Latino USA Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.
Latino USA
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Latino USA

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Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.More from Latino USA »

Most Recent Episodes

I'm Not Dead

In the early 70s, Miguel Angel Villavicencio was focused on making his most ambitious dream possible: to become a famous singer in Bolivia and across the world. And he was halfway there—his love songs were on the radio and he was appearing on TV. But to take his singing career truly international, he needed money. So he decided to work for Bolivia's most powerful drug cartel in the 80s—a major supplier for Pablo Escobar. Choosing this path would lead him on a journey of self-destruction, unexpected betrayal and finally, redemption.

I'm Not Dead

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Portrait Of: 'Taina' and the Love of Nostalgia TV

In 2001, Nickelodeon started airing "Taina," a show about a Latina teen who attends a performing arts high school in NYC and daydreams of being a star. While the show only lasted two seasons, "Taina" is seared into the memories of many who grew up watching it, because at the time it was rare to see an authentic portrayal of what it was like to be a Nuyorican teen in the early 2000s. Maria Hinojosa talks to the show's award-winning creator Maria Perez-Brown, who is Nuyorican herself, about jumping into the world of children's television after being a tax lawyer.

Portrait Of: 'Taina'

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Portrait Of: Rapper Immortal Technique

Felipe Coronel, aka Immortal Technique, is a legendary underground hip-hop artist known for his skills on the mic and his raw, highly political lyrics. The Peruvian-American rapper became well-known for his first album in 2001, "Revolutionary Vol. 1." Tech says growing up in Harlem during the 80's and 90's caused him to harbor a lot of rage. Much of his music discusses colonialism, poverty, and corruption. We sit down with Immortal Technique to get a deeper sense of what it was like growing up in Harlem and how his rage has played into his successful music career.

Portrait Of: Rapper Immortal Technique

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Portrait Of: The Latinas of 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine'

Melissa Fumero and Stephanie Beatriz play Amy Santiago and Rosa Diaz, two Latina detectives in the diverse comedy series 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine.' The show premiered on Fox in 2013 and was canceled in 2017. But after fans expressed their anger, NBC took over the production and the sixth season will start on January 10th. The actresses both talk with Maria Hinojosa about how they got their roles, growing up between two worlds and struggling to find their identity. Stephanie also talks about her decision to disclose her sexuality on social media—and talk about it in the show.

Portrait Of: The Latinas of 'Brooklyn Nine-Nine'

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All They Will Call You Will Be Deportees

After a fiery plane crash in 1948, all 32 people onboard died—but they weren't all treated the same after death. Twenty-eight of the passengers were migrant workers from Mexico and they were buried in a mass grave. The other four were Americans and had their remains returned to their families for proper burial. It took the work of a determined Mexican-American author to find out who the Mexican passengers were and tell their stories. In this episode rerun, Latino USA follows Tim Hernandez on his seven-year journey to give names to the dead—a journey that all started with a Woody Guthrie song. This story first ran in February 2017.

All They Will Call You

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Two-Step Into the New Year

Happy 2019! If you're a long-time listener, you might know we have a tradition of doing a special show around New Year's, full of our favorite music stories of the year. Today, a selection of music pieces, including several that have not been previously aired on the podcast. We begin with the dreamy nostalgia pop of Cuco, then move on to a Los Angeles remake of a Peruvian chicha classic, "Cariñito." Mexican rapper Niña Dioz shares how she navigates a male-dominated music industry, and Grammy award-winning salsa legend Eddie Palmieri gets personal in a one-on-one conversation with Maria Hinojosa.

Two-Step Into the New Year

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Bonus: Traces of Alicia

A couple of months ago, we shared the story of Latino USA producer Sayre Quevedo as he searched for his lost family in an episode titled 'The Quevedos,' which was nominated for Best Audio Documentary at the 2018 IDA Awards. Today, we bring you a moment from Sayre's search that never made it to air, when he learns something important about his grandmother Alicia.

Bonus: Traces of Alicia

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Abuelos

In this special holiday rebroadcast episode, Latino USA explores the special bond between Latinos and their grandparents. We talk to TV's most famous Latina grandma Ivonne Coll, the abuela on "Glee," "Jane the Virgin" and "Switched at Birth." We hear stories of grandparents raising their grandchildren, including a Dominican grandma who supported her transgender granddaughter when no one else would. We also chat with Chilean writer Isabel Allende about how her grandparents put the magic in her magical realism. Plus, some grandparent memories from our listeners.

Abuelos

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The Return

Javier Zamora was nine years old when he made the journey from El Salvador to the U.S.-Mexico border. Now, nearly 20 years later, he has to return to the country where he was born, to apply for a visa to that will allow him to continue to live in the U.S. We follow Javier's return in his own words: through audio diaries, archival family tape, and interviews. "The Return" is an intimate portrait of what gets left behind when we immigrate and what we can gain when we return.

The Return of Javier Zamora

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Portrait Of: Alfonso Cuarón's Roma

Roma is Alfonso Cuarón's most personal film to date. Inspired by his own childhood growing up in Mexico City, the two central characters in the film are women: Cleo, an indigenous domestic worker and Margarita, Cleo's employer and a middle-class single mother of four. Cuarón sat down with Maria Hinojosa to talk about the role of women in his life and what it was like to grow up in Mexico in the early 1970s.

Portrait Of: Alfonso Cuarón's Roma

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