Latino USA Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.
Latino USA
NPR

Latino USA

From NPR

Latino USA offers insight into the lived experiences of Latino communities and is a window on the current and merging cultural, political and social ideas impacting Latinos and the nation.

Most Recent Episodes

Spanish As A First Language

Being a new parent comes with a series of challenges—one being the decision whether or not to teach your child a second language. Latino USA explores the world of bilingual parenting through the story of two Dominican-American siblings growing up in the South, one who was drawn to Spanish and the other who never wanted to speak it. Both of the siblings are now parents and faced with the question: to teach your kids Spanish or not to teach your kids Spanish?

Spanish as a First Language

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The Movement For Indigenous Peoples' Day

In the U.S., Columbus Day is a federal holiday in honor of the Italian navigator Christopher Columbus—and it's a day of Italian-American celebration. But not everyone is on board with celebrating Columbus. His colonization led to the bloodshed of Indigenous people and while he did arrive to the Americas, he never set foot in North America. Over the past few decades, there has been a growing movement to officially replace the holiday with a day of recognition for Indigenous people. Latino USA explores the movement to change the holiday, and pays a visit to one of the latest states to make Indigenous Peoples' Day official: Maine.

The Movement For Indigenous Peoples’ Day

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A Day In The Life Of Pitbull

Armando Christian Pérez —better known as Pitbull— is a rapper, entrepreneur, motivational speaker, brand ambassador and has a whole host of other job titles. As his nearly two-decade long career has diversified, his image and brand have solidified. He rose to prominence off bilingual records hits like "Culo" and "Toma" in the early aughts and became a household name thanks to wedding and quinceañera classics like "Give Me Everything" and "Time of Our Lives." Today, the Latino demographic that helped catapult Pitbull to the top music charts is facing greater open discrimination than at any other point during Pitbull's career. During a day with Pitbull, the Cuban-American entertainer opens up about his thoughts on President Trump, the state of immigration, why he won't stop making music with Chris Brown, and how country music is not just for white folks.

A Day In The Life Of Pitbull

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How I Made It: KAINA

Chicago is a breeding ground for diverse sounds: it is the birthplace of house music and has a thriving indie hip-hop scene. One of the city's up-and-coming artists is Kaina Castillo. Known simply as KAINA, the 23-year-old singer-songwriter blends genres like soul and rock, creating dreamy soundscapes. A Latina of Venezuelan and Guatemalan descent, she writes about struggling with her identity, all while uplifting her immigrant roots. In this "How I Made It" segment, KAINA tells us about what it was like growing up with a small family, making a name for herself in Chicago's vibrant music scene and the inspiration behind her album.

How I Made It: KAINA

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Weed The People

Throughout his decades of selling weed, Ramón García never thought he'd see the day marijuana became legal in California. But while he now owns a legitimate cannabis distribution business, he's ambivalent about the legalization of pot. Ramón says it seems like legalization has only made white entrepreneurs rich, while black and Latino weed dealers bore the brunt of the war on drugs. In this episode, Latino USA shadows two Latinx weed entrepreneurs, and we try to figure out whether a new program by the city of Oakland can help make up for decades of racist drug policies.

Weed The People

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Portrait Of: Isabel Allende

Author Isabel Allende began her writing career as a journalist in Chile. Born in Peru, Allende grew up in Chile until 1973, when her uncle, former Chilean President Salvador Allende, was overthrown in a coup and died. She fled the country along with her family, and lived many years in Venezuela as a political refugee. That's where she wrote her break-out novel, "La Casa de Los Espíritus" or "The House of the Spirits." Since then, she's written 23 books and counting. Latino USA sits down with Isabel Allende to talk about her journey to becoming a renowned author.

Portrait Of: Isabel Allende

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Lou Diamond Phillips Reflects On 'La Bamba' 30 Years Later

It's been over three decades since actor Lou Diamond Phillips portrayed Chicano rock 'n' roll legend Ritchie Valens on the silver screen. Little did he know, his role in the 1987 film, "La Bamba," would catapult him into the limelight and into the hearts of the Mexican American community around the country. A year after "La Bamba," he starred in another prominent Chicano film from the late 1980s, "Stand and Deliver." Since then, Phillips—who is the son of a white American father and a Filipina mother—has portrayed Latino and indigenous characters in film and television shows. In this conversation, Lou Diamond Phillips shares how he continues to play an array of roles with an open mind and willingness to learn.

Lou Diamond Phillips

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The Breakdown: The Spell Of Yma Sumac

In the 1950s, singer and diva Yma Sumac took over the North American airwaves with her mystical voice. The Queen of Exotica and Inca Princess was said to cast a spell on anyone who came across her with her exotic look and nearly five-octave range. But while Yma Sumac rose to prominence across the globe, the Peruvian public in her home country was not seduced by her song—or her representation of indigenous Peruvians. Today, Latino USA breaks down the phenomena behind one of the original divas, her conflicts and criticisms, and the impact of her legacy.

The Spell of Yma Sumac

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A Conversation With Bernie Sanders

Four years ago, Senator Bernie Sanders began a long-shot campaign for the presidency. Until then, Sanders was a relatively unknown independent senator from Vermont, with some very progressive ideas. His campaign turned out to be much stronger than predicted, and this election cycle Bernie Sanders is one of the front-runners in the Democratic primary. Maria Hinojosa sits down with Sanders to talk about how his upbringing in a working class family shaped him, his views on immigration, and why Latinos should vote for him.

A Conversation With Bernie Sanders

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How I Made It: Honduran Photographer Tomas Ayuso

Tomas Ayuso is a photographer who decided to challenge the way mainstream media was documenting violence and trauma in Central America. Through his project, "The Right to Grow Old," Ayuso humanizes stories of individuals across Honduras. In this segment of "How I Made It," Tomas shares how he met Moises and Meya, two of the people he documented for his project, and how he followed them from Honduras as they made their way to the U.S.-Mexico border.

Honduran Photographer Tomas Ayuso

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