Five Things How do the objects we love define us? What can we learn from the things we treasure? And how can we discover a life story through those objects? Five Things, from 89.3 WFPL and Louisville Public Media, explores those questions and more.
Five Things

Five Things

From 89.3 WFPL News Louisville

How do the objects we love define us? What can we learn from the things we treasure? And how can we discover a life story through those objects? Five Things, from 89.3 WFPL and Louisville Public Media, explores those questions and more.More from Five Things »

Most Recent Episodes

Don't try to shop for "Bullseye" host Jesse Thorn

Jesse Thorn, of NPR's "Bullseye" as well as "Jordan, Jesse, Go!" and "Judge John Hodgman," tells us about the highly idiosyncratic objects that sum up his highly idiosyncratic life. I recently learned that he is a devotee of "Antiques Roadshow," and I knew I needed to get him on Five Things. **Programming note: this is the last episode of the season! We're taking a break for the summer and will be back in the fall. In the meantime, might I suggest you peruse our archives? I bet your new favorite episode is just sitting there, unlistened. :)

Angela Davis Knits Her Life Together

This week's guest is Angela Davis, a schoolteacher whose primary teaching tool is knitting needles. And this conversation between us arose from her first item — I saw her at the theatre, wearing a gorgeous coat, and I had to ask her about it.

School librarian Lindsy Serrano isn't judging you

This week, we'll hear from a woman whose job is to get kids psyched up about reading. And through that job, she met her hero.

Writer Leesa Cross-Smith is Quietly Radical

Writer Leesa Cross-Smith is based in Louisville, and she's just published her first novel, "Whiskey and Ribbons." Find out why she considered it a radical act to tell the story in the way she did, what's her secret weapon when it comes to getting writing done, and the tweet so good... she put it on a coffee mug. http://www.leesacrosssmith.com/ https://www.oxfordamerican.org/magazine/item/1353-ain-t-half-bad

Musician Joe Henry makes coffee for everybody

My guest this week is one of my very favorite musicians, Joe Henry. His brother Dave was one of my first guests on this show, and I was thrilled when Joe agreed to take part as well. He's just released his fourteenth studio album, called "Thrum," and he's also produced records for a lot of amazing musicians, including Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt, Ani DiFranco, and Allen Toussaint. He's co-written songs with Roseanne Cash and with Madonna — who happens to be his sister-in-law.

Manoush Zomorodi of "Note to Self" tells you why she still wears a watch.

The host of "Note to Self," a podcast about the human side of technology, tells us about the simple, small things that keep her grounded (and on time).

Manoush Zomorodi of "Note to Self" tells you why she still wears a watch.

Mark Schultz, Playwright and Priest, on the Music of Theatre

Mark Schultz is the author of "Evocation to Visible Appearance," among other plays, and he's also a priest in the Episcopal Church. He was in Louisville for the premiere of his play at the Humana Festival at Actors' Theatre, and we talked about his fondness for black metal, Kurt Weill, and his husband.

Pomegranates and Ginger with Chef Anoosh Shariat

This episode's guest is Chef Anoosh Shariat, owner of two Louisville restaurants, Anoosh Bistro and Noosh Nosh. He grew up in Iran, learned classical "fine dining" techniques, and was a local pioneer in fusion cooking.

Cigar Boxes and a Jar of Marbles with Claude Stephens (Episode 58)

My guest this week on Five Things is Claude Stephens, who works as an educator at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, just south of Louisville. But as he says, there are many other ways he moves through the world.

Benny Goodman, A Painted Pith Helmet, and the Theatrics of Religion with Vin Scelsa (Episode 57)

Vin Scelsa is a familiar name to anybody who grew up listening to FM radio in the New York/New Jersey area. He spent nearly 50 years playing music on the radio, starting out at a college station, then a couple of commercial stations, before heading to public radio.He was on the air the night that John Lennon died in 1980, and he turned WNEW's airwaves into a kind of virtual wake, with callers sharing their grief. Along the way, he interviewed everybody from David Bowie to Suzanne Vega to Kurt Vonnegut. I met Vin when we were both working at WFUV in the Bronx, Fordham University's public radio station, and he did a weekly show called "Idiot's Delight." He's retired now, and I visited him last summer at his home in suburban New Jersey, where he and his wife Freddie had bagels and coffee waiting for me. After we ate and caught up, we went into his home studio to talk.

Benny Goodman, A Painted Pith Helmet, and the Theatrics of Religion with Vin Scelsa (Episode 57)

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