The 21st Join host Niala Boodhoo for an interactive talk show that sets a new standard for conversation in Illinois. The show airs M-F at 11 AM on WILL-AM580 and streams live at 21stShow.org. Follow on Twitter: @21stshow.
The 21st

The 21st

From Illinois Public Media

Join host Niala Boodhoo for an interactive talk show that sets a new standard for conversation in Illinois. The show airs M-F at 11 AM on WILL-AM580 and streams live at 21stShow.org. Follow on Twitter: @21stshow.More from The 21st »

Most Recent Episodes

Fast Food 'No Poaching' Clauses; Trade Wars & Farmers; Small Town 'Brain Gain'

On the 21st: We discussed the small clause in an employee contract that prevents fast food workers from moving to different franchise locations. Plus, how this turbulent year in trade policy has affected farmers in the state. And, how some small towns in Illinois and across the country are working to reverse brain drain in their respective communities. Some fast food chains in Illinois and across the country have clauses in their franchise agreements that prevent workers from getting jobs at other locations of the same restaurant owned by a different franchisee. And in many cases, workers don't even know about it. Let's say you work at a Dunkin Donuts, and you find out there are better or more hours available at a location a mile away. But if it's owned by a different franchisee, you might not be able to get the new job. This is because of what's referred to as so called "No Poaching" clauses. They exist in a wide variety of industries, but Attorney General Lisa Madigan has launched an investigation focused on fast food restaurants. She's joined with several other states to demand information from eight fast food companies: Burger King, Dunkin' Donuts, as I mentioned, plus Five Guys Burgers and Fries, Little Caesars, Panera Bread, Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Wendy's and Arby's. However, Arby's has since announced plans to end its requirement franchisees not hire workers from other Arby's franchisees. To talk to us more about no poach agreements, and how they affect workers, we were joined by Eric Posner, a law professor at the University of Chicago who has been researching these practices. 1/2 of all franchises in US use No-Poach clauses, explains Eric Posner of @UChicagoLaw His research has led to investigations by AGs across the country https://t.co/W99APLi9xs — The 21st (@21stShow) July 18, 2018 Plus— We've been hearing about the trade war with China for most of President Trump's administration. First there was the anticipation of it, then the announcement of tariff hikes on Chinese imports. Now we have the potential fallout...especially here in Illinois. Illinois farmers have been one of the most vulnerable groups in this battle. China is the world's largest buyer of American soybeans, and U.S. farmers sell about a third of their soybeans there. And, just last week, soybean prices hit a 10 year low. So what do these back and forth negotiations between our countries mean for farmers' bottom lines? And, for a group that has traditionally been core Republican voters, what will that mean come election time? We heard from some farmers across the state as well as Mike Doherty, a senior economist for the Illinois Farm Bureau. "Economists are still arguing about whether or not we're in a trade war, but if you're in agriculture it certainly feels like it." - Mike Doherty a Senior Economist at @ILFarmBureau#Trade #TradeWars #agriculture — The 21st (@21stShow) July 18, 2018 And— You've probably heard about the idea of a "brain drain" - where young people grow up, leave their hometowns and never come back. We especially hear that when it comes to rural areas. But in some areas in Illinois and across the country, local residents are trying to work together in new ways to reverse that trend - using community-building tools that are a lot more than just trying to get the next big company to set up shop nearby. Brittany Grimes is one of those people who defies the trend. She grew up in Galesburg in the western part of the state and has since moved back to work there and volunteer with Galesburg On Track. Also with us was Alece Montez, the director of programs with the Orton Family Foundation. Gisele Hamm manages the "MAPPING the future of your community" program with the Illinois Institute for Rural Affairs at Western Illinois University. "It's clear we're seeing divides across America, whether its newcomers & old-timers or different sectors...For us, we see the unintended or unexpected benefits of going into small communities." - @alecemontez of @OrtonFoundation — The 21st (@21stShow) July 18, 2018

