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Most Recent Episodes

Fired Police Officer Wins Back Her Pension; Squirrel Week Winner

Cariol Horne is a former Black police officer who was fired after she intervened to stop a white police officer from choke holding a Black suspect. She joins us to talk about winning back her pension, And, a cheeky chipmunk won the 11th Annual Squirrel Week Photo Contest. Mary Rabadan speaks about how she took the winning shot.

Fired Police Officer Wins Back Her Pension; Squirrel Week Winner

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Robert Duvall Turns 90; Historical Look At Police Violence

Robert Duvall turned 90 in January. We speak with the award-winning actor about his vast career. And, Imani Perry, professor at Princeton University, joins us to frame today's police brutality against Black Americans with a historical perspective.

Robert Duvall Turns 90; Historical Look At Police Violence

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Minnesota Mosques Distribute Vaccines; 'White Gaze' Memoir

In Minnesota, Muslim leaders led a vaccination campaign in the lead-up to Ramadan, with nearly 7,000 vaccines distributed across 16 mosques. Imam Asad discusses the effort. And, in "Surviving the White Gaze," Rebecca Carroll explores the world of interracial adoption through the lens of her own story growing up as the only Black person in her rural New Hampshire community.

Minnesota Mosques Distribute Vaccines; 'White Gaze' Memoir

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Malcolm-Jamal Warner On 'The Resident'; Protests In Minnesota

Malcolm-Jamal Warner talks about starring in the Fox show "The Resident," winning a Grammy and "The Cosby Show." And, as the trial of Derek Chauvin continues in Minneapolis, protests continued for a second night in the neighboring suburb of Brooklyn Center after Daunte Wright was shot and killed by a police officer. NPR's David Schaper shares the latest from Minneapolis.

Malcolm-Jamal Warner On 'The Resident'; Protests In Minnesota

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DMX's Everlasting Legacy; Terence Blanchard's 'Da 5 Bloods' Score

Jazz composer Terence Blanchard is nominated for an Oscar for Best Original Score for his work on Spike Lee's "Da 5 Bloods." He joins us. And, rapper DMX has died but his legacy will live forever. The Undefeated's Justin Tinsley explains the lessons to embrace from DMX's life and death.

DMX's Everlasting Legacy; Terence Blanchard's 'Da 5 Bloods' Score

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Renewable Energy Under Biden; Mermaid Museums

Biden's infrastructure plan promises to clean up the country's electricity system. Leah Stoke, assistant professor of political science at UC Santa Barbara, explains. And, two new museums devoted to mermaids recently opened independently of each other. Tom Banse of the Northwest News Network gives us a look into the museum in Washington state.

Renewable Energy Under Biden; Mermaid Museums

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Brockhampton's 'Roadrunner: New Light, New Machine'; Sea Turtle Nests

Brockhampton announced that their new album, "Roadrunner: New Light, New Machine," will be one of their last. Kevin Abstract and Romil Hemnani discuss how a year in isolation shaped the new sound. And, the state of Georgia is concerned that loggerhead sea turtles nest now face a threat from a federal change in ship canal dredging. WABE's Molly Samuel reports.

Brockhampton's 'Roadrunner: New Light, New Machine'; Sea Turtle Nests

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Future Of Electric Cars; Impact Of Arecibo Telescope Collapse

Biden's infrastructure plan calls for $174 billion to rev up the American market for electric cars. We speak to Nora Naughton, WSJ auto reporter, and Jonathan Levy of electric vehicle charging company EVgo. And, writer Daniel Alarcón says when the world-renowned Arecibo telescope collapsed in December, it was a crushing blow to astronomers and to the island of Puerto Rico.

Future Of Electric Cars; Impact Of Arecibo Telescope Collapse

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Rhiannon Giddens' New Album; Trauma From Systemic Racism

Rhiannon Giddens joins us to discuss "They're Calling Me Home," the new album she recorded with her partner Francesco Turrisi. And, Minneapolis racial trauma expert Resmaa Menakem says for Black and Brown Americans, trauma is passed down from generation to generation, becoming a physical manifestation of the systemic racism the U.S. is only now starting to acknowledge.

Rhiannon Giddens' New Album; Trauma From Systemic Racism

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Rethinking Personal Boundaries After COVID-19; Camden's 'Hoodbrarian'

As more people get vaccinated for COVID-19, journalist Celeste Headlee says this time can serve as an opportunity to rethink what our personal lives could look like going forward. And, WHYY's P. Kenneth Burns tells us about one woman helping to bring more books to Camden, New Jersey's more than 70,000 residents.

Rethinking Personal Boundaries After COVID-19; Camden's 'Hoodbrarian'

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