Think Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
Think

Think

From KERA

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.More from Think »

Most Recent Episodes

The Many Ways Presidents Leave The White House

With Democrats set to take control of the U.S. House of Representatives in January, some are already banging the drum for impeachment hearings for President Trump. David Priess, who served in both the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush White Houses, joins host Krys Boyd to take a historical look at presidential removal. His new book is called "How to Get Rid of a President: History's Guide to Removing Unpopular, Unable, or Unfit Chief Executives" (PublicAffairs).

The Surprising Future Of American Jews

American Jews have established themselves in virtually every facet of American life. And that integration opens up a new set of challenges. Harvard Law professor Robert H. Mnookin joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how intermarriage, decreased religious observance and varying views on Israel are threatening American Jewish identity. His new book is called "The Jewish American Paradox: Embracing Choices in a Changing World" (PublicAffairs).

Rethinking Recycling

The United States recycles about 34 percent of its waste – a number that hasn't increased much in decades. Beth Porter, climate and recycling director for Green America, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about recycling strategies for both individuals and municipalities, which she writes about in "Reduce, Reuse, Reimagine: Sorting Out the Recycling System" (Rowman & Littlefield).

Want To Kill The Middle Class? Try Tariffs

Earlier this month, the United States and China called a temporary truce in the countries' months-long trade war, though difficult negotiations are required for the peace to hold. Matthew Rooney, managing director of the Bush Institute-SMU Economic Growth Initiative, joins host Krys Boyd to make the case that excessive tariffs raise prices, kill jobs and inhibit innovation, which he writes about in the current issue of The Catalyst.

Why Your Grandma Says That

Every weekend, Martha Barnett and Grant Barrett take a deep dive into the nuances of how we communicate with each other on their public radio show "A Way With Words." They join us to talk about what they've learned about the regional and generational differences in how we talk – and to talk with listeners about their own language curiosities.

Erasing The Link Between Art And Architecture

Daniel Libeskind designed New York's World Trade Center Redevelopment and many, many other significant projects around the world. He joins us to talk about his approach to architecture – and why he says anyone can do it. His new book on his life's work is called "Edge of Order" (Clarkson Porter).

Who Or Whom? Who Cares.

As much as our English teachers would like us to follow the laws of grammar, language has a way of developing organically. Lane Greene joins us to talk about how language evolves despite all those rules, which he writes about in "Talk on the Wild Side: Why Language Can't Be Tamed" (Economist Books).

The Ethics Of Editing Babies

Late last month, Chinese researcher He Jiankui opened a Pandora's Box with his announcement that he's edited the genes of twin girls. Science writer Ed Yong joins us to talk about how the prospect of designer babies has rocked the scientific community, which he writes about for The Atlantic.

How White Gatekeepers Restrain Black Thinkers

In a new essay, Mychal Denzel Smith writes, "The white audience does not seek out black public intellectuals to challenge their worldview; instead they are meant to serve as tour guides through a foreign experience that the white audience wishes to keep at a comfortable distance." Smith joins us to talk about how black writers from James Baldwin to Ta-Nehisi Coates consider the race of their readers – and about they can sometimes be muted by white gatekeepers – which he writes about in the current issue of Harper's magazine.

Trading A C-Suite For A Cop's Beat

As enforcers of the law, police officers are charged with leading exemplary lives – even as they interact with criminals on a daily basis. Sarah Cortez has spent two decades as a beat cop – a profession she took up after a career climbing the corporate ladder. She joins host us to talk about her personal reflections of what it means to protect and serve, the subject of "Tired, Hungry, Standing in One Spot for Twelve Hours: Essential Cop Essays" (Texas Review Press).

Back To Top