Engines of Our Ingenuity The story of technological progress is one of drama and intrigue, sudden insight and plain hard work. Let's explore technology's spectacular failures and many magnificent success stories.
Engines of Our Ingenuity

Engines of Our Ingenuity

From Houston Public Media News 88.7

The story of technological progress is one of drama and intrigue, sudden insight and plain hard work. Let's explore technology's spectacular failures and many magnificent success stories.More from Engines of Our Ingenuity »

Most Recent Episodes

Engines of Our Ingenuity 1542: Francis Bacon

Episode: 1542 In which Francis Bacon pushes a strict Aristotelian Agenda. Today, science tries to find its way.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 2784: Green Golf Courses

Episode: 2784 Environmentally Sustainable Golf Courses. Today, where the grass is always greener.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 1541: History and Horseshoe Nails

Episode: 1541 Do 'Horseshoe Nails' really alter human history? Today, we ask if horseshoe nails are real.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 2783: Humans, Computers, and Puzzles

Episode: 2783 Humans, Computers and Puzzles. Today, we puzzle.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 1540: The Ironclad Turtle

Episode: 1540 The Korean Turtle Boat - the first ironclad. Today, we meet a turtle with an iron shell.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 1539: Boundary Layers

Episode: 1539 In which a thin layer of fluid determines whether an airplane flies. Today, a wind blows by us.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 2778: Qualia

Episode: 2778 Qualia and Mary's Black and White Room. Today, there's something about Mary.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 1537: Life On the Moon

Episode: 1537 John Wilkins talks about life on the Moon, in 1638. Today, life on the moon.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 2774: Hospitality Industry Archives

Episode: 2774 The Massad Family Research Center and Hospitality Industry Archives. Today, travel made easier.

Engines of Our Ingenuity 1536: Old Airports

Episode: 1536 A seventy-year old picture of transcontinental flight. Today, let's fly across American in 1930.

Back To Top