The Rambling Boy The Rambling Boy: Stories About Texas is a weekly look at regional history, hosted by Lonn Taylor of Fort Davis. Taylor is a writer and historian who moved to the Big Bend after retiring from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. in 2002. The show is broadcast Fridays at 11:00 a.m. on KRTS Marfa Public Radio.
The Rambling Boy

The Rambling Boy

From Marfa Public Radio

The Rambling Boy: Stories About Texas is a weekly look at regional history, hosted by Lonn Taylor of Fort Davis. Taylor is a writer and historian who moved to the Big Bend after retiring from the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. in 2002. The show is broadcast Fridays at 11:00 a.m. on KRTS Marfa Public Radio.More from The Rambling Boy »

Most Recent Episodes

Finnish Ski Troops During the Winter War

Finland is a small country. It covers 130,666 square miles, about half the size of Texas, and its population of 5.5 million people is about a fifth of that of Texas. On this episode of Rambling Boy, Lonn celebrates the centennial of Finnish independence from Russia, which was declared in the immediate aftermath of the Bolshevik Revolution on December 6, 1917. Lonn has a personal tie to the country. His wife's mother's uncle, Karl Wilhelm Kankkonen, immigrated to America in 1879 from the coastal town of Kokkola, Finland to Astoria, Oregon. Lonn and his wife will fly the Finnish flag all weekend long.

The Scottish Influence on Southerners

On this episode of The Rambling Boy, Lonn Taylor hypothesizes about why Americans, and especially Southerners, are so fascinated by all things Scottish, including kilts, tartans, and bagpipes. Lonn references an article which appeared in Harper's entitled "How Walter Scott Started the American Civil War" by Scott Horton. Horton argues convincingly that the Scottish novelist Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), is responsible for the popularity of all things Scottish in the American South. Scott invented the historical novel and during his lifetime published 21 novels and 12 books of poetry. Most of the novels were set in Scotland and most dealt with chivalry, knights in armor, feudal times, or...

A Cornucopia of First Thanksgivings

As children, we were taught that the first Thanksgiving took place in 1621 in Plymouth, Massachusetts. But some historians theorize that the first Thanksgiving meal may have happened elsewhere...including the Lone Star state. On the day after Turkey Day, Lonn fills us in on some of the other "first Thanksgivings." One such story, comes from Gaspar Pérez de Villagrá's Historia de la Nueva México. Villagrá's account of the Mass of Thanksgiving takes place on April 30, 1598, when the colonizer of New Mexico, Juan de Oñate, and his five hundred colonists held a meal on the north bank of the Rio Grande. Villagrá, who was an eyewitness, described how the Te Deum was sung, fanfares sou...

Lost in Translation

Living near the border lends lots of opportunities for cross-cultural humor. In this episode of The Rambling Boy, Lonn Taylor tells some of his favorite bilingual jokes and stories.

Texas Goes Nuts for Pecans

November in Texas is the month for pecans, according to Lonn Taylor. On this week's episode of Rambling Boy, Lonn talks about the nuts' history in the region as well as his own calamitous foray into commercial pecan growing.

A Story About the Strangest Outlaw in Texas

On this week's episode of Rambling Boy, Lonn Taylor recalls the story of Henry "Baldy" Russell, the strangest outlaw in Texas.

A Story About the Strangest Outlaw in Texas

Family Tales of East Texas

What happens when you combine 'Southern pride and a propensity towards violence'? Lonn Taylor has the answers - and some interesting family stories from East Texas - on this episode of Rambling Boy.

Curious or incurious?

This week on Rambling Boy, historian Lonn Taylor discusses the two types of people he sees in the world: the curious and the incurious.

From Skunks Punk to Prolific Writer

On this episode of Rambling Boy, Lonn Taylor highlights the life and career of Skunks bandleader Jesse Sublett who went on to become one of Texas's most prolific writers.

Columbus's greatest biographer, Samuel Eliot Morison

In honor of Colombus Day, this week Lonn Taylor discusses the explorer's greatest biographer Samuel Eliot Morison, a Harvard history professor and the expedition that inspired his work.

Columbus's greatest biographer, Samuel Eliot Morison

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