Political Rewind: More cases of the omicron variant found in U.S.; effects on travel, schools in Ga.

Friday on Political Rewind: We looked at the latest news about the coronavirus. We tackled your questions about the new omicron variant, and where it is likely is it to become the dominant strain of COVID in Georgia. How will schools, public spaces and travel change in the coming months? The Panelists: Nicole Carr — Reporter, ProPublica Dr. Jodi Guest — Vice chair of the department of epidemiology in the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University Andy Miller — Editor, Georgia Health News Patricia Murphy — Political writer and columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: More cases of the omicron variant found in U.S.; effects on travel, schools in Ga.

Political Rewind: What you need to know about Abrams' run; Supreme Court discusses abortion access

Georgia Democrats are expressing excitement and relief now that Stacey Abrams has declared she is running for governor next year. Some Republicans welcomed the news, too. They claim Abrams will energize their base to turn out and vote against her. Longtime observers of the Supreme Court say the right to an abortion may be in jeopardy after they heard the justices' comments and questions in yesterday's Mississippi court hearing. And it's now clear that local runoff elections around the state this week favored many challengers over incumbents — in some races, voters were looking for fresh, younger leaders. Panelists: Amy Steigerwalt — professor of political science, Georgia State University Fred Smith — professor of constitutional law, Emory University Tammy Greer — political science professor, Clark Atlanta University Kevin Riley — editor, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: What you need to know about Abrams' run; Supreme Court discusses abortion access

Political Rewind: U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments today that could reshape abortion access in Ga.

Wednesday on Political Rewind: The United States Supreme Court takes up one of its most significant cases in decades today, Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. The Mississippi case could overturn the landmark decision giving women the right to choose how to deal with their own pregnancies. A conservative court could abandon Roe v. Wade, which has been the law of the land since 1973. Our panel discussed the arguments on both sides of the case and take a deep dive into the history of abortion rights before and after Roe. What happens if states are left to make their own laws about the legality of abortion? How will the eventual decision in the Mississippi impact Georgia's own restrictive abortion law? But first: Atlanta city councilmember Andre Dickens was elected the next Mayor of Atlanta. What can we expect from his tenure in the job? Panelists: Greg Bluestein — Political reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Dr. Karen Owen — Political science professor, University of West Georgia Dr. Randy Beck — Professor of constitutional law, University of Georgia Dr. Subasri Narasimhan — Professor in Rolling School of Public Health and Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Reproductive Health Research in the Southeast, Emory University

Political Rewind: U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments today that could reshape abortion access in Ga.

Political Rewind: Voting in runoff elections in Atlanta, across state; Will it be Kemp vs. Abrams?

Tuesday on Political Rewind: Voters head to the polls in runoff elections in communities across Georgia. Elections include mayoral races in four cities, including Atlanta and Brunswick, Ga. The 2021 races have drawn low turnout so far. "Less than 25% of registered voters in Atlanta voted in early November, and now you know you're seeing less than half that," Emory University professor Dr. Bernard Fraga said. "So I think the question is whether you're going to see a surge of turnout again in some of these swing areas." In other news, Gov. Brian Kemp won the endorsement of the Georgia Chamber of Commerce this week. During his previous gubernatorial bid in 2018, the influential business entity chose not to endorse him. Will their stamp of approval in the current race be helpful in a potential GOP primary from David Perdue? Panelists: Leroy Chapman — Managing editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Stephen Fowler — Politics reporter, GPB News Dr. Bernard Fraga — Professor of political science, Emory University Tamar Hallerman — Senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: Voting in runoff elections in Atlanta, across state; Will it be Kemp vs. Abrams?

Political Rewind: There's concern about a new COVID variant. And what's next for Glynn County?

Monday on Political Rewind: Scientists say there is much to learn about the dangers of the new omicron variant of the coronavirus. They urge a redoubled effort to vaccinate in states like Georgia, where hesitance at getting the shots continues. Meanwhile, residents in Brunswick and Glynn County go about their lives in aftermath of the Ahmaud Arbery murder trial. According to local organizers, there is a heightened awareness of solving social justice problems along coastal Georgia. Plus, U.S. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene is unhappy with her new congressional district lines. So are a good many of her new constituents. Meanwhile, the Board of Regents refuses to rename buildings with ties to slavery and segregation on campuses across the state. Panelists: Dr. Heather Farley — Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice, Public Policy and Management, College of Coastal Georgia Jim Galloway — Former politics columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Raisa Habersham — Investigative reporter, Savannah Morning News Dr. Audrey Haynes — Political science professor, University of Georgia

Political Rewind: There's concern about a new COVID variant. And what's next for Glynn County?