Fast Food 'No Poaching' Clauses; Trade Wars & Farmers; Small Town 'Brain Gain'

Biometric Data Lawsuit Reaches IL Supreme Court; Electronic Monitoring Devices; HPV Vaccines

On the 21st: A recent court case might shake up our state's law on biometric information. Plus, are electronic monitoring devices a valid alternative to overcrowded jails, or do they do more harm than good? And, the HPV Vaccine is most effective when given to preteens—so why are some parents still hesitant? If you've visited any amusement parks this summer you'll know admission prices can be pretty stiff. But that's not the only cost - you might also be giving away some biometric information - like fingerprints and facial recognition. That's what happened when a child from Lake County bought a season pass to Six Flags Great America in Gurnee, and the park allegedly captured fingerprint information without written consent. In response the child's mother sued - and now that case, Rosenbach versus Six Flags, is before the Illinois Supreme Court. That case could affect a state law that's considered one of the most protective — or restrictive — in the country. It's called the Biometric Information Privacy Act or BIPA, which bans companies from using biometrics without user consent. Rebecca Glenberg is the Senior Staff Counsel at the the ACLU, one of the groups asking the state Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court decision. She was on the line with us from Chicago. Also on the line with was Jay Kesan, a Professor in the Colleges of Law and Engineering at the University of Illinois. Illinois' BIPA law is "pretty stringent," explains @JayPKesan of @UIllinoisLaw. It also allows for private action like the lawsuit the Rosenbachs filed against Six Flags. #Biometrics. — The 21st (@21stShow) July 17, 2018 Plus— Over the last decade or so, law enforcement agencies have turned to electronic monitoring devices as an alternative to overcrowded jails - and a bail system that punishes lower-income people. You're probably familiar with one of the most common forms of electronic monitoring — ankle bracelets that can track a person's location through radio or GPS. A Pew study found that the number of active devices in the US more than doubled between 2005 and 2015. So as these devices are being used more and more throughout Illinois and the country, what do we need to know about how they work? We heard from Sharlyn Grace, co-executive director of the Chicago Community Bond Fund, and Cara Smith, chief policy officer of the Cook County Sheriff's Office. It's important for people to understand that people under electronic monitoring are "expreriencing some of the same harms as in jails." - @SharlynDGrace of @ChiBondFund — The 21st (@21stShow) July 17, 2018 And— When given to pre-teens, the HPV vaccine can prevent 90 percent of related-cancers. So why are only half of teenage girls up-to-date on HPV vaccines? Gardasil made headlines back in 2016 with an ad campaign that asked the same question. If we know HPV related cancers are largely preventable, why are parents still hesitant to vaccinate their sons and daughters against it? The American Cancer Society is back with a public service campaign called HPV Cancer Free that they hope will be a bit less provocative. On the line with us now was Tarneka Manning. Tarneka is the Senior Manager of Primary Care Systems for the American Cancer Society. We were also joined by Dr. Doug Carlson, who is chair of SIU Medicine's Department of Pediatrics "We just get back to the idea that nearly 20,000 people a year die from what is preventable illness." - Dr. Doug Carlson of @siusom on talking to parents about the #HPV vaccine#HPVcancerfree — The 21st (@21stShow) July 17, 2018

Biometric Data Lawsuit Reaches IL Supreme Court; Electronic Monitoring Devices; HPV Vaccines

Third Party Candidates For Governor; Student Loans & Retirement Saving; New Illinois Made Makers

