MindShift Podcast The MindShift podcast explores the innovations in education that are shaping how kids learn. Hosts Ki Sung and Katrina Schwartz introduce listeners to educators, researchers, parents and students who are developing effective ways to improve how kids learn.We cover topics like how fed-up administrators are developing surprising tactics to deal with classroom disruptions; how listening to podcasts are helping kids develop reading skills; the consequences of overparenting; and why interdisciplinary learning can engage students on all ends of the traditional achievement spectrum.This podcast is part of the MindShift education site, a division of KQED News. KQED is an NPR/PBS member station based in San Francisco.You can also visit the MindShift website for episodes and supplemental blog posts or tweet us @MindShiftKQED or visit us at MindShift.KQED.org.
MindShift Podcast

MindShift Podcast

From KQED

The MindShift podcast explores the innovations in education that are shaping how kids learn. Hosts Ki Sung and Katrina Schwartz introduce listeners to educators, researchers, parents and students who are developing effective ways to improve how kids learn.We cover topics like how fed-up administrators are developing surprising tactics to deal with classroom disruptions; how listening to podcasts are helping kids develop reading skills; the consequences of overparenting; and why interdisciplinary learning can engage students on all ends of the traditional achievement spectrum.This podcast is part of the MindShift education site, a division of KQED News. KQED is an NPR/PBS member station based in San Francisco.You can also visit the MindShift website for episodes and supplemental blog posts or tweet us @MindShiftKQED or visit us at MindShift.KQED.org.

Most Recent Episodes

5 Cognitive Biases that Shape Classroom Interactions - and How to Overcome Them

Educator, Tricia Ebarvia advocates for a more complete way of seeing ourselves, one another and curricula. She just published a book titled "Get Free: Antibias Literacy Instruction for Stronger Readers, Writers, and Thinkers." She joins KQED's Ki Sung in conversation to unpack bias, which is all around us, and to share tips on how teachers can enable students to improve their reading and writing skills.

5 Cognitive Biases that Shape Classroom Interactions - and How to Overcome Them

Bettina Love Explains How Policy Ended a 'Glorious' Era in Black Ed

In "Punished for Dreaming," Bettina Love reflects on a 'glorious' era in Black education, unraveling historical nuances and consequences of policy decisions that led to its decline. Through insightful analysis, she navigates the challenges faced by Black students and educators, offering solutions for a more equitable educational future.

Nurturing Students' Academic Identities in Uncertain Times

Miriam Plotinsky, an instructional coach, author, and former high school English teacher, discusses her latest book, Writing Their Future Selves: Instructional Strategies to Affirm Student Identity. It contains a wealth of tools for classroom teachers including journal prompts, discussion formats and some of Plotinsky's favorite writing games.

How to Build a Safe Space to Discuss Students' Names

Matthew R. Kay and Jennifer Orr discuss how they turn simple conversations about students' names into opportunities for connection and self-discovery.

Phyllis Fagell's Tools to Unleash Middle School Superpowers

Phyllis Fagell, Psychotherapist and author of the new book "Middle School Superpowers: Raising Resilient Tweens in Turbulent Times," talks about why middle school is the last best chance to impress social skills and values upon kids; plus she'll share some developmentally appropriate tools parents and educators can use to better understand their tweens, cultivate a sense of belonging and help them when they get into trouble.

Dear Math: You Are Terrible and Wonderful

MindShift spotlights a teacher who encourages students to name their feelings and share their past experiences – the highs and the lows – by writing letters to math. This activity launches a yearlong process of building a classroom culture where all students feel confident to share their ideas and problem-solving strategies. The episode features excerpts from "Dear Math" letters, insights from math education experts, and reflections from two alumni about how the class shaped their mathematical identities.

How Green Schoolyards Can Turn Schools into 3D Textbooks

Most people are familiar with snow and rain as reasons to cancel recess. But what about canceling recess because it's too sunny? Playgrounds in California are heating up. And with asphalt blacktops and metal monkey bars, kids are forced to skip outdoor activities to avoid getting burned on school yards that can reach up to 140 degrees. One solution to this problem is to green schoolyards by adding trees, gardens, and other vegetation. Green schoolyards not only help reduce heat island effects but also provide a wealth of educational opportunities. By using the schoolyard as a 3D textbook, students can learn about climate change, sustainability, and other academic topics through hands-on experiences. For example, students can learn about water conservation by monitoring rain gardens or composting food waste in the school garden. Additionally, green schoolyards can provide a safe and stimulating environment for students to learn, play, and connect with nature, promoting mental and physical health.

The Right Way to Say "I'm Sorry"

We all know how it feels to get a bad apology. "I'm sorry if," "I'm sorry but," and other ways people skirt real acknowledgement of wrongdoing. Effective apologies require empathy, perspective-taking, honesty and courage, and making amends is an important habit for healthy school communities. In this episode, MindShift talks with two authors who analyze apologies in the news for a website called SorryWatch. Then we meet a fifth-grade teacher who teaches her students a seven-step formula for apologies through role-playing and class discussions. Her students not only learn to recognize and enact good apologies – they also share that knowledge on the playground and with their families at the dinner table.

Inclusive Dress Codes: A Challenge and an Opportunity

In recent years, dress codes have been undergoing significant shifts in many schools across the nation. With language targeting hair, visible skin, and footwear, dress codes are often touted as promoting professionalism and eliminating distractions in the classroom. However, policies around dress codes are receiving pushback from students and parents for disproportionately impacting students of color, LGBTQ+ students, and students from low-income backgrounds. In response to student-led research, one Washington DC-based school decided to center input from students to reevaluate their policies to ensure they are inclusive and respectful of all students. In this episode, MindShift investigates the reasons behind creating rules around what students wear, whether dress codes work the way adults hope they do, and one school's process of creating a more relaxed dress code.

How Extroverted Teachers Can Engage Introverted Students

As educators move away from sage-on-the-stage instruction, their first step is often to foster more student discussion. A talkative classroom might be a mark of success in student-centered learning, but it doesn't mean every student is engaged. In this episode, MindShift visits a language arts classroom where an extroverted teacher has developed creative ways of inviting introverted students to share their thinking. We also hear from an education researcher who says we should view student engagement as a continuum, and from a teacher who uses that continuum to better understand how students are driving their learning.