Political Rewind: The Arbery Verdict and What it Means for Social Justice in Georgia, the Nation

Friday on Political Rewind: A verdict in a trial from a small town in Georgia gripped the nation. Travis McMichael, Gregory McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan were found guilty of murder charges on Wednesday. In February 2020, the three men chased Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man, in pickup trucks as he jogged in a Coastal Georgia neighborhood. Travis McMichael shot and killed Arbery during the chase. Bryan filmed the killing on his cellphone. Travis, the shooter, was found guilty on all nine counts. His father, Greg McMichael, was convicted on eight of the nine. Bryan was convicted on six counts. However, questions linger. This trial may never have happened, were it not for the shocking video that exposed the shooting and the failure of law enforcement to initially hold anyone accountable. Outside the courtroom following the verdict, the Rev. Al Sharpton told a crowd much work was left to be done. So what should we make of the outcome of the trial? Emory University professor Dr. Andra Gillespie said more consideration is needed of subtle examples of racism in society. "My concern in the grand scheme of things is when can we develop a consensus that racism manifests itself in ways that is not as obvious as a bunch of guys hunting a Black man as he's walking down the street," she said. "That's when I know that our society has made progress, and that's the thing that I'm still hopeful we can get there. Panelists: Margaret Coker — Editor-in-chief, The Current Dr. Andra Gillespie — Professor of political science and Director of the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference at Emory University Patricia Murphy — Politics columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: The Arbery Verdict and What it Means for Social Justice in Georgia, the Nation

Political Rewind: Closing arguments in Brunswick as eyes turn to jury; Lucy McBath eyes 7th District

Tuesday on Political Rewind: Questions about what constitutes legal self-defense and proper use of the citizens' arrest law dominated closing arguments in the trial of Gregory and Travis McMichael and William Roddie Bryan — the three white men charged with murder in Ahmaud Arbery's shooting death. Attention is on the jury as it prepares to deliberate on the evidence, but it was one defense lawyer's disparaging description of Arbery's appearance that sparked outrage from his family and many observers. Emory political science professor Dr. Andra Gillespie said the description of Arbery ties into a larger theme seen throughout the trial. "It reinforces this idea that Ahmaud Arbery stood out because people were uncomfortable with the fact that he was a Black man running through this neighborhood," Gillespie said. "And that is the reason why he was targeted in this case in the way that other people aren't. And that's not Arbery's problem. That is the defendant's problem in this particular case. It is our problem as a society that we should be able to allow Black people to go take a jog through a white neighborhood without having to worry about their lives being endangered." Meanwhile, the new Republican-drawn Georgia congressional map sets up a battle between Democratic incumbent U.S. Reps. Carolyn Bordeaux and Lucy McBath. With little chance to win in the newly drawn 6th District, McBath announced she is planning to run for Bordeaux's 7th District congressional seat. Also, a new poll of the Atlanta mayoral runoff sees Andre Dickens with a slight edge ahead of Felicia Moore in the contest. Panelists: Tamar Hallerman — Senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Dr. Andra Gillespie — Professor of political science and director, James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference, Emory University Rene Alegria — CEO, Mundo Hispanico Digital Thomas Wheatley — Axios Atlanta

Political Rewind: Closing arguments in Brunswick as eyes turn to jury; Lucy McBath eyes 7th District

