Created Equal Hosted by Stephen Henderson, Created Equal is about the promise of opportunity and the challenge of inequality from the city that built America — Detroit.
Created Equal

Created Equal

From WDET 101.9 FM

Hosted by Stephen Henderson, Created Equal is about the promise of opportunity and the challenge of inequality from the city that built America — Detroit.

Most Recent Episodes

Implications of the new 'MENA' category on the US Census

Until now, Americans whose heritage is in the Middle East and North Africa have long been considered "white" by the U.S. Census. But beginning in 2030, they will have their own ethnic category. Maya Berry, executive director of the Arab American Institute, joins "Created Equal" to discuss the change and what it means to Americans in those communities.

Is the new 'Hispanic or Latino' census category good enough?

A new Hispanic or Latino category with six additional options to specify ethnicity was approved for the next census form by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. Maria Hinojosa, host of Latino USA, joins "Created Equal" to discuss the new category, immigration and what it all could mean.

Weekly recap: Segregation in country music; the importance of free play for kids and more

Today on "Created Equal," we share highlights from this week's episodes, including what Beyoncé's "Cowboy Carter" tell us about the segregation of country music in America; a federal lawsuit claiming government buildings in Michigan violate disability rights; the importance of free play for kids and more.

Weekly recap: Segregation in country music; the importance of free play for kids and more

Kids need free play more than ever

Active kids live better lives, so why is youth sports participation so low? Tom Farrey of the Aspen Institute's Sports & Society Program and Dave Egner, President and CEO of the Ralph C. Wilson Jr. Foundation join to talk about the path forward for increasing free play.

Lawsuit claims local government buildings violate disability rights

A federal class action lawsuit against the city of Detroit, Wayne County, the state of Michigan and the Detroit-Wayne Joint Building Authority is alleging that several government buildings lack accessibility for those with disabilities. Today on the show, we speak with Michael Bartnik, an attorney representing the plaintiffs in the case, and Outlier Media reporter Laura Herberg, who recently profiled one of the plaintiffs.

What Beyoncé and Cowboy Carter tell us about the segregation of country music in America

When Beyoncé released "Cowboy Carter" last month, the 22-song country album surprised and delighted music fans across genres, including pop, hip-hop and country. But what was so shocking about Beyoncé doing a country album in the first place? And what can we learn from the collective surprise and at times, indignation, that she would produce a country album? Music historian and journalist Dan Charnas joins the show to discuss.

What Beyoncé and Cowboy Carter tell us about the segregation of country music in America

Can tech regulation solve mental health issues?

Congress members in February collected enough signatures in the U.S. Senate to pass a bipartisan bill that would regulate social media use for kids, arguing the platforms could be bad for teen's mental health. Danah Boyd, a Microsoft researcher and visiting professor at Georgetown, believes technology is not the real problem and that regulating social media could do more harm than good. Boyd joins "Created Equal" to explore how society has responded throughout history to new technologies and discuss why she believes the real problem isn't our phone screens.

Weekly recap: Maternity care deserts; the complexity of migrant smuggling and more

Today on "Created Equal," we share highlights from this week's episodes, including a look into maternity care deserts and the loss of health care access for women; a new book from anthropologist Jason De León exploring the complicated practice of migrant smuggling; Detroit's credit bump and more.

Weekly recap: Maternity care deserts; the complexity of migrant smuggling and more

Does Detroit's credit bump tell the full story?

Detroit's credit rating is moving up — nearly 10 years after the bankruptcy — which means government operations are normalizing and avoiding irresponsible debt. However, many Detroit residents still struggle with limited opportunity and carry collective debts that put real strain on the city's financial foundation. On today's show, we're joined by local developer Chase Cantrell and U-M researcher Amanda Nothaft to discuss what the rating increase means for both the city and its residents.

New state House districts are finalized after bumpy, but successful process

Just two years into Michigan's experiment with citizen-drawn maps for the Legislature and Congress, a court-ordered redraw to address gerrymandering is finally finished for the state House, and voters will see the difference at the polls this spring and fall. Ben Solis, a reporter at Gongwer News Service, and Colin Jackson, state capitol reporter for Michigan Public Radio Network, joined the show to discuss the process and its potential outcomes.

New state House districts are finalized after bumpy, but successful process