Suspect Convictions Investigating true crime in the Heartland. Season 1 (produced with WVIK) focused on the 1990 murder of 9-year-old Jennifer Lewis in the Quad Cities. Season 2 (produced with WGLT) explored the 1998 murder of a Bloomington girl and a similar case 13 years later.
Suspect Convictions

Suspect Convictions

From WGLT

Investigating true crime in the Heartland. Season 1 (produced with WVIK) focused on the 1990 murder of 9-year-old Jennifer Lewis in the Quad Cities. Season 2 (produced with WGLT) explored the 1998 murder of a Bloomington girl and a similar case 13 years later.More from Suspect Convictions »

Most Recent Episodes

24: The Scurvy Defense

Scurvy once the plague of pirates and seafaring explorers provided a unique defense for Charles Robbins after 29 years on Nevada's death row. And remarkably, the defense worked. SPONSORS: https://www.hungryroot.com/ Use promo code "Suspect" at checkout for $25 off your first two orders!

23: The Big Sleazy

Reginald Adams was framed for murdering a New Orleans police officer's wife and served 34 years in prison for a crime he did not commit. SPONSORS: https://www.hungryroot.com Use promo code "Suspect" at checkout for $25 off your first two orders! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/yours-in-murder/id1252518334?mt=2

22: Cops, Lies and Videotape

Imagine a defense attorney who refuses to sit with his client, a corrupt police department and a mysteriously edited videotape of an interrogation and you can begin to understand what Darrell Jones faced when he went on trial for a murder he may not have committed.

Introducing The Wonderland Murders

The Wonderland Murders takes you on journey back to the drug- and sex-fueled world of 1970s L.A. all building to brutal multiple murder just off the Sunset Strip. You can hear the first two episodes right now by searching for The Wonderland Murders on Apple Podcasts, wherever you're listening to this, or visit wondery.fm/suspect

21: A Sketchy Investigation

Tyrone Hicks was once thought to be the "Bronx Rapist." The woman who was attacked misidentified Tyrone as her assailant. DNA eventually cleared him of the crime – after he had finished serving his prison sentence. Journalist Scott Reeder explores how faulty identifications happen and what impact they have on individual lives.

20: That Bites

Did a faulty forensic technique called "bite mark analysis" send two innocent men to Mississippi's death row? Scott Reeder examines the issue. Sponsors: www.ThisSoundsSerious.com

19: The Wrong Collar

Rachel's Casey's duplex erupted into flames in July 2001. and her 7-month-old baby died. An arson investigator used a dog to search the fire scene and the dog "alerted" to the possibility that a flammable liquid was used. But a subsequent laboratory test found the canine was wrong. Despite this, Rachel was prosecuted and found guilty of arson and murder. She had served 14 years of a life sentence when a law professor investigated the case and found the earlier investigation was faulty and relied on "junk science." Sponsor: RXBar.com/Suspect

18: Innocent Man Faces Electric Chair

Perry Cobb was sentenced to death for a murder he did not commit. Today he holds the record for the person tried the most times for the same murder. He was freed from death row by a young journalist and a new law school graduate, who defied political pressure to testify on Perry's behalf.

17: Smokescreen

Kristine Bunch served 17 years in prison for a crime that never happened. On June 30, 1995, the Indiana trailer where she lived erupted into flames. Her 3-year-old son, Tony, was found dead in his bedroom. Police immediately accused Bunch of arson, which she denied. A laboratory report was altered and based on this altered report she was convicted. Bunch tells the story of how she overcame the false conviction.

Safe at work

We introduce you to a new podcast by Wondery that contemplates challenges in the workplace. wondery.fm/suspect

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