Political Rewind November 22, 2021

Monday on Political Rewind: Self-defense was a key argument in the pursuit of acquittal in Kenosha, Wisc., in the trial of Kyle Rittenhouse. Meanwhile in Georgia, defense lawyers in the trial of Gregory and Travis McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan" also claimed self-defense as closing arguments unfolded on Monday. Both trials have highlighted deep racial and partisan fault lines. Morehouse political science professor Dr. Adrienne Jones said race provides a crucial context for understanding the trials. "We are living in two different worlds, right?" Jones said. "The Black community in the United States is experiencing the police and the vigilante system differently than the majority of people here in the United States. It's historical, in the South in particular." The trials also sparked conversation on gun laws in the United States. Adding to the conversation, an accidentally discharged gun led to panic at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport this weekend. Officials from the Transportation Security Administration said more guns have been confiscated at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport than at any other airport in the country so far this year. In other news, the government agency charged with monitoring workplace safety said it is suspending enforcement of the federal vaccine mandate for large businesses. An appeals court had stayed the mandate. What are the consequences for federal enforcement of COVID-related public health policy. Panelists: Riley Bunch — Public policy reporter, GPB News Emma Hurt — Reporter, Axios Atlanta Dr. Adrienne Jones — Professor of political science and director of pre-law, Morehouse College Dr. Tammy Greer — Professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University

Political Rewind: The future of Georgia politics take shape as lawmakers reveal redistricting maps

Friday on Political Rewind: Consequential updates to Georgia's political maps are moving through a special session of the state General Assembly. The Republican-controlled legislature is redrawing the boundaries of state and congressional legislatorial seats as part of a decennial process mandated by law. Among the changes, Republican lawmakers look likely to deny U.S. Rep. Lucy McBath reelection in the 6th District. Patricia Murphy, politics columnist for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, said proposed changes to the 6th District would create a marked shift in its political makeup. Parts of Gwinnett County would be ceded and replaced by Republican-leaning communities in neighboring Forsyth, Cherokee and Dawson counties. "It's going from an area that voted for Joe Biden by 12 points, to one that voted for Donald Trump by 15 points," Murphy said. "So just a huge partisan swing." Meanwhile, the effort to create an independent city of Buckhead takes another step forward as state Sen. Brandon Beach filed legislation that, if passed, would give Buckhead residents the right to decide the issue in next November's election. Panelists: Patricia Murphy — Politics reporter and columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Stephen Fowler — Politics reporter, GPB News Rep. Teri Anulewicz — State representative, (D-Smyrna) Eric Tanenblatt — Republican insider

Political Rewind: The future of Georgia politics take shape as lawmakers reveal redistricting maps

Political Rewind: William Cope Moyers on his recovery from a illness that takes no prisoners

Thursday on Political Rewind: A story of addiction and recovery. William Cope Moyers is the son of journalist and presidential advisor Bill Moyers, and has memories from childhood of Air Force One and the White House. In the early '90s, Moyers followed his father's path into a promising career at CNN in Atlanta. However, his life began to spiral out of control thanks to a substance addiction to alcohol, crack cocaine and more. In recounting his struggles, Moyer says he hit rock bottom in downtown Atlanta 25 years ago. But Moyers has sought to help others struggling with addiction by telling the story of his road to recovery over the decades. His candid discussion of substance abuse disorder spurred frank dialogue on the stigmatized topic of addiction. Addiction and recovery has been changed by the pandemic. Changes to day-to-day life since the onset of COVID-19 are exacerbating America's addiction problems, Moyer's said. "As we know, too often, people die when they can't get help," Moyers said. "And in the midst of this pandemic, people have been isolated. People have been under stress." New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released this week show a surge in deaths from overdoses in the past year — 100,000 Americans. In Georgia, more than 1,900 people died of drug-related causes in 2020, according to CDC data released in August. That is a 38.8% increase over data from the previous year. Panelist: William Cope Moyers – Vice President of Public Affairs and Community Relations with Hazelden Betty Ford If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, the following resources are available to help. 24/7 treatment referral and information can be found through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration at 1-800-662-4357 or SAMHSA.gov. Resources in Georgia are available through The Georgia Council on Substance Abuse.

Political Rewind: William Cope Moyers on his recovery from a illness that takes no prisoners

Political Rewind: Ga. redistricting steps forward; culture wars could be central in 2022