On the 21st: We talked third party candidates for governor and how they can have a much harder time gaining traction, especially here in Illinois. And, the ramifications of student loan debt, and what some employers are doing to combat this issue. Plus, the newest bakeries, farms and other small businesses added to the Illinois Made program. The midterm elections are less than four months way. Voters will choose their state and local officials — including members of Congress and, of course, our next governor. And when you go to fill out your ballot here in Illinois, you'll see at least four names in the race for governor. You probably know about two of them. Our current Republican Governor Bruce Rauner, and the Democratic nominee, billionaire JB Pritzker. But this time, there are two more candidates on the ballot: one of them is the Libertarian Party's nominee, Kash Jackson. And the other is current Republican State Senator Sam McCann, running under the banner of the "Conservative Party." Third party candidates can have a hard time attracting voters when compared to the two dominant parties in the US - and, Illinois doesn't' make it any easier. With us on the line today was Rich Whitney. He was the Green Party's nominee for Governor of Illinois in 2006 and 2010. Brian Gaines was also in our studio at WILL. He's a professor of political science with the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois. "I always chuckle when we say 'third parties.' It's as if we count 'one, two, three, three, three...and anyone who's not a Democrat or a Republican gets designated third." — Brian Gaines, professor with @IllinoisIGPA — The 21st (@21stShow) July 16, 2018 Plus— As the use of student loans increase, so does the awareness of the ramifications of high debt for young Americans--there's bad credit and even stress and poor health according to some studies. And of course, one of the biggest problems is the inability to save. In Illinois, more than 60 percent of students who graduate college in our state have some amount of debt, with an average bill of almost $30,000. Well, now some employers in Illinois are trying to ease that burden by helping young employees save for retirement so that they can focus on paying down their student loan debt. On the line was Mary Moreland. Mary is the Divisional Vice President of Compensation and Benefits for Abbott Laboratories, one of the companies who is helping students save. We're also joined by Paige Jones, who is a Communications Specialist at Abbott. Paige got her masters degree from Northwestern University back in 2016. "We know that people are our biggest asset," explains Mary Moreland of @AbbottNews Their program "Freedom 2 Save" helps employees with student debt save for retirement. — The 21st (@21stShow) July 16, 2018 And— When it comes to buying locally, the Illinois Office of Tourism is trying to make things a little easier for you. They've just added more than two dozen artisans, farms, bakeries and other small businesses to their Illinois Made program. The idea is to help people in Illinois and tourists discover hidden gems in their neighborhood or along their travels. We had some of the new Illinois Made additions on with us today. On the line was Rachel Coventry. Rachel is the store manager and beekeeper at Curtis Orchard in Savoy, outside of Champaign. And from Woodstock we had Annette Gast, the co-owner of the Silver Prairie natural Soap Company and Matt Potts, the founder of Potts and Pans Steelband. .@CurtisOrchard is right here in Champaign and was recently added to @enjoyillinois https://t.co/hUFgdFR5Gz — The 21st (@21stShow) July 16, 2018

Third Party Candidates For Governor; Student Loans & Retirement Saving; New Illinois Made Makers

Science Heroes In Children's Books; Creating Manufacturing Jobs; The Miller Park Zoo

On this encore edition of The 21st: We speak to children's author M.J. Mouton about his book, Richie Doodles: The Brilliance of a Young Richard Feynman. Plus, we revisit our tour of the Miller Park Zoo in Bloomington. But first, what does it take to actually create manufacturing jobs in 2018? Richard Feynman was one of the world's great physicists. He was born in 1918 in New York and won the Nobel Prize in 1965. Albert Einstein even attended the first seminar that Feynman ever taught. He's known in the scientific community for figuring out how to visually map out the math that determines how subatomic particles behave. But it's more than that. Feynman is remembered for his passion, for his ability to describe complex physics to everyday people, and for just having a lot of fun exploring science throughout his entire life. So perhaps it's fitting that Aurora, Illinois-based children's book author M.J. Mouton wrote a new book about what Richard Feynman was like as a kid. It's called Richie Doodles: The Brilliance of a Young Richard Feynman. We spoke with M.J. about Richard Feynman and getting kids excited for science. Plus— For well over a century, people in Bloomington-Normal have been spending time at one of the area's highlights - the Miller Park Zoo. In fact, for a long time, it was the only zoo between St. Louis and Chicago.Miller Park Zoo opened in the late 1800s. Now, located on Historic Route 66, it continues to be popular with travelers. We were joined by director Jay Tetzloff at the zoo, and he came on the show to talk more about the zoo's history and everything it is home to. But first— Often we hear about how manufacturing jobs have declined in the US during these past few decades. Conventional wisdom holds that it's because of cheaper labor in foreign countries - and, the rise of robotics. And the Great Recession didn't help - especially in the Midwest. But research shows that some local labor markets managed to not just survive - but thrive - over the past decade. Take Grand Rapids, Michigan. Its post Recession manufacturing job growth has outpaced the national average. To talk manufacturing, we were joined on the line by Tim Bartik. Tim is a Senior Economist for the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in Kalamazoo, Michigan. We also spoke with Economist Jared Bernstein from Washington. Jared was chief economist to former Vice President Joe Biden and he is currently a senior fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

