Think Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
Think

Think

From KERA

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.

Most Recent Episodes

The number one killer of creativity is fear

The rigor of scientific research might have unlocked the mystery of the creative spark. Pulitzer-Prize winning New York Times science reporter Matt Richtel joins host Krys Boyd to talk about creativity and what awakens it, the conditions where it thrives and what happens when it's blocked. His book is "Inspired: Understanding Creativity: A Journey Through Art, Science, and the Soul."

Inside a mind with severe ADHD

A diagnosis of severe ADHD can be hard to swallow, but it can also offer a new understanding of yourself. Rebecca Schiller is co-founder and trustee of the human rights organization Birthrights and a regular contributor to The Guardian. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about her journey to be seen by specialists and about learning to navigate her life in a new way. Her book is "A Thousand Ways to Pay Attention: A Memoir of Coming Home to My Neurodivergent Mind."

Has the digital world broken American democracy?

It's pretty clear at this point that social media connects us and also divides us. Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt joins host Krys Boyd to discuss how tech companies have sowed rifts and how he says the communication breakdown means we are now being ruled by mob dynamics. His article in The Atlantic is called "After Babel."

The next disaster is coming. Are you ready?

From extreme weather events to plane crashes, disasters are always looming. Juliette Kayyem is Robert and Renee Belfer Senior Lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, where she is faculty director of the Homeland Security Project and the Security and Global Health Project. She joins host Krys Boyd to discuss her approach to crisis management and why she feels like we're always a step behind. Her book is "The Devil Never Sleeps: Learning to Live in an Age of Disasters."

What a nurse didn't know until she became a patient

A diagnosis of breast cancer meant a nurse became the patient. Theresa Brown is an author and registered nurse, and she joins host Krys Boyd to discuss being on the other side of treatments, her frustrations with being reduced to her disease, and her worries that speaking up would make her a difficult patient and alienate the very doctors trying to save her. Her book is called "Healing: When a Nurse Becomes a Patient."

Dying insects and migrating trees: our planet in peril

Of all the species on Earth, humans have easily had the biggest impact. This hour, we'll look at how our actions have affected everything from the bug population to the plants and trees many animals call home. And we'll talk about the possibility of reviving creatures that have gone extinct.... and if we should?

How Shakespeare killed off his characters

To be or not to be? That might be a better question for science than Shakespeare. Kathryn Harkup joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the many ways The Bard killed off his characters, their feasibility in real life and how audiences of the day would've reacted to the dramatic demises. Her book is "Death By Shakespeare: Snakebites, Stabbings and Broken Hearts."

Beyond batteries: What we need to store renewable energy

If there is to be a shift to renewable energy, there must be a focus on developing batteries that can meet the challenge. New Yorker contributing writer Matthew Hutson joins host Krys Boyd to discuss why there needs to be 100-times more storage for renewables by 2040, and why that goal is currently out of reach. His article is "The Renewable-Energy Revolution Will Need Renewable Storage."

A Planet Money journalist on the man who made bond trading sexy

The bond market is high risk, high reward and cutthroat. Mary Childs is co-host and correspondent for NPR's "Planet Money" podcast. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about Bill Gross, known as "The Bond King," his rise to the top of a volatile world and his eventual undoing. Her book is "The Bond King: How One Man Made a Market, Built an Empire, and Lost It All."

Your attitude about aging could be a self-fulfilling prophecy

It might not be aging that causes health decline, but ageism. Becca Levy is a professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health and a professor of psychology at Yale. She joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the beliefs around aging and how policy changes and positive thinking can create successful outcomes. Her book is "Breaking the Age Code: How Your Beliefs About Aging Determine How Long and Well You Live."