Wednesday on Political Rewind: The legislature is expected to move forward with redistricting maps likely to consolidate Republican control of Georgia's U.S. congressional delegation for years to come. Our panel discussed the possible consequences. Will Democratic U.S. Representative Lucy McBath find herself in a risky position as the boundaries of her 6th District are redrawn? Also, a controversial proposal to increase the size of the Gwinnett County Commission is off the table for now. However, the proposal's author, Republican state Sen. Clint Dixon, says it will be back when the regular session begins in January. Democrats claim Dixon wants to undermine the power of the currently all-Democratic commission by adding members. Plus, controversial "culture war" issues are set to take a prominent role in messaging surrounding the 2022 elections. Clark Atlanta professor Dr. Kurt Young said the use of these issues, such as the banning of books by celebrated authors like Toni Morrison, show how culture is used a political tool. "Culture is more than simply artistic expression: It's really a reflection of the very basic values that govern a society or within a society," Young said. "What we're seeing in Virginia, what we're seeing here in Georgia, is a reflection of these very deep-seated efforts to exercise power using cultural instruments." Panelists: Greg Bluestein — Politics reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Maya Prabhu — Politics reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Chuck Williams — Reporter, WRBL-TV, Columbus Dr. Kurt Young — Chair and professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University

Political Rewind: Ga. redistricting steps forward; culture wars could be central in 2022

Political Rewind November 16, 2021

Tuesday on Political Rewind, defense lawyer Kevin Gough called for another Black pastor, Rev. Jesse Jackson, to be removed from the Brunswick, Ga., courtroom in the trial of the three white men charged with murder in the death of Ahmaud Arbery, a young Black man. The judge described comments made by Gough's last week as "reprehensible." Gough had urged Judge Timothy Walmsley to bar members of the clergy invited by the Arbery family from the courtroom. Also, Newt Gingrich added to Gov. Brian Kemp's reelection woes by insisting that Kemp can't beat Stacey Abrams but former Sen. David Perdue can. Meanwhile, Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis edged closer to empaneling a special grand jury to look at possible criminal behavior in former President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn Georgia's 2020 election outcome. Panelists: Tamar Hallerman — Senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Leo Smith — Republican consultant, President of Engaged Futures Sen. Kim Jackson — State senator (D-Stone Mountain) Dr. Alan Abramowitz — Professor emeritus of political science, Emory University

Political Rewind: Attorney comments are another sign race is central in trial of McMichaels, Bryan

Monday on Political Rewind: Race continues to be a central theme in the case of Travis McMichael, Gregory McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan — the three white men charged with murder in the shooting of Black jogger Ahmaud Arbery in 2020. A defense attorney in the case received criticism after complaining about the presence of Black pastors, including well-known names like Rev. Al Sharpton, in the courtroom. Emory professor of constitutional law Fred Smith said the attorney's comments are notable because they provide additional framing of the high-profile case within America's ongoing reckoning with racism. "Part of what we're seeing in this particular trial is that the subtext of race — which is often present in the American criminal legal system — the subtext is just the text," Emory professor Fred Smith said. "There's also, built into that, a broader context in the criminal legal system, where many scholars like Paul Butler and others have written, about how when police see African Americans, they are viewed more as a threat and how that's kind of a thread throughout criminal legal system." Meanwhile, President Joe Biden is scheduled to sign the long-awaited infrastructure bill Monday. Every Republican member of Georgia congressional delegation voted against the measure. Some congressional Republicans who did vote for the bill, including South Carolina's Lindsay Graham, are being targeted with death threats and calls for expulsion. In other news, a federal appeals court signals its displeasure with the Biden Administration vaccine mandate. Panelists: Dr. Andra Gillespie — Political science professor and director, James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference, Emory University Margaret Coker — Editor-in-chief, The Current Fred Smith — Professor of constitutional law, Emory University Dr. Heather Farley — Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice, Public Policy and Management, Georgia Coastal College

Political Rewind: Attorney comments are another sign race is central in trial of McMichaels, Bryan

Political Rewind: Attorney's comments draw criticism in Brunswick trial; Will Abrams run?

Friday on Political Rewind: In a trial already infused with questions about racism, a defense lawyer added fuel to the fire yesterday with comments about the presence of Black religious leaders in the courtroom. Meanwhile, Sen. Raphael Warnock says Democrats have to do a better job telling voters how their big-ticket legislative agenda will improve daily lives. Plus: a look at candidates already on the Georgia ballot in 2022. Will Stacey Abrams decide against running for governor? Will former Sen. David Perdue challenge Gov. Brian Kemp? Panelists: Patricia Murphy — Political reporter and columnist, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Dr. Tammy Greer — Political science professor, Clark Atlanta University Dr. Audrey Haynes — Political science professor, University of Georgia Dr. Amy Steigerwalt — Political science professor, Georgia State University

Political Rewind: Attorney's comments draw criticism in Brunswick trial; Will Abrams run?

