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August 14, 2018: Hour 2

Some Blue Cross Blue Shield patients in Texas may have to foot the bill if they go to out-of-network emergency rooms for conditions that are not deemed serious. Also, as fighters with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection risk their lives battling wildfires in the state, they are joined by a group of nearly 4,000 inmates. And Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst's peach tree is bearing fruit. She brings hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson a peach chutney, peach jam and a peach pie. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 14, 2018 full broadcast.

August 14, 2018: Hour 2

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August 14, 2018: Hour 1

We get the latest from NPR senior European correspondent Sylvia Poggioli after a highway bridge collapsed in Genoa, Italy, during a storm. Also, we continue our trip to Hudson Yards, the largest private real estate development in U.S. history, and take a look at how it compares to another real estate development that used to be just a few miles to the south. And the Trump administration has been using economic sanctions and tariffs to get other countries to bend to the will of the United States. One economist with the Council on Foreign Relations discusses the effectiveness and risks of that strategy. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 14, 2018 full broadcast.

August 14, 2018: Hour 1

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August 13, 2018: Hour 2

NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith joins us to discuss the latest in politics, including President Trump's criticism of former White House staffer Omarosa Manigault-Newman on Twitter Monday. Also, The Washington Post's Terrence McCoy wrote an article in July reporting on the isolation workers in a Pennsylvania chicken processing facility say they feel because they don't speak Spanish, and how it might lead them to support anti-immigration policies. After the story published, McCoy's inbox exploded. And Yemen is in the midst of a bloody civil war that the U.N. says has caused the world's worst humanitarian crisis. We hear from the president and CEO of Oxfam America, who was recently in Yemen. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 13, 2018 full broadcast.

August 13, 2018: Hour 2

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August 13, 2018: Hour 1

The FBI has fired agent Peter Strzok, who helped lead the FBI investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election but was discovered to be sending anti-Trump texts. Also, a major real estate development called Hudson Yards, on the West Side of Manhattan, is on the cusp of opening its slew of office space, retail stores, condos and more. We visit New York to learn more about the vision for the project and what it might add to an already bustling Manhattan. And there are a number of unanswered questions about how an airline employee was able to steal a plane at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The employee died when he crashed the plane. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 13, 2018 full broadcast.

August 13, 2018: Hour 1

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How Borders Shape Our World

In a special episode of the Here & Now podcast, we consider borders — the dividing lines in our world. Development economist Michael Clemens tells us that easing border restrictions would double world GDP, as workers move to countries where they can be more productive. Also, we learn more about a musical ensemble that couldn't get the recognition it deserved until the Iron Curtain came down: The Mystery of the Bulgarian Voices, formerly known as the Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir. We discuss the image of borders in literature and film with Arizona State University professor Claudia Sadowski-Smith, and hear from Mary Ann Mendoza, whose son Brandon was killed in 2014 after his police car was hit by an intoxicated driver who was in the U.S. illegally. And we close with another personal story: the opportunity that drove one young man to leave El Salvador and enter the U.S. illegally when he was 15 years old.

How Borders Shape Our World

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August 10, 2018: Hour 2

NASA expects to launch a space probe Saturday that will explore the atmosphere around the sun. We learn more from NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce and Geoff Brumfiel, and discuss the Trump administration's announcement that it will create a military "Space Force." Also, Michael Moore releases his documentary "Fahrenheit 11/9" on Sept. 21. The film is a continuation of Moore's anti-Trump crusade, which was also at the center of his one-man show which ran on Broadway last year. And November's midterm elections are fast approaching — but some voters may find they're no longer registered to vote, even if they're eligible. The Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law School has released research showing an uptick in voter roll purges, including some removals that it says are illegal. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 10, 2018 full broadcast.

August 10, 2018: Hour 2

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August 10, 2018: Hour 1

We discuss the week in politics, including former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort's trial and major elections in Ohio and Kansas, with NBC senior politics editor Beth Fouhy and NPR lead politics editor Domenico Montanaro. Also, Marlon Portillo came to the U.S. as an unaccompanied minor from El Salvador 12 years ago. Since then, he's qualified for DACA status, graduated from high school and is working toward a bachelor's degree in history. And Sacha Baron Cohen's "Who Is America?" traps its subjects — often right-wing politicians and activists — and gets them to say and do outrageous things. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans shares his take on the controversial Showtime series. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 10, 2018 full broadcast.

August 10, 2018: Hour 1

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August 9, 2018: Hour 2

When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico last year, it destroyed homes, businesses and jobs, leaving a catastrophic environmental mess and fiscal crisis in its wake. Connecticut Public Radio's Diane Orson visited Puerto Rico and spoke with artists about how shifting financial priorities could affect the arts. Also, we hear from Wendy Adams, research grant director for the Bay Area Lyme Foundation, about her recent research that found Lyme disease-carrying ticks in 83 new counties across the country. And today at the Pentagon, Vice President Mike Pence laid out the Trump administration's plan to create the first new branch of the U.S. military in more than 70 years: a "Space Force." Space journalist and Alabama Public Radio news director Pat Duggins has the latest. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's Aug. 9, 2018 full broadcast.

August 9, 2018: Hour 2

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August 9, 2018: Hour 1

We round up the latest media stories with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik, including Tribune Media pulling the plug on its proposed $3.9 billion merger with Sinclair Broadcast Group, and Google, Facebook and Apple removing content from conspiracy theorist Alex Jones from their sites. Also, we hear from Mary Ann Mendoza, whose son Brandon was killed in 2014 after his police car was hit by an intoxicated driver who was in the U.S. illegally. She's calling for stricter immigration laws. And Here & Now sports analyst Mike Pesca joins us to take a look at two teams enjoying terrific seasons in Major League Baseball. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 9, 2018 full broadcast.

August 9, 2018: Hour 1

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August 8, 2018: Hour 1

We round up Tuesday's primary and election results with NPR's Jessica Taylor and Brian Ellison of KCUR. Also, pop singer-songwriter Jason Mraz is out with his sixth studio album this week, "Know." "When I feel good, I sing," he tells Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson, "and then singing makes me feel good, and it just escalates and becomes a constant feel-good experience." And developers often cite regulations as one big reason for the lack of home building. In the Bay Area, including San Francisco, where the housing crisis is arguably the worst in the nation, a new group is fighting regulations: the "yes in my backyard," or YIMBY, movement. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's Aug. 8, 2018 full broadcast.

August 8, 2018: Hour 1

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