River to River River to River is Iowa Public Radio's talk program that focuses on the news, issues and events in our state. This national award-winning program goes beyond the headlines, frames community problems, and fosters conversation.
River to River

River to River

From Iowa Public Radio

River to River is Iowa Public Radio's talk program that focuses on the news, issues and events in our state. This national award-winning program goes beyond the headlines, frames community problems, and fosters conversation.More from River to River »

Most Recent Episodes

New Climate Report Forecasts Rising Temperatures, More Precipitation for Iowa

This weekend, U.N. climate negotiations that were held in Bonn, Germany ended. The two-week talks were aimed at laying the groundwork for faster action to curb climate change and deal with its impacts. The first public draft of the 4th National Climate Assessment was also released earlier this month. During this River to River segment, host Ben Kieffer is joined by Iowa State University professor of agronomy and climate scientist Gene Takle, and Charles Stainer, who is an associate professor of

New Climate Report Forecasts Rising Temperatures, More Precipitation for Iowa

Meet Mazahir Salih, the First Sudanese Woman Elected to Public Office in Iowa

Mazahir Salih, an immigrant from Sudan and resident of Iowa City is thought to be the first Sudanese-American elected to government in the United States. Earlier this month, she was elected to the Iowa City city council. She's a full-time community organizer and founder of the Center for Worker Justice in Iowa City, and during this River to River interview, she talks with host Ben Kieffer. During her campaign, she focused on issues of affordable housing, expanding public transportation, and

Meet Mazahir Salih, the First Sudanese Woman Elected to Public Office in Iowa

News Buzz: Frankie the Pig Helps Children Read and Relax

On this news buzz edition of River to River , Ben Kieffer hosts conversations on various Iowa news of the week: Iowa Public Radio statehouse correspondent Joyce Russell talks about her reporting on the Iowa Legislature sexual harassment investigation ; UI Public Policy Center director Pete Damiano clarifies several local and national healthcare issues; Vote Hemp president Eric Steenstra discusses the push for change in Iowa hemp law; Iowa State University professor emeritus Carl Smith talks

Russian Revolution at 100

It was one of the defining moments of the 20th century with repercussions up to the present day. On this River to River program, we remember the Russian Revolution one hundred years ago. Drake University historian and native Russian Natalie Bayer and University of Iowa political scientist Bill Reisinger join the conversation. They talk through the fall of the Tsarist autocracy and the rise and fall of the Soviet Union. It's a story that threads through to the present day in Putin's Russia. Bayer

Political Analysts on GOP Tax Overhaul

President Trump returns from Asia to political turmoil. On this edition of River to River , political analysts Steffen Schmidt of Iowa State University and Scott Peters of the University of Iowa discuss: Republican efforts to stay focused on a tax overhaul; the House and Senate visions for tax reform and the latest effort as part of it to repeal the health insurance mandate; Jeff Sessions' testimony on Russia meetings; and the Justice Department weighing a Clinton investigation. Also, as the

"Farmers of the Sea" Say Livelihood Dying from Midwest Ag Pollution

Thomas Olander of Louisiana has been a shrimper and fisherman for about 40 years. He says his livelihood and way of life is dying out because of the growing dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico. "The guys that drag across that area, they absolutely cannot catch anything alive," he says. "Nothing lives in it." According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, dead zones are caused by "excessive nutrient pollution from human activities coupled with other factors that deplete the oxygen

More Connected, but Further Apart: Growing Divides in the Age of Technology

New technology has dramatically changed how we communicate and interact, and Michael Bugeja says that in doing so, it may slowly be eroding some of our core principles. Professor Bugeja of Iowa State University's Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication joins host Ben Kieffer during this hour of River to River . Bugeja talks about ideas presented in his latest book: Interpersonal Divide in the Age of the Machine . In it, he explores what might happen if we allow machines to dictate our

More Connected, but Further Apart: Growing Divides in the Age of Technology

Mayor Since the Early '70s, Kramer is Reelected Again

In this news buzz edition of River to River , Ben Kieffer talks with one of the longest serving mayors in the country, Milt Kramer. He was just reelected and has been elected 14 times since the early 1970s. Also on this program, we hear about the theft of pension funds from Iowa's public employees retirement fund; the 2018 Iowa Teacher of the Year Aileen Sullivan; a State Historical Society project gathering WWI photos; and the 50th anniversary of the Public Broadcasting Act.

Debriefing on Municipal Elections, Talking Controversy Regarding the DNC

During this hour of River to River , host Ben Kieffer talks with University of Northern Iowa political science professor Chris Larimer about the results of Iowa's municipal elections that took place on Tuesday this week. Several larger cities in the state either have new mayors or will host run off elections. "In the city of Ames, Ann Campbell stepped aside, she'd been the mayor for a long time," says Larimer. "John Haila is the new mayor. It will be interesting to see what happens there.

Debriefing on Municipal Elections, Talking Controversy Regarding the DNC

A Shift in Who Advises the EPA Has Some Environmental Scientists Concerned

Scientists serving as advisers to the Environmental Protection Agency are finding out from news stories that they've been removed or demoted. Many of these scientists come from academia, and they say they're being replaced by scientists from industries regulated by the EPA Professor Peter Thorne heads the University of Iowa's Department of Occupational and Environmental Health. Until recently, he also chaired the EPA's Science Advisory Board, the agency's most prominent advising body. "I was

A Shift in Who Advises the EPA Has Some Environmental Scientists Concerned

Back To Top