Political Rewind: Speculation grows about 2022's potential gubernatorial candidates

Thursday on Political Rewind: Gov. Brian Kemp goes on the offensive with the threat of a challenge from David Perdue looming in the air. His allies rallied in recent days to push Kemp as their candidate for re-election to the governor's mansion. But, did Perdue give a signal to a group of Brunswick Republicans he is not interested in making the race? Also, help could be on the way to relieve the traffic jam as container ships wait for days to unload cargo at the Port of Savannah. Plus, Georgia GOP legislators make quick work of voting on new state house districts. Democrats make small gains but say they should get more. Panelists: Adam Van Brimmer — Editorial page editor, Savannah Morning News Riley Bunch — Public policy reporter, GPB News Tia Mitchell — Washington reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Kevin Riley — Editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: Speculation grows about 2022's potential gubernatorial candidates

Political Rewind: For local leaders, city governance is a laboratory of democracy

Wednesday on Political Rewind: We spoke with a panel of mayors from across Georgia to learn more about each of their communities. Mayor Hardie Davis Jr. of Augusta said cities are the frontlines of democratic governance, so it is important to have accountable leaders. "The majority of our nation's GDP happens in and around cities," he said. "And so when you look at the things that are taking place, the Sandy Springs[es], the Tiftons, the Augustas, we quite frankly are the laboratories of democracy. What we are interested in is doing the most good for the most people and representing all of our cities and our residents." What are the key issues they are confronting as 2021 reaches its final weeks? And as federal COVID relief money begins to become available to municipal governments, what are their expectations for how that money will be used? And with Congress' passage of a long-debated infrastructure bill, what do local leaders need for roads, bridges and other projects? Plus, we asked whether the angry partisan divide gripping this country is having an impact on their residents. Panelists: Mayor Julie Smith — Mayor of Tifton Mayor Hardie Davis — Mayor of Augusta Mayor Rusty Paul — Mayor of Sandy Springs Greg Bluestein — Politics reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: For local leaders, city governance is a laboratory of democracy

Political Rewind: Remembering Max Cleland; communities concerned redistricting will split them apart

Tuesday on Political Rewind: We remembered the life and political career of Georgian and former Sen. Max Cleland. Cleland served in the army during the Vietnam War, before entering into the state General Assembly and then serving as the head of the Veterans Administration under President Jimmy Carter. Cleland would go on to serve as Georgia's secretary of state and then as a U.S. senator for two terms until 2003. The 79-year-old died last night from heart failure, according to reports. As a reporter, host Bill Nigut covered Cleland closely and said the representative had a remarkable zest for life. "He wore a Mickey Mouse watch everywhere he went and he told people that he wore it because he wanted to remind everyone that he shouldn't take life too seriously," Nigut said. "So he was a remarkable public servant." In redistricting news, Republican legislative leaders are facing pushback from some GOP voters who say they're being denied the right to elect candidates of their own choice as proposed redistricting maps surface. Some conservative voters south of Atlanta worry that a proposed change could endanger Republican state Rep. Phillip Singleton. His current Coweta district is poised to extend into South Fulton, a Democratic stronghold, in the new maps. University of Georgia political science professor Dr. Charles Bullock has extensively studied redistricting, and authored a book on the process. He believes that Republicans drawing the new lines are playing a long game. "I think what's driving the Republicans here is when you draw this map, you're not just drawing for 2022 or 2024," Bullock said. "You really are drawing a map you hope is going to work for your party for 10 years. And so you're anticipating what kind of changes may take place. That's hard to do." Meanwhile, new reporting from The New York Times shows Fulton County district attorney Fani Willis is preparing to pursue a special grand jury to determine if former President Donald Trump should face criminal charges for working to convince Georgia GOP officials to overturn the results of the presidential race. Panelists: Tamar Hallerman — Senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Mariela Romero — Community empowerment director, Univision Dr. Jennifer McCoy — Political science professor, Georgia State University Dr. Charles Bullock — Political science professor, University of Georgia

Political Rewind: Remembering Max Cleland; communities concerned redistricting will split them apart

Political Rewind: Kemp pushes back on vaccine mandate; Georgia GOP and Dems clash over redistricting

