On Second Thought On Second Thought is a one hour, daily news talk show, airing at 9 a.m. ET weekdays on Georgia Public Broadcasting. Timely conversations about all topics relating to Georgia including politics, healthcare, education, music, literature and race. We bring you stories you won't hear elsewhere and voices that are often ignored. The show has a no-pundit policy because we're interested in information, not talking points. On Second Thought incorporates the comments and ideas of listeners into its stories, and welcomes input from the Georgia community. Stream live at www.gpb.org/radio at 9am ET Monday-Friday.
On Second Thought

On Second Thought

From Georgia Public Broadcasting

On Second Thought is a one hour, daily news talk show, airing at 9 a.m. ET weekdays on Georgia Public Broadcasting. Timely conversations about all topics relating to Georgia including politics, healthcare, education, music, literature and race. We bring you stories you won't hear elsewhere and voices that are often ignored. The show has a no-pundit policy because we're interested in information, not talking points. On Second Thought incorporates the comments and ideas of listeners into its stories, and welcomes input from the Georgia community. Stream live at www.gpb.org/radio at 9am ET Monday-Friday.

Most Recent Episodes

'Fault Lines' Details The Roots of Political Divisiveness In American Politics

Any thorough study of history reveals that there have always been political, economic and racial divisions in the United States. Princeton historians and best-selling authors Julian Zelizer and Kevin Kruse add gender and sexuality to those fissures. Their book, Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, follows how those divisions have become wider and deeper since the resignation of Richard Nixon shook the foundations of our democracy.

'Fault Lines' Details The Roots of Political Divisiveness In American Politics

Author Samantha Allen's Road Trip Through Red States Stops At AJC Decatur Book Festival

Author and journalist Samantha Allen wanted to go beyond the headlines in her new book, "Real Queer America: LGBT Stories from Red States." Now, she's traveling to the AJC Decatur Book Festival . "Often the stories we hear are just, 'Oh, this anti-LGBT law got passed' or 'This anti-LGBT law got stopped,' and we're not really seeing what's happening on the ground," Allen said.

Author Samantha Allen's Road Trip Through Red States Stops At AJC Decatur Book Festival

Travel Channel's Spirited 'Ghost Brothers' Dying To Chase The Departed

Picture this: It's Friday night. You're all alone and suddenly hear creepy noices — maybe even see shadows from the corner of your eye. Who ya gonna call? The Ghost Brothers are Atlanta-based. The trio of fraternity brothers started investigating places reported to be haunted on reality television in 2016. Their new series, Ghost Brothers: Haunted Houseguests, investigates residential phenomena.

On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019

To write her book, Real Queer America , Samantha Allen traveled red states as a transgender women and formed unexpected connections with the people she met. Now, she's traveling to the AJC Decatur Book Festival . Hear her take on finding tolerance and understanding on both sides of the LGBTQ rights debate.

Julia Phillips' Debut Novel 'Disappearing Earth' Reimagines Detective Fiction

Surrounded by mountains and the sea, Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula is extremely isolated; there aren't even roads or rail lines to the area. In Julia Phillips' new novel, it's the site where two young Russian sisters vanish one afternoon after walking along the seashore. Disappearing Earth is not a mystery or true crime novel. There's no detective discovering long-held secrets among the townsfolk, no red herrings nor a final reveal. Instead, the novel explores a series of stories about women and

Julia Phillips' Debut Novel 'Disappearing Earth' Reimagines Detective Fiction

UGA Gliders Dive Deep To Improve Hurricane Predictions

Forecasters predict a more active hurricane season this year, now that the El Nino weather pattern has ended. Current predictions estimate as many as 10 to 17 possible named storms. Getting accurate models of a hurricane's path plays a big part in coastal communities' ability to stay safe. Researchers at the University of Georgia aim to improve the precision of these models by launching underwater autonomous gliders to collect data from the briny deep.

Video Game Violence Once United Political Parties. Why Is It A Partisan Issue Now?

In the aftermath of mass shootings, debate over why these massacres keep happening — and how to fix them — bubbles up again. And, after the shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, President Donald Trump again pointed to mental illness and violent video games. Politicians singling out video games for inspiring violence isn't new. (Nor is the research debunking this connection .) In the past, however, moral outrage and blame came from both sides of the political aisle. Now, a recent article

Video Game Violence Once United Political Parties. Why Is It A Partisan Issue Now?

On Second Thought For Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2019

UGA is using underwater gliders, a kind of autonomous robot, to collect data to help better predict hurricanes. Previous models based on satellite data could easily see water temperature at the surface, but glider data now adds important measures from below the surface that can impact the strength of hurricanes. On Second Thought talks to Catherine Edwards, assistant professor at UGA's Skidaway Institute of Oceanography.

Judge Orders Paper-Based Georgia Elections For 2020 Onward

Federal Judge Amy Totenberg has ruled Georgia will use its outdated voting machines for one more election . Then, it's time for a change. Georgia is currently one of five states that relies on electronic voting machines, but officials are currently working to implement a new $107 million ballot-marking device system that includes touchscreen machines with a printed paper ballot component. A lawsuit filed in 2017 says the current touchscreen direct-recording electronic (DRE) voting system is

On Second Thought For Monday, Aug. 16, 2019

Judge Amy Totenberg has ruled Georgia will use its outdated voting machines for one more election. Then, it's time for change. Delve into the 153-page ruling with GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler . A metro Atlanta police department is trying out a pilot program to help opioid users go to treatment facilities instead of jail. Travel there for the story with GPB's Ellen Eldridge .

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