issues of what people deal with," Harrison tells David Remnick. "The worst thing you can do as a public servant is to betray the trust of the people that you represent." For Harrison, Graham's decision to support a fast-track nomination to the Supreme Court proves that "his word is worthless." Plus, Carlos Lozada, a Washington Post books editor, immersed himself in a new genre: books that purport to explain Donald Trump and his era.

Can a Newcomer Unseat Lindsey Graham? Plus, Carlos Lozada on "What Were We Thinking"

Miranda July's Uncomfortable Comedies, and a Toast to Roger Angell

Miranda July's third feature film is "Kajillionaire," a heist movie centered on a dysfunctional family, and her first with a Hollywood star like Evan Rachel Wood. Like most of her work, it can be classified as a comedy, but just barely. "There's some kind of icky, heartbreaking, subterranean feelings about family that I would not willingly have gone towards if it weren't for the silly heist stuff," July tells Deborah Treisman, The New Yorker's fiction editor. July acknowledges that billing her work as comedy allows her the budget to do things that straight drama might not get: "I knew I wanted to make a bigger movie. It changes the medium, it changes the kinds of things you can think up." Tresiman, who has edited July's short stories and other writings for the magazine, talks with her about the thread of discomfort and embarrassment that runs through her work in every medium. Plus, David Remnick toasts the centennial of Roger Angell, who has contributed to The New Yorker since the Second World War with writings on baseball and every other topic under the sun.

An Election in Peril

This Presidential race is a battle for the soul and the future of the country—on this much, both parties agree—and yet the pitfalls in the election process itself are vast. David Remnick runs through some of the risks to your vote with a group of staff writers: Sue Halpern on the possibility of hacking by malign actors; Steve Coll on the contention around mail-in voting and the false suspicions being raised by the President; Jeffrey Toobin on the prospect of an avalanche of legal challenges that could delay the outcome and create a cascade of uncertainty; and Jelani Cobb on the danger of violence in the election's aftermath.

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