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Inflection Point

Inflection Point

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Most Recent Episodes

What Happens When Sexual Assault Goes Unpunished: Sarah Delia, Creator of "She Says"

When radio journalist Sarah Delia heard a story about the sexual assault of one of her station's listeners, "Linda" (not her real name), she knew it was a story that needed to be told. It's also a story about how one survivor took matters into her own hands when the police department she turned to for help seemed to be failing to help her. And it's a story about how our criminal justice system handles sexual assault cases nationwide--and what needs to change to make violence against women the exception rather than the status quo. Sarah turned Linda's story into a new investigative podcast series called "She Says". Listen to our conversation about the courage it takes to tell your story of sexual assault--and keep telling it---until you are heard by someone who can help you get justice. And also--what it takes to be the person who takes on the "second-degree trauma" of listening to and reporting on stories of sexual assault. Join the conversation when you join our "Inflection Point Society" Facebook Group— for everyday activists who want to make extraordinary social change through everyday actions. Thank you to our sponsors: Banish skin care (Get $10 off at banish.com for a limited time with code INFLECTION) Commonspace podcast Listeners, please consider supporting at inflectionpointradio.org/contribute.

What Happens When Sexual Assault Goes Unpunished: Sarah Delia, Creator of "She Says"

Are We Teaching Our Girls Too Much Empathy? -Emily Abad, The Mosaic Project

Empathy is often seen as the magic bullet against intolerance. But when we take on too much empathy for others it can be difficult to create emotional boundaries when it comes to our own needs. At the same time, when we put up emotional walls, we're judged as being selfish, cold or "bossy."** ** Emily Abad is someone who was raised to always put others' needs ahead of her own and not speak up for herself. She's always struggled to find that perfect balance between empathy and assertiveness. When her religious father refused to accept her after she came out as gay, she was at a loss as to what to do. Then she began working with kids at the Mosaic Project, an experiential education program addressing issues of diversity, empathy, and conflict resolution. Hear how teaching kids the power of speaking their truth from a place of love helped Emily to find her own voice. This episode is brought to you in part by Banish skin care. Get $10 for a limited time when you use the code INFLECTION. And, Commonspace, a podcast featuring live storytelling and conversation. Season two is rolling out right now. And when you're done, come on over to The Inflection Point Society, our Facebook group of everyday activists who seek to make extraordinary change through small, daily actions. Support Inflection Point with a monthly or one-time contribution at inflectionpointradio.org to keep women's stories front and center.

Are We Teaching Our Girls Too Much Empathy? -Emily Abad, The Mosaic Project

How to Age Without Apology - Nina Collins, author of "What Would Virginia Woolf Do?"

What's so monumental about turning 40 that women need their own Facebook group? Turns out--pretty much everything. From discussing fashion to friendship to feminism, work and health Nina Collins has created an "environment that's a little like Vegas...our special place to talk about what's really going on in our lives..." But why don't real life friends fill that need? Collins turned what she learned from the group--and her own experience with hitting 40–into a book, "What Would Virginia Woolf Do?" Hear it all, including a foray into chin hairs and Botox on this week's episode.

How to Age Without Apology - Nina Collins, author of "What Would Virginia Woolf Do?"

Do Haters Deserve Our Compassion? - Sally Kohn, author of "The Opposite of Hate"

Can you find compassion in your heart for the haters in your life? Should you? CNN political commentator and first-time author Sally Kohn says if we keep on hating the haters, the cycle of hate will never end. She's believes compassion to be one of the keys to breaking the cycle of hatred that pervades our culture in today's divisive world. The question is, how can compassion defeat a system fuelled by hate? Listen in on my conversation with Sally Kohn, author of "The Opposite of Hate" on what she's learned from her own missteps as a former school bully and, paradoxically, as a well-meaning liberal, breaking the cycle of hate, and cultivating compassion for her perceived enemies. Like what you hear? Support the show at inflectionpointradio.org and join our Facebook group The Inflection Point Society.

Do Haters Deserve Our Compassion? - Sally Kohn, author of "The Opposite of Hate"

"I am powerful by just living" - Sarah McBride, LGBTQ activist & author of "Tomorrow Will ...