​Monday on Political Rewind: Gov. Brian Kemp and Attorney General Chris Carr have expanded their legal battle against the Biden administration's COVID-19 vaccine mandate. They filed a new lawsuit even as Georgia passed 25,000 deaths from COVID-19. Axios political reporter Emma Hurt pointed out that Kemp's resistance to the vaccine mandate falls in line with his strategy throughout the pandemic, and his opposition to Biden. "He says, 'This is your choice,'" she said. "'You and your doctor should decide. I think it's a good idea, but I'm not going to tell you what to do. I'm the government. You decide for yourself.' So it really fits in with that track record. And it also positions Kemp well. As you know, I think we've seen him do this repeatedly, going back to the good politics point, as kind of a foil on the national stage to Biden. We saw it with the voting law. And so it is it does make political sense as well beyond know the legal arguments that they are making." A federal appeals court has temporarily stayed the order calling for companies with more than 100 employees to require vaccines for their workers by early next year. Meanwhile, the state senate is moving quickly to pass new Georgia voting districts. The redistricting committee approved new senate districts on just the third day of the special session. Democrats say GOP legislators aren't giving them or the public the time needed to weigh in on the new maps. Also: If Stacey Abrams chooses not to run for governor, is DeKalb Democratic CEO Michael Thurmond likely to enter the race? He hinted he might on our show late last week. Panelists: Emma Hurt — Political reporter, Axios Atlanta Stephen Fowler — Political reporter, GPB news Leroy Chapman — Managing editor, Atlanta Journal-Constitution Jim Galloway — Former political columnist, Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: Kemp pushes back on vaccine mandate; Georgia GOP and Dems clash over redistricting

Political Rewind: Upset in Atlanta mayoral race; Fallout from Va. elections; Thurmond for governor?

Friday on Political Rewind: Kasim Reed conceded in the race for mayor of Atlanta. The Nov. 30 runoff will see City Council President Felicia Moore face councilman Andre Dickens. Meanwhile, Gov. Brian Kemp and other Republicans on the 2022 ballot have moved quickly to trumpet the anti-Biden messaging that led to an upset GOP victory in the Virginia governor's race. DeKalb County CEO Michael Thurmond made it clear he will not rule out the possibility that he may run for governor next year. Thurmond was asked if he would consider running if Stacey Abrams announces she will not challenge Brian Kemp in that race. "I'm always interested," he said. "Hope springs eternal in every political heart. We'll see what the future brings." Panelists: Patricia Murphy — Politics reporter and columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Maria Saporta — Editor, Saporta Report Michael Thurmond — CEO, DeKalb County Leo Smith — Republican consultant and president, Engaged Futures

Political Rewind: Upset in Atlanta mayoral race; Fallout from Va. elections; Thurmond for governor?

Political Rewind: Jury selection in Arbery trial protested by prosecutors, public

Thursday on Political Rewind: The jury selection tasked with deciding the fate of Travis and Gregory McMichael and William "Roddie" Bryan was announced Wednesday. The three men stand trial for murder in the shooting of 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery in February 2020. Prosecutors protested the jury selection, arguing its makeup does not match the demographics of Glynn County. Eleven white jurors and one Black juror were chosen to hear the case. Meanwhile in the state Capitol, legislators settled into the main business of their special session: redrawing the political maps of Georgia. Will Republicans expand their control or cede ground to Democrats as they reshape the electoral landscape? Panelists: Rep. Mary Margaret Oliver — State representative (D-Decatur) Edward Lindsey — Former Georgia state representative Fred Smith — Professor of constitutional law, Emory University Kevin Riley — Editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: Jury selection in Arbery trial protested by prosecutors, public

Political Rewind: A look back at Election Day as the dust settles and the votes are counted

Wednesday on Political Rewind: The race for mayor of Atlanta is headed for a runoff. City Council President Felicia Moore secured her spot handily. The second place spot, and a ticket to the runoffs, was undecided as the sun rose on Wednesday morning. Incumbent mayors in a number of Georgia cities fought off challenges from progressive candidates. What do the results tell us about the mood of voters right now? Democrats across the country felt a chill looking toward to 2022 today as the state of Virginia elected a Republican governor. What does the GOP upset victory tell us about next year's races in Georgia? Plus, we previewed the redistricting session, which is underway at the state Capitol. Panelists: Dr. Andra Gillespie — Professor of political science and director at James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference, Emory University Dr. Karen Owen — Professor of political science, University of West Georgia Donna Lowry — Host, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Lawmakers Greg Bluestein — Politics reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: A look back at Election Day as the dust settles and the votes are counted

Political Rewind: Local races headline on Election Day. Where do voters stand?