Science Heroes In Children's Books; Creating Manufacturing Jobs; The Miller Park Zoo

Getting Books To Illinois Prisons; Virtual Medical Interpreters; Chicago's Gang Database

On this encore edition of The 21st: New technology is bringing interpreters directly to patients to help with their medical needs. And, ProPublica Illinois reporter Mick Dumke talks to us about Chicago's problematic "gang database." But first, the state of Illinois spent less than 300 dollars on books throughout all state prisons for the entirety of 2017. What's behind this lack of funding and how is it impacting prisoners? In Illinois, nearly half of all people who are incarcerated are behind bars again within three years. There are a number of solutions that researchers agree on how to prevent that. One of them is pretty simple: having better access to education in prisons. One key part of education is books. But when Lee Gaines started investigating this issue for the Illinois Newsroom, she found that the state's department of corrections spent less than $300 in 2017 on books throughout all the Illinois prisons. That number used to be much higher. IDOC data shows that they spent roughly $786,000 in 2002. So far, IDOC has provided no explanation for such an enormous drop in funding. We spoke with Lee about her story. Also joining us was Megan Maurer. She's currently assistant director of the Scenic Regional Library in Union, Missouri. But she used to work as a librarian at Robinson Correctional Center in southeastern Illinois up until last year. And we spoke with Julius Mercer. He is now a writer and public speaker who lives in Chicago. He was previously incarcerated and spoke with Lee for her story. Plus— When you're at the hospital in need of medical care, you just want to feel better. The last thing you want to think about is if you'll be understood or not. But for millions of people in Illinois, that is often the reality. In Chicagoland alone, there were more than a million people considered limited English proficient in 2011. That's according to The Migration Policy Institute. Last week we were talking about a new initiative by immigration advocates to make hospitals more welcoming to immigrants. An inability to communicate effectively with your doctor or care provider could lead to mistakes or a misdiagnoses. It can also discourage people from seeking the medical help they need in emergencies. Unfortunately, training and providing these interpreters to have on staff can be costly and if it's an emergency, they may not be available at a moment's notice. Now, technology called Video Remote Interpreting, or VRI, is bringing interpreters directly to patients through video. Medical interpreters trained in over 200 languages, including American Sign Language, video conference in to patients. To learn more about VRI, we were joined on the line by Rosalinda Justiniana. She's a Patient Advocate and Language Service Coordinator for Rush-Copley Medical Center in Aurora. Also joining us on the line from Lombard was Jinhi Roskamp. Jinhi is a trilingual interpreter for a VRI company called InDemand Interpreting. And— An investigation from ProPublica Illinois shows that the Chicago Police gang database, which contains information on 128,000 people and counting, is outdated and plagued with inaccuracies. ProPublica reporter Mick Dumke has reporting out this topic and he joined us on the line to tell us more about Chicago's gang database.