Sarah McBride made history as the first transgender person to speak at a national political convention in 2016. As of 2018, more than half of LGBTQ people live in states that don't protect them from discrimination or are even actively hostile towards them. In the most challenging moments--the 2016 election results, everyday sexism and misogyny and the death of her young husband--even then she fights to update our laws to protect and include LGBTQ people. Her vision and focus on achieving a more equal world, where everyone is seen and accepted for who they are, is so clear that it almost seems simple. So why does it have to be so hard to get to that point? Listen to my conversation with Sarah McBride, LGBTQ activist and author of the new book, "Tomorrow Will Be Different". And when you're done, come on over to The Inflection Point Society, our Facebook group of everyday activists who seek to make extraordinary change through small, daily actions. Want to support more stories of how women rise up? Go to: inflectionpointradio.org

"I am powerful by just living" - Sarah McBride, LGBTQ activist & author of "Tomorrow Will ...

Is 'Girl Power' Creating a Mental Health Crisis? - Rachel Simmons, author "Enough As She Is"

For many girls today, the relentless pursuit of accomplishment is fueled by harsh self-criticism and an acute fear of failure. Rachel Simmons has been researching young women for two decades, and her research plainly shows that girl competence does not equal girl confidence—nor does it equal happiness, resilience, or self-worth. As an educator and author of "Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives", Rachel teaches girls and women skills to build their resilience, amplify their voices, and own their courage so that they—and their relationships—live with integrity and health. Want to be part of the conversation? Join our "Inflection Point Society" Facebook Group for everyday activists who want to make extraordinary social change through everyday actions. Your support is the nutrient that keeps us marching! Please support the program at inflectionpointradio.org/contribute.

Is 'Girl Power' Creating a Mental Health Crisis? - Rachel Simmons, author "Enough As She Is"

Why Rosie the Riveter is "Not my icon" - Betty Reid Soskin, National Park Service

For the past decade, 96-year-old Betty Reid Soskin has served as the nation's oldest Park Ranger, where she gives talks at the Rosie the Riveter WWII Home Front National Historical Park. But the triumphant story of the now ubiquitous feminist icon, Rosie the Riveter, is not Betty's story. While Rosie was breaking barriers for twentieth century white women in the workforce, Black women like Betty and her slave ancestors had been serving as laborers "outside the home" for centuries. In our live talk at INFORUM at the Commonwealth Club, Betty offers a clear-eyed perspective on the untold stories of the American narrative and the ever-rising spiral our country is making toward equality.

Why Rosie the Riveter is "Not my icon" - Betty Reid Soskin, National Park Service

My Privilege Wakeup Call with Ijeoma Oluo, author of "So You Want To Talk About Race"

An awkward conversation with her white mother about "good white people" inspired Ijeoma Oluo to take on the unenviable task of writing one of the most user-friendly books on race of our time: "So You Want To Talk About Race." In plain language, Ijeoma has confronted deeply uncomfortable questions surrounding racial injustice from the school-to-prison pipeline to the Black Lives Matter movement to white feminism and intersectionality. In our conversation, Ijeoma helps me to understand the insidious nature of white supremacy in our world. She also wakes me up to the fact that solidarity between all women cannot happen until white cis women hold themselves accountable to the ways they have benefitted from systems of oppression. Most importantly, Ijeoma offers practical, everyday actions that you can do today to help dismantle the system of racism. You can support more of these conversations at inflectionpointradio.org/contribute.

My Privilege Wakeup Call with Ijeoma Oluo, author of "So You Want To Talk About Race"

New Season Trailer

It's time for some tough conversations about what women are up against right now and what to do about it. So how can everyday women and men rise up and make true equality happen? On Inflection Point I'm joined by experts and policy makers; authors and activists who are pounding on doors and breaking them down...And calling it out when something's not right. These are the tough conversations women are having, but everyone needs to hear. On Inflection Point you'll hear honest, powerful stories that will help you see the world with a little more promise. And you'll come away with ideas you can apply to your own life. Hit that Subscribe button and don't miss a single episode of Inflection Point with Lauren Schiller.

How Girls Change The World - Paola Gianturco & Alex Sangster

There are girls all around the globe addressing tough issues that no young person should have to deal with--but must, by the luck of where and when they were born. Things like child marriage, sex trafficking, limited access to education, and poverty. Over 100 of these girls who have decided to do something about the problems in their community are featured in a new book called "Wonder Girls: Changing Our World." It was written by photojournalist Paola Gianturco and her 11 year old granddaughter, Alex Sangster who interviewed and photographed girl activists from fifteen girl-led nonprofit groups across the world...Girls who have managed to take their outrage and turn it into action. If you'd like to support Inflection Point, just go to inflectionpointradio.org/contribute to find out more.

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