Think Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
Think

Think

From KERA

Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.More from Think »

Most Recent Episodes

The Terrorist Turned Informant

Aimen Dean was an early member of al-Qaeda, working alongside founder Osama bin Laden himself. He joins us to talk about his decision to switch allegiances and provide information to Britain's intelligence services, which he writes about in "Nine Lives: My Time as the West's Top Spy" (Oneworld Publications).

How Society Fails Trans Kids

Children as young as 2 years old can find themselves at odds with the gender assigned to them at birth. Sociologist Ann Travers joins us to talk about the experience of transgender kids – and about how parents can guide their discovery. Travers' book is called "The Trans Generation: How Trans Kids (and Their Parents) are Creating a Gender Revolution" (NYU Press).

Immigrants On Their Earliest Memories Of America

The First Days Project invites United States immigrants to document their earliest memories of their new home – what scared them, what surprised them and what they found confusing. Samip Mallick runs the project, and he joins us to talk about what can be learned about the immigrant experience by collecting their stories.

Who You Should (And Shouldn't) Trust For Health Advice

Medical research can be nuanced, inconclusive or just plain tricky to explain clearly. University of Pennsylvania professor Paul Offit joins us to talk about how people with agendas often take scientific studies and twist the information to suit their needs. His new book is called "Bad Advice: Or Why Celebrities, Politicians, and Activists Aren't Your Best Source of Health Information" (Columbia University Press).

In An Era of Change, Evangelicals Still Rule

As America becomes more and more diverse, white evangelical voters showed in 2016 that candidates they back still win elections. University of Maryland political scientist Janelle S. Wong joins us to talk about the future of evangelical voting as immigrants increasingly join their churches. Her new book is called "Immigrants, Evangelicals, and Politics in an Era of Demographic Change" (Russell Sage Foundation).

Rethinking Our Relationship With Animals

Animals serve humans as laborers, food sources and, in some cases, companions. Michigan State law professor David Favre joins us to think through our evolving relationship with our fellow inhabitants of Earth, which he writes about in "Respecting Animals: A Balanced Approach to Our Relationship with Pets, Food, and Wildlife" (Prometheus Books).

Lessons From the Opioid Epidemic

When parents are addicted to opioids, it's often their children who pay the biggest price. In West Virginia, 6,300 kids are in the foster care system — nearly half because of their parents' substance-abuse problems. Zoë Carpenter visited the state to investigate the ripple effect the opioid crisis is having on children, and she joins us to talk about what she learned. Her story "Lessons from the Opioid Epidemic" appears in The Nation.

The Doctor Who Exposed The Flint Water Crisis

A few years back, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha felt perfectly comfortable telling parents it was fine for their kids to drink the town's water. Flint, Michigan was a part of America, wasn't it? She joins us to tell the story of how she evolved from passive pediatrician to investigator of the city's water supply and activist for the public's health. Her new book is called "What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City" (One World).

Cheaters: Why Women And Men Stray

When a spouse cheats, it often means the end of the relationship. Dr. Kenneth Rosenberg joins us to talk about the three types of cheating, why they're so prevalent and how we can overcome them. His new book is called "Infidelity: Why Men and Women Cheat" (DaCapo).

Why Do We Care If A Boy Wears A Dress?

Young women are taught that they need to be assertive, strong and brave in a world dominated by men. So why doesn't it work the other way? Sarah Rich joins us to talk about why we should also be teaching boys how to be nurturing, caring and other traits typically associated with femininity. Her story"Today's Masculinity Is Stifling"appears in The Atlantic.

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