Think Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
Think

Think

From KERA

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Most Recent Episodes

Money and magnetism: Inside the lives of door-to-door salespeople

Door-to-door salesmen are often reviled, but some are turning the profession into an art form. New Yorker staff writer Tad Friend joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the tactics of today's D2D salesmen and how they perfect their pitches for what might be one of the hardest jobs in the world. His feature on one of the country's most tenacious salesmen is called "Sam Taggart's Hard Sell."

Mourning a loved one is complicated by suicide

After her mother's suicide, Laura Trujillo faced a reckoning. Trujillo is managing editor for Life and Entertainment at USA Today, and she joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the shock she faced when her mother took her own life, the dark secret she had to plumb to move forward, and where she ultimately found peace. Her book is "Stepping Back from the Ledge: A Daughter's Search for Truth and Renewal."

Would you really be happier with someone else?

Does the modern quest for personal happiness ruin perfectly good marriages? Joshua Coleman is a psychologist in private practice and a senior fellow with the Council on Contemporary Families. He joins host Krys Boyd to discuss how our culture of individualism puts pressure on relationships, feeling like a failure for not being able to repair a faltering marriage, and how to know it's time to walk away. His article in Aeon is called "The Right Person."

When did parenting get so competitive?

June Cleaver made parenting look so simple, while perfect soccer moms today can make it seem unachievably hard. Andrew Bomback is an associate professor of medicine at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, and he joins host Krys Boyd to discuss how parenting became a verb, why we're stuck on the notion that parents can have it all, and how to break free of the intense cultural pressure surrounding parenting. His book is "Long Days, Short Years: A Cultural History of Modern Parenting."

Who takes care of you when you die?

Many of us do all we can to avoid thinking about death. But what if every day you went to work and death was part of your job? Journalist Hayley Campbell joins host Krys Boyd to talk about people who deal exclusively in death – from homicide detectives to gravediggers – and to ask why death remains a taboo subject in Western culture. Her book is "All the Living and the Dead: From Embalmers to Executioners, an Exploration of the People Who Have Made Death Their Life's Work."

What it's like being autistic in a neurotypical world

It's fairly common for a person with autism to "mask" their condition so as to appear to be neurotypical. Devon Price is a social psychologist and professor at Loyola University of Chicago's School of Continuing and Professional Studies. He joins host Krys Boyd to discuss his own experience with neurodivergence – and to delve into the lives of people who feel ignored and invisible. His book is "Unmasking Autism: Discovering the New Faces of Neurodiversity."

Why Americans are giving up on college

Americans owe trillions in student loan debt, even as education is seen as a public good. Will Bunch, national opinion columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the origins of the college dream of equal opportunity, its funding failures and how degrees are now a source of cultural division. His book is "After the Ivory Tower Falls: How College Broke the American Dream and Blew Up Our Politics—and How to Fix It."

From the archives: The case for talking about race at work

Corporations are looking to implement anti-racist policies within their organizations – and some of that work involves actually talking with the people who work there. Y-Vonne Hutchinson is the CEO and founder of ReadySet, a diversity, equity, and inclusion consulting firm, and she talks to host Krys Boyd about how employees can have frank and honest conversations with management about race and achieve real results. Her book is "How to Talk to Your Boss About Race: Speaking Up Without Getting Shut Down." This episode originally aired on March 1, 2022.

Why guns are deadlier than ever

The gun control debate often focuses on the number of bullets a weapon can fire at one time. Phil Klay joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the technology that has allowed guns to evolve from single shooters to automatic weapons, and to talk about why we've felt the need to make guns even more deadly. His article in The New Yorker is called "How Did Guns Get So Powerful?"

Black Native Americans work to reclaim their identity

The Creek Nation recognized Black people as full citizens until that ruling was revoked in the 1970s. Caleb Gayle is a journalist and professor at Northeastern University. He joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the struggle for Black Creeks to regain tribal recognition, how the government was involved, and how Black Creeks see themselves today. His book is "We Refuse to Forget: A True Story of Black Creeks, American Identity, and Power."