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How Mitch McConnell Is Shaping American Politics

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is one of the most powerful men in Washington. A Republican from Kentucky, McConnell has occasionally drawn criticism not only from Democrats but from Republicans who see him as the consummate Washington insider, even as he's been successful at achieving GOP goals. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson discusses McConnell's career, rise to power and lasting impact on American politics with Paul Kane, senior congressional correspondent and columnist for The Washington Post.

How Mitch McConnell Is Shaping American Politics

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July 13, 2018: Hour 1

NBC senior politics editor Beth Fouhy and Associated Press reporter Jesse Holland join us to review the week in politics, including Trump's U.K. visit, summit with NATO allies and upcoming meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. Also, the Thai cave rescue story captivated audiences for weeks. But other concurrent disasters, like deadly flooding in Japan and the wreck of a tourist boat off the Thai coast, received less attention. We take a look at why some stories seem grab audiences more than others. And one tennis reporter explains how Wimbledon, the world's oldest tennis tournament, has come to occupy a special place in the hearts of many players and fans. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 13, 2018 full broadcast.

July 13, 2018: Hour 1

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July 13, 2018: Hour 2

July 13, 2018: Hour 2

July 13, 2018: Hour 2

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July 12, 2018: Hour 2

For a second day in a row, President Trump scrambled the calculus at the NATO summit in Brussels. We discuss what happened and the state of the alliance with Nina Jankowicz, global fellow at the Wilson Center. Also, Scott Dozier would have become the first death row inmate in the U.S. to be executed with the synthetic opioid fentanyl. But hours before the planned execution on Wednesday, a Nevada judge suspended the execution. And on this week's Here & Now DJ Session, host Jeremy Hobson turns up the summer jams with Eric J. Lawrence, DJ at KCRW. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 12, 2018 full broadcast.

July 12, 2018: Hour 2

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July 12, 2018: Hour 1

We discuss the latest on FBI agent Peter Strzok's testimony on Capitol Hill on Thursday with NPR political reporter Tim Mak. Also, during the tobacco picking season in North Carolina, it's all hands on deck — and some of those hands belong to kids as young as 7 years old. And our resident chef Kathy Gunst shares recipes for fish, pork and chicken and black bean tacos which can easily be adapted to serve a hungry summer crowd. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 12, 2018 full broadcast.

July 12, 2018: Hour 1

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July 11, 2018: Hour 2

Republican strategist Alice Stewart and Democratic strategist Angela Rye join us to sort through the politics of President Trump's Supreme Court nomination this week and his summits with NATO and Russian President Vladimir Putin. Also, Jimmy Miller is one of the thousands of children born during the Vietnam War to a U.S. military father and a Vietnamese mother. When a bill was introduced in the U.S. Senate that helped many of these "Amerasians," as they're called, come to the U.S., Miller went searching for his father. And a new study published this week in the field of senolytics might provide a key to anti-aging. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 11, 2018 full broadcast.

July 11, 2018: Hour 2

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July 11, 2018: Hour 1

We get perspective on President Trump's NATO criticism from John Hannah, a former foreign policy adviser in the George W. Bush and Clinton administrations. Also, Whitney Houston rocketed to stardom when she was in her early 20s, and went on to become one of the best-selling musical artists of all time. But her personal life was bedeviled by drugs, family and marital issues. We talk with the director of the new documentary "Whitney," which explores Houston's life. And Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell successfully blocked President Obama's pick for the Supreme Court in 2016. Now, he's overseeing the confirmation of another. Washington Post senior congressional correspondent Paul Kane tells us more about McConnell's rise to Senate leadership. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 11, 2018 full broadcast.

July 11, 2018: Hour 1

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July 10, 2018: Hour 2

President Trump begins a diplomatic gauntlet when he departs for Brussels on Tuesday. We discuss what's ahead for Trump during the NATO summit and his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin with Leon Panetta, who served as both CIA director and secretary of defense under President Obama. Also, we remember Leo Sarkisian, creator of the Voice of America radio show "Music Time in Africa." Sarkisian died in June at age 97. And immigrant children in Denmark as young as 1 year old must attend day care for 30 hours a week for instruction in "Danish values," according to a new law that's part of a broader "ghetto package" designed to force immigrants living in 25 mostly Muslim enclaves to assimilate. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 10, 2018 full broadcast.

July 10, 2018: Hour 2

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July 10, 2018: Hour 1

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, if confirmed, should recuse himself from cases involving investigations of President Trump, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) tells Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson. Also, in April 2014, Flint, Michigan, changed its water source and residents were exposed to high levels of lead and other pollutants. Reporter Anna Clark writes about the factors that led to the crisis in her new book "The Poisoned City: Flint's Water and The American Urban Tragedy." And a law professor at the University of Louisville who clerked for both Kavanaugh and Justice Anthony Kennedy joins us to react to the 53-year-old judge's nomination to the Supreme Court. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 10, 2018 full broadcast.

July 10, 2018: Hour 1

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July 9, 2018: Hour 2

President Trump is expected to reveal his nominee to take over retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy's Supreme Court seat Monday night. NPR's Ron Elving joins us to discuss what might be ahead. Also, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar has indicated that the Port Isabel Detention Center in south Texas could be the site of migrant family reunifications, a facility that human rights attorney Sara E. Dill likens to a prison. And a soccer ball that survived the 1986 explosion of the space shuttle Challenger has completed a long journey — including a trip to the International Space Station — back to the high school where it came from. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 9, 2018 full broadcast.

July 9, 2018: Hour 2

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