Getting Books To Illinois Prisons; Virtual Medical Interpreters; Chicago's Gang Database

Teacher Shortages; 'Welcoming City' Debate; Summer Bike Trails; Biking Across US; Solo Cup History

On the 21st: The latest on the 'Welcoming City' ordinance in Bloomington-Normal. Plus, with summer in full gear, we discuss some of Illinois' bike trails. And, how some bikers take it one step further by biking across the US. Then, the history of Solo Cups - and how they came to be, right here in Illinois. But first, we talk about Illinois' massive teacher shortage, and what lawmakers are doing to try to combat this issue. TEACHER SHORTAGES Guests: Chuck Bleyer, Superintendent, Wabash Community Unit Schools District 348 Lee Gaines, Education reporter, Illinois Newsroom THE 'WELCOMING CITY' DEBATE IN BLOOMINGTON Guests: Ryan Denham, Reporter, WGLT SUMMER BIKE TRAILS Guests: James Roedl, Neutral Cycle in Champaign-Urbana BIKING ACROSS THE US Guests: Daniel De Vise, Author & Journalist SOLO CUP HISTORY Guests: Chris Borrelli, Features writer at the Chicago Tribune

Teacher Shortages; 'Welcoming City' Debate; Summer Bike Trails; Biking Across US; Solo Cup History

Gov. Rauner & ICE Facilities; STEM summer camps for girls; Illinois' Heartbreaking Moments

On the 21st: We talked with Politico's Natashi Korecki about the latest on Gov. Rauner's profits from ICE detention facilities. Plus, STEM summer camps for girls, and what can be done to encourage girls to pursue those careers as they grow up. But first, we go over some of the most heartbreaking moments in Illinois history. Throughout the year we've been talking with the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum about their Illinois 200 lists, which recognize important moments, people, and places in our bicentennial history... that you get to vote on. The website is illinoistop200.com. For the most part, these votes have been a way to celebrate our state's 200th birthday. But, of course, there are dark moments in our past as well. And this past week's category was called Top Heartbreaking Moments. Joining me to talk about those events and which one received the most votes is Chris Wills, the director of Communications and Public Affairs at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. And Sam Wheeler, the State Historian and director of Research with the Lincoln library and museum. "History is never clean. You gotta take the good with the bad," explains @@spwheeler of @ALPLM. In the Effingham hospital fire of 1949, 74 people died, including 11 infants & the nuns who stayed with them. But it led to the adopting of national safety regulations after. — The 21st (@21stShow) July 10, 2018 And— When people hold public office, they have to disclose the kinds of economic interests that they've invested in. Here in Illinois, our current Governor, Bruce Rauner - is worth several hundreds of millions of dollars - and his Democratic opponent JB Pritzker is worth an estimated three and a half billion. Now, a new report from Politico shows Governor Rauner profited off a health provider that works with Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention facilities, including those that house children. All of this as questions linger about how to reunite families that have been separated - and, what kinds of conditions immigrants are living in. The author of that article was with us today. Natasha Korecki wrote the Illinois Playbook for years - you might remember her as a regular guest on our state politics segment. She's recently moved on to become a national political correspondent for Politico "When you hear everyday on the news about Trump's hotels or his daughter's clothing line...Wilbur Ross...Scott Pruitt...eventually we start to get fatigued." - @impactofficer "I fear that people will stop paying attention."@CommonCauseIL @politico @natashakorecki#twill — The 21st (@21stShow) July 10, 2018 Plus— Research shows that at a young age, girls are just as interested in "STEM" subjects - Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math - as boys are. But women are not equally represented in the STEM fields as adults. Last year, women earned just over 30 percent of bachelor degrees across STEM majors. That number is actually up from past years, but getting a degree is not the only hurdle. Once women enter STEM jobs, they are more likely to leave their careers than their male counterparts. That's according to a study from the Center for Work-Life Policy. So, why are we losing so many female scientists and what can be done to change this - especially at a young age? In the studio was Michelle Rodrigues. Michelle is a postdoc researcher in the Laboratory of Evolutionary Endocrinology at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Also in the studio was is Priya Bhatt. Priya just finished her freshman year at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she majors in Anthropology. Priya also grew up going to the GAMES STEM camp here in Urbana - GAMES stands for Girls' Adventures in Mathematics, Engineering, and Science. "They're really capable... In this spirit of learning more about the world, all science fields are worthwhile...And it's good to find female peers." Advice for young female scientists from Priya Bhatt, an Anthroplogy major at @Illinois_Alma who attended #STEM camp — The 21st (@21stShow) July 10, 2018