Tuesday on Political Rewind: It is Election Day in Georgia, with important municipal races in communities across the state. Among the races, Savannah is picking a new state House representative, Marietta is voting on seats for its Board of Education and Atlanta residents are deciding on a new mayor. This year, some have taken on a more partisan edge than in past elections. "If we take those partisan items and bring them down to the municipal level, what you tend to do is to discourage people from participating on the municipal level, which then cornered the market for a political ideology to takeover municipal offices," Clark Atlanta University political science professor Tammy Greer said. Meanwhile, voters in Virginia will elect a new governor today. Our panel looked at the issues propelling voters to the polls there and giving candidates in Georgia ammunition for their own 2022 campaigns. Also, the U.S. Supreme Court appears poised to allow opponents of the new Texas abortion law to proceed with cases challenging the legality of the statute. Why could that be good news for gun advocates here? Panelists: Tamar Hallerman – Senior reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Rene Alegria – CEO, Mundo Hispanico Digital Dr. Tammy Greer – Professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Chuck Kuck – Immigration attorney

Political Rewind: Local races headline on Election Day. Where do voters stand?

Political Rewind: A look at key elections across Ga.; Lawmakers to draw state's new political maps

Monday on Political Rewind: Candidates in municipal elections across Georgia are getting one last day of campaigning in before voters head to the polls on Election Day tomorrow. We previewed key races. Tomorrow's races are set to play out under new state laws governing election law passed following the 2020 election. The new rules could set the stage for state takeovers of local election boards that fail to to comply with the provisions. Lies about the election, promoted by former President Donald Trump and his supporters in the Republican Party, provoked the changes. Also, legislators across the state head to Atlanta to take part in a consequential special session of the General Assembly tasked with drawing Georgia's new political maps. The decennial process of altering Georgia's district boundaries begins on Wednesday. In other news, an investigation by the Current reveals evidence of racial bias in the Glynn County Police Department. Panelists: Riley Bunch — Public policy reporter, GPB News Margaret Coker — Editor-in-chief, The Current Maya Prabhu — Statehouse reporter, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Jim Galloway — Former political columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: A look at key elections across Ga.; Lawmakers to draw state's new political maps

Political Rewind: Once a rising star in GOP, Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan says party needs new path forward

Friday on Political Rewind: Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan is viewed as an outsider by many in his own party. The Republican from Alpharetta, Ga., has been at odds with Republican leaders over the rhetoric of former President Donald Trump. Duncan publicly spoke out against the conspiracy theories and lies spread by Trump and his allies in the Republican party following defeats in the 2020 elections. In his new book, GOP 2.0: How the 2020 Election Can Lead to a Better Way Forward for America's Conservative Party, Duncan recalls the journey he took to becoming a pariah within the GOP and urges for a new direction forward for the Republican Party. He argues the Republican party needs to blend conservative policy with empathy and a respectful tone in order to stay relevant in future elections. The harsh, acidic rhetoric of the Trump presidency needs to be left behind. "I don't disagree with a majority of the policies that Donald Trump stood for," Duncan said. "He just literally forgot to remind 350 million Americans about those policies. He just wanted to pick on people for the last six months of this campaign cycle." In addition to the book, Duncan also launched a website for his movement, which he promises will bring "a fresh and reasoned approach to creating Republican majorities." He says his goal is to build enough support among voters and party officials to gain influence in the 2024 election cycle. "We've got to convince tens of millions of folks that this is the direction, this is the path forward, for the party," he said. "And you know, we're going to take the next three years to do that." With appearances across the nation on his book tour and on cable news, some analysts say Duncan might be attempting to build a national brand that could help him to a presidential bid for office. On whether he would like to see his name considered for a future Republican presidential primary, Duncan said he be honored to be considered. "But that is so far from anything that me or my wife would be thinking about at this point," he said. Panelists: Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan – 12th Lt. Gov. of Georgia, Former state Representative from the 26th District Patricia Murphy – Columnist, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Political Rewind: Once a rising star in GOP, Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan says party needs new path forward