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Latino USA

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Latino USA, the radio journal of news and culture, is the only national, English-language radio program produced from a Latino perspective.More from Latino USA »

Most Recent Episodes

#1750 - The Politics of Being White

In progressive Minneapolis, an open letter is written to a white candidate for city council questioning his decision to run against a Latina incumbent in a time of "deep racial pain." In California, a Colombian man who identifies with his Spanish heritage tries to join the so-called "alt-right," and hits some bumps in the road. This week on Latino USA, we look at the complicated identity politics of whiteness in the Trump era. And, we examine the question of whether or not more and more Latinos will identify with whiteness in the future.

#1750 - The Politics of Being White

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#1749 - ...The Tough Get Going

When the going gets tough, people may tell you to "look for a silver lining" or to "turn lemons into lemonade." But that's all easier said than done, right? On this episode we're bringing you stories of people who ended up in dark places but somehow found the light. We talk to fashion designer Mondo Guerra, from Project Runway, about how his most painful experience became the inspiration that launched his career. We also learn about Los Prisioneros, a punk band that fought a dictatorship in Chile, and we meet a young man who became a video game superstar while caring for his ailing mother.

#1749 - ...The Tough Get Going

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#1748 - The Tech Industry's Leaky Pipeline

No matter the measure, whether it's race, class, or gender, the tech industry does not reflect the American work force. In this episode of Latino USA, we look at that "pipeline" that brings workers into the tech industry —from programs aimed at middle schoolers to an algorithm that is supposed to eliminate bias from the hiring process— to find out where the leaks are.

#1748 - The Tech Industry's Leaky Pipeline

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#1747 - It's a Small World, After All

With the release of Coco, Disney Pixar's film about the Day of the Dead, Latino USA takes a look back at Disney's relationship with Latin America. We start in the 1940s when Walt Disney and a group of animators were deployed by the U.S. government to Latin America in efforts to curb Nazi influence there. Then we hear from a Chilean writer who wrote a book called "How to Read Donald Duck" critiquing Disney comics' American imperialism in the 1070's. His book would later be burned in Chile. And finally, we talk with the directors of Coco, Lee Unkrich and Adrian Molina.

#1747 - It's a Small World, After All

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#1746 - The Scars of War

In honor of Veteran's Day, a collection of stories and interviews with veterans exploring stress, trauma, and transformation after military service. We hear from a married couple who divorced after redeployment, and from an army mechanic who became a YouTube beauty guru. Veteran, actor, and motivational speaker J.R. Martinez talks to Maria Hinojosa about surviving an explosion that burned a third of his body, and about how his family helped him through it. Plus, what does it mean to go to war for a country that wants to deport you?

#1746 - The Scars of War

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#1745 - It Happened in L.A.

Latino USA heads to the great city of Los Angeles to tell stories about hidden L.A. history. In the 1950s, a Mexican-American community is evicted in the area where Dodger Stadium now stands. We'll hear from actor Carlos Gomez about his role in a new show about the Menendez brothers, a case the rocked the city. And a new mural unveiled at Union Station in the heart of L.A., once hidden for its controversial depictions of Latino history, is now part of a celebration of Latino art.

#1745 - It Happened in L.A.

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#1744 - Cultural Appropriation... It's Not Just a White Thing

It's that time of year again: the time of pumpkin spice lattes, haunted houses... and talks of cultural appropriation. However, this time we put a spin on this hot-button issue: what does cultural appropriation look like when it occurs between people of color? We dive into the the hairstyle that has taken the internet by storm the past couple of weeks: Chinese-American Jeremy Lin's dreadlocks. You'll also hear a roundtable about instances of cultural appropriation in pop culture, and get into how a group of indigenous advocates are working with the U.N. to make cultural appropriation illegal.

#1744 - Cultural Appropriation... It's Not Just a White Thing

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#1743 - Surviving the Storm

A man is in his kitchen when water rushes through the door, nearly drowning him. A mother is unable to reach her son in prison, and is desperate to know whether or not he's doing ok. Another man, who requires electricity to power the ventilator that keeps him alive, struggles to find a generator to plug into after the power grid fails. Latino USA producer Andres Caballero visits Puerto Rico to record stories of surviving hurricane Maria—and the devastating consequences of the storm.

#1743 - Surviving the Storm

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#1742 - Latino Heroes of Rock & Roll

When we talk about what made rock & roll as we know it, the most common answer is: a mixture of R&B, a predominantly black genre, and country, a predominantly white genre. We explore the Latino influences that helped shape rock & roll, and we profile unsung Latino rock artists who had a hand in crafting the sound—which is not as black and white as many think.

#1742 - Latino Heroes of Rock & Roll

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#1741 - A Border Drawn In Blood

This week marks the 80th anniversary of the Perejil Massacre, in which Dominican soldiers under dictator Rafael Trujillo massacred thousands of Haitians living near the Dominican-Haitian border. After the massacre, the Dominican press didn't carry the story and Trujillo attempted to sweep the killings under the rug of history. Today, the massacre is little discussed, and there are no monuments or memorials for the dead. Latino USA travels to the Dominican-Haitian border to ask the question—why don't people want to talk about it? And what are the consequences today?

#1741 - A Border Drawn In Blood

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