Think Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
Think

Think

From KERA

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.More from Think »

Most Recent Episodes

Computer Scientists Are Obsessed With Termites

Termites gobble up $40 billion worth of our stuff annually. Lisa Margonelli joins host joins to talk about these largely misunderstood insects, whose collective power may one day actually be harnessed for good. Her new book is called "Underbug: An Obsessive Tale of Termites and Technology" (Farrar, Straus and Giroux).

The Forgotten Poverty Of Rural Whites

Sarah Smarsh grew up in a long line of poor wheat farmers in rural Kansas. She joins us to talk about how working-class poverty stretches across generations – and about our troubling tendency as a nation to judge people based on their wealth. Her new book is called "Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth" (Scribner).

Why America Should Take Care Of The World

As part of his "America First" policy, President Trump has pushed for a reduction in our involvement in global affairs. Robert Kagan of the Brookings Institution joins us to make the case that this strategy leaves a leadership void that will likely make the world a more unstable place. His new book is called "The Jungle Grows Back: America and Our Imperiled World" (Knopf).

Can A Carbon Tax Curb Climate Change?

A report released last week by the United Nations predicts climate change could lead to worsening food shortages and a host of natural disasters as soon as 2040. Jeff Nesbit, executive director of Climate Nexus, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the massive worldwide adjustments necessary to curb these effects – and if a carbon tax is part of the answer. His new book is called "This is the Way the World Ends: How Droughts and Die-Offs, Heat Waves and Hurricanes are Converging on America" (St. Martin's Press).

The Risk Of Government Brain Drain

Much of our attention to government focuses on the Senate confirmation of judges and senior officials. Michael Lewis joins us to talk about the grunts who keep the federal government machine moving — and about how that machine is in danger of grinding to a halt, which he writes about in "The Fifth Risk" (W.W. Norton & Company).

A Soldier, A Ghost, Shared Love And Betrayal

Eden Malcolm spends each day in his hospital bed, unable to communicate with his wife and young daughter. That is until the day he wakes up alone and rediscovers the spark of life. Eden is the creation of Elliot Ackerman, who joins us to tell the story of a soldier coming to grips with his life both before and after war. Ackerman's new novel is called "Waiting for Eden" (Knopf).

Us Vs. Them (And Everyone Else In The Middle)

It feels as if America is split down the middle between liberals and conservatives. The truth, though, is that we're divided into even more significant, smaller factions. Researcher Daniel Yudkin joins us to take a more accurate and nuanced look at what separates us from our fellow Americans. He's an author of the report "Hidden Tribes: A Study of America's Polarized Landscape," which was produced by More in Common.

The History of Impeachment

Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton each served as president of the United States — and each faced impeachment while in office. Jeffrey A. Engel, director of the Center for Presidential History at SMU, joins us to take a balanced look at the practice, which offers a check on tyrants while also nullifying the will of the voters. He's a contributor to "Impeachment: An American History" (Modern Library).

Gaslighting: The Abuse Is Real

"Gaslighting" is the manipulative technique sociopaths, narcissists and others use to control people. Family counselor Stephanie Moulton Sarkis joins us to talk about how we can spot this pattern of lies, distractions and distortions of the truth, which she writes about in "Gaslighting: Recognize Manipulative and Emotionally Abusive People – And Break Free" (Lifelong Books).

Why We Can't Get No Satisfaction

The self-help industry exists to make us think we could be living our best lives if only we tried a little harder and spent a little more. Heather Havrilesky joins us to make the case that we should embrace our imperfections and come to peace with the idea that maybe we are who we are for a reason. Her new collection of essays is called "What If This Were Enough?" (Doubleday).

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