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Most Recent Episodes

Portrait Of: 80s Ball Subculture in FX's 'Pose'

When you think of the 1980's in New York City, you might think of grit and crime—but a vibrant, dazzling underground ball scene? Maybe not. A new hit series on FX is now telling the stories of that scene: a subculture of LGBTQ people of color creating a safe and joyous space during a time when they were not accepted. "Pose" is making history by featuring the largest cast of transgender actors ever on TV as well as the largest recurring cast of LGBTQ actors for a scripted series. Actresses Mj Rodriguez and Indya Moore talk with Latino USA about their roles in the series.

Portrait Of: 80s Ball Subculture in FX's 'Pose'

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With You, Peru

The 1970s were a golden age for soccer in Peru, one that producer Janice Llamoca only heard about growing up in Los Angeles in the '90s. The Peruvian soccer team went to three World Cups in that era. But after that, the team did poorly for decades, failing to qualify for the World Cup year after year. Then in 2017, Peru qualified for the World Cup after 36 years—giving the Llamocas the opportunity of a lifetime to travel to Russia to see their team play on soccer's biggest stage.

With You, Peru

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Portrait Of: Tanya Saracho Gives Us 'Vida'

Tanya Saracho is the showrunner for acclaimed television series "Vida," on Starz. The show looks at the relationship between two sisters, Lyn and Emma, as they come to terms with the death of their mother and the secrets she kept from them. Saracho sits down with Latino USA to share the story of how she got where she is today and why telling complicated—sometimes dark— stories about Latinos is so important to her.

Portrait Of: Tanya Saracho Gives Us 'Vida'

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The Breakdown: Frida Barbie

When Mattel announced the release of a Barbie inspired by late Mexican painter Frida Kahlo, a flurry of tweets ensued. Many felt that Mattel was harming the legacy of the radical leftist painter who may not have wanted to be associated with one the greatest symbols of American consumerism. But while Frida Kahlo and Barbie may seem like antithetical symbols, their backstories have very interesting parallels—the main one being that both have played a big role in how we view what it means to be a modern woman. Producer Antonia Cereijido breaks down the history behind Frida and Barbie and how we got to a world in which such a doll exists.

The Breakdown: Frida Barbie

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Mexico's New, Leftist President

The recent presidential elections in Mexico were historic. For the first time in almost a century, Mexico will not be ruled by its two major political parties. After running for office twice before, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a.k.a. AMLO, was elected Mexico's first leftist president in decades, channeling anger at the nation's elites and campaigning with a strong anti-corruption message. Latino USA's María Hinojosa speaks with Mexican political analyst Denise Dresser about what this all means for Mexico's future.

Mexico's New, Leftist President

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Puerto Rico's Financial Storm, Part Two

Puerto Ricans are still recovering from the destruction left by Hurricane Maria last September, but a financial storm continues to take a toll on people on the island. In the second of a two-part series produced in collaboration with WNYC, we turn our attention to the austerity measures planned for Puerto Rico—particularly, cuts to the public university system. We follow Gabriel Negrón, an economics student at the University of Puerto Rico who has made it his mission to fight back against austerity measures.

Puerto Rico's Financial Storm, Part Two

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Puerto Rico's Financial Storm, Part One

Puerto Ricans are still rebuilding after Hurricane Maria devastated the island and its infrastructure last September. But, in some ways, the bigger story when it comes to Puerto Rico's long-term future is the island's economic crisis. In part one of a two-part series produced in collaboration with WNYC, we look at how Puerto Rico became mired in billions of dollars worth of debt, how it's affecting Puerto Ricans, and what the commonwealth is doing to try to dig itself out. Featuring veteran business reporter Jane Sasseen.

Puerto Rico's Financial Storm, Part One

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Junot & Me (Too)

In May, writer Junot Díaz was accused of misconduct by several female writers, including forcibly kissing one woman. The allegations set off a firestorm of tweets and think pieces about Díaz's behavior and how he fits into the growing #MeToo movement. For Latino USA's Amanda Alcantara, Díaz had been a kind of literary hero. So, after the allegations came out, she set off on a journey of introspection to figure out how she should feel about Díaz and his work—a journey that included heartfelt conversations, deleted tweets and even a mysterious anonymous email.

Junot & Me (Too)

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'#FreeAle': The Internet's Favorite Immigrant Activist

On March 7th, 2018, Alejandra Pablos, a reproductive rights and undocumented activist was detained by ICE and placed in the Eloy Detention Center in Arizona. A petition for her early release was launched by Mijente, a group that organizes around immigrant rights, and it circulated quickly on social media. Alejandra became a high profile activist with thousands of supporters. Latino USA looks at what Alejandra's story tells us about how undocumented activism is changing.

'#FreeAle': The Internet's Favorite Immigrant Activist

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The Remarkable Rebirth of Medellín

Medellín, Colombia, is lauded as one of the most innovative and tourist-friendly cities in the world. But 30 years ago, the city was the world's cocaine capital—ravaged by the cartel war led by Pablo Escobar. Latino USA travels to Medellín to hear how the city's violent and narcotic history changed the lives of one family and how Medellín went from being one of the most dangerous places in the world to the "model city" it is today.

The Remarkable Rebirth of Medellín

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