CuriosiD Have a question about Detroit, our region or the people who live here? Anything you've always wondered about, found strange or downright confusing that you would like WDET to answer?Meet CuriosiD - a series for the inquisitive. You ask the questions and our news team helps you find answers.Submit your question at wdet.org/curious
CuriosiD

CuriosiD

From WDET 101.9 FM

Have a question about Detroit, our region or the people who live here? Anything you've always wondered about, found strange or downright confusing that you would like WDET to answer?Meet CuriosiD - a series for the inquisitive. You ask the questions and our news team helps you find answers.Submit your question at wdet.org/curious

Most Recent Episodes

CuriosiD: Did you know the Dust Bowl made it to Detroit?

One WDET listener asks if the Dust Bowl ever made its way to Detroit. Spoiler alert: It did!

CuriosiD: What's the Origin of the Boston Cooler?

In this week's episode of CuriosiD, where WDET answers your questions about Detroit and the region, Dan Golodner from Huntington Woods asks: "I moved from Washington, D.C. to Detroit in the mid-'90. And I've always loved the root beer float and people said, 'You have to try the Boston Cooler.' So, I tried it and was like, 'What's the deal here? Why's it called a Boston Cooler and not a ginger ale cooler or something like that? I'm just curious." Dan Golodner, Huntington Woods The Short Answer: The term "Boston Cooler" has a complicated history dating back at least as early as 1889. The way the drink was made and what it consisted of went through a few different iterations before it settled on the Vernors and vanilla ice-cream combination that we know today. At some point in the 1920s, Boston Cooler could refer to any sort of soda-pop and ice cream combination. For instance, Hires, a root beer company, promoted their own version of the Boston Cooler.

CuriosiD: We Answered All Your Questions About the Mile Road System

Over the years, listeners have been curious about Metro Detroit's mile roads. Some have asked if they're really one mile apart. Others wonder why some are not called "mile" roads. Angela Hoffman lives on Three Mile Drive and wants to know how her street got its name.

Holocaust Bones Find Resting Place in Massive Michigan Cemetery

A cemetery and final resting place for some of the most significant remains in Jewish history is the subject of the latest episode of WDET's series CuriosiD.

Listeners Ask, Why Does DTW Have Those Giant Fans?

At Detroit Metro Airport – on the way to the McNamara [Mack-Nuh-MARE-uh] Terminal there's a tunnel with large fans. Many travelers have wondered why the fans were there. Two WDET listeners contacted us to find out more. As part of the station's CuriosiD series... WDET's Laura Herberg looked into it with them.

CuriosiD: Why Isn't Google's Street View of Detroit Up-to-date?

I'm looking to transition to Detroit to start a new business and it's difficult to determine the quality and density of the neighborhoods on Google Maps Street View because they haven't been updated since 2013 and sometimes even longer. I'd like to know why that is. Why haven't the maps been updated?

Why Does Michigan Avenue Have Brick Pavers?

WDET listener Dan Lombardo asks, why there are brick pavers at Michigan and Trumbull and if they are original or if they are something they redo every now and then.

Could Electric Cars Increase Pollution

As part of WDET's series CuriosID, a listener wonders if driving an electric car could actually create more pollution, since it would force power plants to generate more electricity to charge it, thereby generating more smog.

Rumor of a British Bomber Crash In a Detroit Neighborhood Haunts a Listener

A British plane had a catastrophic electrical failure over Canada while flying to a training mission in Nebraska on Oct.. 24, 1958.

Rumor of a British Bomber Crash In a Detroit Neighborhood Haunts a Listener

Why Is Detroit Sometimes Called "The Paris of the Midwest?"

Detroit's French connection is more than 300 years old, but is the comparison a modern invention?