Here & Now Anytime The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.
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Here & Now Anytime

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The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

Most Recent Episodes

How cities are addressing record-high homelessness

Pro-Palestinian demonstrations are growing around the U.S. Hatem Abudayyeh of the Chicago-based U.S. Palestinian Community Network joins us. Then, the number of people experiencing homelessness reached a record high in 2023. We speak with local officials from Burlington, Vermont, and Bakersfield, California, working to end the crisis. And, video game creator Jordan Mechner talks about his new graphic novel, "Replay," which interweaves his personal history with the story of how his family escaped the Nazis.

How cities are addressing record-high homelessness

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Trump's alleged 'hush money' scheme, explained

Russia launched airstrikes on the Ukrainian city of Chernihiv on Wednesday, killing 18 people. The Washington Post's Siobhan O'Grady shares the latest. Then, Georgetown law professor Mary McCord explains Trump's criminal trial in New York. And, author Lissa Soep talks about her new book, "Other People's Words," where she reflects on how the voices of people who have died continue to speak through their loved ones and her.

Trump's alleged 'hush money' scheme, explained

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Grift cards: The gift card fraud scheme costing consumers millions

Workers at a Tennessee Volkswagen plant are voting on whether to unionize. Michael Martinez of Automotive News shares the latest. Then, are we in a new era of drone warfare? RAND political scientist Caitlin Lee weighs in. And, ProPublica's Craig Silverman talks about a coordinated gift card scam that totals hundreds of millions of dollars.

Grift cards: The gift card fraud scheme costing consumers millions

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He escaped Sudan in 1999. But his family is still trapped there

We look at how Israelis are reacting to Iran's attack with Israeli diplomat Alon Pinkas. Kerem Navot founder Dror Etkes talks about Israeli settlers in the West Bank attacking Palestinian villages. Then, one year into Sudan's civil war, we hear from one Sudanese-American whose family is trapped in Khartoum. And, NBA columnist A. Sherrod Blakely talks about the league's Play-In tournament and Caitlin Clark's WNBA draft by the Indiana Fever.

He escaped Sudan in 1999. But his family is still trapped there

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Runners Kara Goucher and Des Linden talk women in sports, doping

We discuss Iran's unprecedented attack on Israel with journalist Borzou Daragahi and security analyst Jim Walsh. Then, PolitiFact's Lou Jacobson breaks down the facts of Trump's hush money trial. And, distance-running legends Des Linden and Kara Goucher talk about their new podcast "Nobody Asked Us," the future of women's running and more.

Runners Kara Goucher and Des Linden talk women in sports, doping

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Do I need therapy? Why one psychologist says maybe not

After fleeing the war in Gaza with the help of the American government, a family of four is denied entry into the U.S. Then, Dr. Neha Lalani tells us why popular diabetes and weight loss drugs like Ozempic may be impacting fertility. And, does everyone really need therapy to cope? Clinical psychologist Emily Edlynn explains why she says no. Ask your mental health questions here.

Do I need therapy? Why one psychologist says maybe not

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Oregon drumline follows the rhythm to national competition

NPR's Deepa Shivaram breaks down the Biden Administration's new rule requiring anyone who sells guns to run background checks. Then, OJ Simpson has died at 76. Laurie Levenson, who was an analyst for CBS during Simpson's murder trial, joins us. And, director René Ormae-Jarmer and snare drummer Grant Lord tell us how the Kingsmen Thunder Drumline from Milwaukie, Oregon, is preparing for one of the biggest competitions of their lives.

Oregon drumline follows the rhythm to national competition

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How Arizonans are reacting to state's near-total abortion ban

A doctor who provides abortion care in Phoenix discusses the court ruling that allows an almost total abortion ban to go into effect in the state. Republican state Rep. David Cook, who supported the state's 15-week ban, explains why he thinks the court got this ruling wrong. Then, Will Freeman, fellow for Latin American Studies at the Council for Foreign Relations, explains what Ecuador's raid of a Mexican embassy means for diplomatic norms in the future. And, Democrat Dakota Adams — the son of Stewart Rhodes, founder of the far-right extremist Oath Keepers — tells us about his campaign for a seat in the Montana state Senate.

How Arizonans are reacting to state's near-total abortion ban

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After earning his bachelor's degree behind bars, he's heading to law school

Imam Mohammad Ali Elahi, spiritual leader of the Islamic House of Wisdom in Dearborn Heights, Michigan, reflects on the end of Ramadan. Then, Benard McKinley talks about his journey from earning his bachelor's degree in prison to attending law school. And, famed soprano Renée Fleming dives into the new book she edited, "Music and Mind: Harnessing the Arts for Health and Wellness."

After earning his bachelor's degree behind bars, he's heading to law school

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Look up and get down: A soundtrack for your solar eclipse

Allyson Bieryla, a creator of the LightSounds project, explains how a small device that translates light into sound can help blind people and people with low vision experience the eclipse. And, Silvia Piccinotti, who's taking her kids to Texas to see the eclipse, gives advice on keeping children safe and explaining the phenomenon to them. Then, Here & Now's Mike Moschetto shares his soundtrack for watching the moon cover the sun.

Look up and get down: A soundtrack for your solar eclipse

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