Think Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
Think

Think

From KERA

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.More from Think »

Most Recent Episodes

Why Juries Don't Follow Judges' Instructions

Defendants who see their cases go to trial know a lots at risk considering their fates will be decided by 12 people who would rather be anywhere else. Drury Sherrod is a social psychologist and jury consultant, and he joins host Krys Boyd to talk about strategies for improving jury trials to ensure fair decisions. His new book is called"The Jury Crisis: What's Wrong with Jury Trials and How We Can Save Them"(Rowman & Littlefield).

The Woman Writing Black Panther

Nigerian-American writer Nnedi Okorafor is best known for her novella "Binti" and novel "Who Fears Death," which will be adapted into a television series for HBO. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about writing black characters into popular culture – including her recent work on the Marvel "Black Panther" franchise.

The Excuse For Racism In Hollywood? Money

With the#OscarsSoWhite campaign and increased calls for inclusion riders, Hollywood is beginning to more closely consider how people of color are represented in the industry. University of Georgia assistant professor of sociology and African American studies Maryann Erigha joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how decisions made behind the scenes affect what audiences see on the screen. Her new book is called"The Hollywood Jim Crow: The Racial Politics of the Movie Industry"(NYU Press).

The Unseen Creatures We Live With

Sterilize your kitchen counters all you want: You'll never be rid of the thousands of tiny organisms who live alongside us. Biologist Rob Dunn joins us to introduce us to the creatures small and smaller who inhabit the same spaces we do. His new book is called"Never Home Alone: From Microbes to Millipedes, Camel Crickets, and Honeybees, the Natural History of Where We Live"(Basic Books).

Wildlife, The Environment And The Casualties Of War

For decades, Afghanistan has been one of the most war-torn places on Earth. Evolutionary biologist Alex Dehgan has dedicated his career to protecting the country's unique environment and wildlife population from human destruction, and he joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the effect that war has on an area's natural landscape. His new book is called "The Snow Leopard Project: And Other Adventures in Warzone Conservation" (PublicAffairs).

Talking About A Woman's Gender Won't Get Her Elected

Democratic candidates are already positioning themselves as challengers to President Trump in 2020. And the field is led by a number of high-profile women, including senators Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand and Amy Klobuchar. Linda Hirshman joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the sexism surrounding our conversation about the electability of female candidates, which she writes about for the Washington Post.

For A Better Life, Think About Dying

Most of us plan for the ends of our lives by just putting the idea out of our minds. Katy Butler joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how we can better manage our later years and maintain a high quality of living even at the end. Her new book is called "The Art of Dying Well: A Practical Guide to a Good End of Life" (Scribner).

To Fix The House, Add More Reps

One thing every American can agree on is that we're living in a particularly divided political landscape. Daily Beast columnist Michael Tomasky joins host Krys Boyd to talk about ideas that might bridge the gap – from ranked-choice voting to at-large congressional districts. His new book is called"If We Can Keep It: How the Republic Collapsed and How it Might Be Saved"(Liveright).

What You Don't Know About Marie Kondo

Marie Kondo has been equal parts sensation and curiosity with her book on organizing and subsequent Netflix series. Margaret Dilloway grew up with one Asian parent and one white parent, and she joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how Shinto beliefs influenced Kondo – and about what it's like to see the Kondo phenomenon from two perspectives. Her essay"What White, Western Audiences Don't Understand About Marie Kondo's 'Tidying Up'"appears in The Huffington Post.

A Century Of Protest Songs

Protest songs are arguably most closely associated with the Civil Rights movement and the Vietnam War. James Sullivan joins host Krys Boyd to trace the evolution of these songs – from the early days of World War I to the present, which he writes about in"Which Side Are You On? 20th Century American History in 100 Protest Songs"(Oxford University Press).

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