Gov. Rauner & ICE Facilities; STEM summer camps for girls; Illinois' Heartbreaking Moments

The 100-Mile 'Border Zone'; A Shortage Of Rural Veterinarians; Illinois Politics

On the 21st: Why Border Patrol agents have greater authority to board buses and trains and search for people without documents, within 100 miles of any external boundary in the US. Plus, what's behind the shortage of veterinarians in rural areas? And, we'll recap the week in state politics. In the year and a half since President Trump took office, we've been hearing about how federal authorities have been more aggressive in detaining and deporting unauthorized immigrants. You also may be hearing more terms and phrases around this issue - whether it's ICE, sanctuary cities, or family detentions. But there's another important term that you should know about - one that you might not have heard of: it's called "the border zone." It's an area where border patrol agents can get on buses and trains to search for people without documentation - all without a warrant. And as it turns out, most people in the US live within this area. To help us understand this, we were joined by Ed Yohnka, communications and public policy director with the ACLU of Illinois. "This authority that the Customs and Border Protection claims is something that is largely unchecked." - @eyohnka on the increased aggressiveness of immigration enforcement in the border zone — The 21st (@21stShow) July 9, 2018 Plus— If you ate meat this past Fourth of July, you have a veterinarian to thank for making sure it was safe. Vets in farm communities play a critical role in making sure the nation's livestock are free from diseases. But for years, there haven't been enough vets in hundreds of rural counties across the country. Esther Honig reported on this issue recently for Harvest Public Media. She's based at K-U-N-C in northern Colorado and joinrf us from there. Larry Firkins was also with us. He's associate dean of public engagement at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine. Why the shortage? We have a decreased number of farm-raised applicants, explains Dean Larry Firkins of @VetMedIllinois Plus, rural vets can expect to make half as much as their city counterparts, explains @estherhonig — The 21st (@21stShow) July 9, 2018 And— the Fourth of July holiday might have been right in the middle of last week, but there's still plenty of state politics news to get to. Governor Rauner visited Champaign-Urbana to apologize for some negative comments he made about the area - he and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel also got into a public spat over protests in Chicago this past weekend. And, there are also now officially two more candidates on the ballot for governor this fall. As we do every Monday, we're recapping the week in Illinois politics. Brian Mackey is Illinois Public Radio's statehouse reporter, Tony Arnold is a political reporter with WBEZ. "Fleece vests" vs "Carharts" — is that how you'll cast your vote? @BrianMackey muses#twill — The 21st (@21stShow) July 9, 2018

The 100-Mile 'Border Zone'; A Shortage Of Rural Veterinarians; Illinois Politics

The World Of Illinois' Chinese-American Food; The Best Illinois Movies

On this encore edition of the 21st: Niala sits down with food writers and radio hosts Monica Eng from WBEZ Chicago and Louisa Chu from The Chicago Tribune at Lee's Chop Suey to talk about the history of Chinese food in Chicago. Plus, we dive into the best movies in Illinois—at least, according to a poll by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. Food writers and radio hosts Monica Eng from WBEZ Chicago and Louisa Chu from The Chicago Tribune talked with us about Chinese food in Illinois. Both co-host the podcast Chewing, and they also both grew up in Chicago in the world of Chinese restaurants. Both Monica and Louisa's families owned and operated Chinese restaurants, and both journalists recently wrote pieces about their food heritage for The Chicago Tribune. So, we wanted to invite them to sit down to eat at a quintessential Chinese-American spot to talk about different styles of Chinese cuisine, whether or not chop suey is authentic and of course - what makes a good egg roll. We met at Lee's Chop Suey, which opened in 1968 in Chicago's Logan Square neighborhood. Wanna make your own egg foo young? It gets a bad rap, but @louisachu says try it. Here's her recipe:https://t.co/YwTM917uKI pic.twitter.com/pK1P5IArsg — The 21st (@21stShow) March 9, 2018 There are 3x more Chinese restaurants than McDonald's in the US. But, did you know they were almost extinct a century ago? via @monicaeng Photo @chicagotribune #chinesefood https://t.co/S1Ku1en5G3 pic.twitter.com/I7jGatnVPu — The 21st (@21stShow) March 9, 2018 Plus— The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum has put out a project called Top 200, to celebrate Illinois' 200th birthday. They've created 20 top 10 lists for residents to vote on. One of the categories was, naturally, movies. We chatted about Illinois' best movies—the top 3 of which, according to their poll, were The Blues Brothers, Ferris Bueller's Day Off, and A League Of Their Own—with Chris Wills, communications director with the Lincoln Museum and Library, along with research historian Christian McWhirter. .@CLMcWhirter on Ferris Bueller's Day Off: "When it came out, I was at the right age to be an adolescent jerk. It's a power fantasy for a high school kid!" — The 21st (@21stShow) March 16, 2018

The World Of Illinois' Chinese-American Food; The Best Illinois Movies

Ida B. Wells And The History of Black Women In Chicago; U of I 150 Keynote Speaker Amitav Ghosh

On this encore edition of the 21st: Remembering the history and legacy of Ida B. Wells and many other influential and inspirational black women in Chicago. Also, a conversation about climate change with Amitav Ghosh, an award-winning novelist who delivered the keynote at the University of Illinois 150 Conference. "The way to right wrongs is to turn the light of truth upon them". Those are the words of Ida B. Wells, a pioneering investigative journalist who was also one of the founders of the NAACP. She was born into slavery in Mississippi in 1862, but she moved to Memphis and eventually to Chicago. She was known for her journalism, which included documenting the many cases of lynching in the American South. She also fought for the right for women to vote and was one of the founders of the NAACP. Her story is one of many in Chicago that's being kept alive by new generations of activists and writers. We were joined by her great-grand daughter, Michelle Duster to talk about the life and legacy of Ida B. Wells, one of the most prominent black women in the history of Chicago. We were also joined by Mariame Kaba and Essence McDowell, co-writers of a book called "Lifting As They Climbed: Mapping a History of Black Women on Chicago's South Side - A Self-Guided Tour." Kaba is an organizer, educator and founder of the non-profit group Project NIA which works to end youth incarceration. McDowell is a digital artist and communications strategist. "The media at the time was racially segregated. We had a mainstream press that was a white press, and did not give deep coverage to issues that were facing the black community. And this was the time that Ida B. Wells began to cut her teeth as a journalist." —@LollyBowean — The 21st (@21stShow) April 10, 2018 Essence McDowell (@inspirationess), on what led her to work on the guidebook "Lifting As They Climbed." "It wasn't just the immense contributions that black women had made to the city, but it's also just these landmarks that are everywhere around us, that I had no idea existed." — The 21st (@21stShow) April 10, 2018 And— The question of whether our culture is coming to grips with climate change was brought up by award-winning novelist Amitav Ghosh in his most recent non-fiction book, "The Great Derangement; Climate Change and the Unthinkable." In the book, he explores our inability to grasp what he calls the "scale and violence" of climate change. Amitav is in Central Illinois was the keynote speaker at the Illinois 150 Conference. The three day conference is to celebrate U of I's 150th anniversary. He joined us in the studio to talk about his thoughts on climate change and cultural implications. "It's just a disaster waiting to happen...and it's not just waiting to happen. It happens constantly" - @GhoshAmitav on extreme weather events related to #climatechange He's the keynote speaker at @Illinois_Alma #ILLINOIS150 celebration. — The 21st (@21stShow) April 10, 2018

Ida B. Wells And The History of Black Women In Chicago; U of I 150 Keynote Speaker Amitav Ghosh

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