Here & Now NPR and WBUR's live midday news program
Here & Now

Here & Now

From NPR

NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

Most Recent Episodes

May 20, 2019: In Prison For 13 Years, Man Exonerated After Defending Himself

Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Hassan Bennett, who has been out of prison for two weeks after defending himself in a retrial of his 13-year-old case — and winning. Also, as more than 1.8 million recent college grads begin jobs and paying off loans, we have some money advice for them. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 20, 2019 full broadcast.

May 20, 2019: In Prison For 13 Years, Man Exonerated After Defending Himself

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May 20, 2019: Morehouse Grads' Debt Eliminated; Family Sticks To Zero-Waste Regimen

After a billionaire Robert F. Smith surprised nearly 400 graduates of Morehouse College by announcing he would eliminate their student debt, we check in with one of those students. Also, about 10 years ago, Bea Johnson made a major life change: She slashed consumption of disposable products to create a zero-waste home. Now, her family's yearly trash can fit into a small jar. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 20, 2019 full broadcast.

May 20, 2019: Morehouse Grads' Debt Eliminated; Family Sticks To Zero-Waste Regimen

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May 17, 2019: Fall Enrollment Remains Open At Many Colleges; Trade War's Toll On Farmers

There's a resource for high school graduates who missed college application deadlines: a list of more than 400 schools still accepting applications. Also, Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd speaks with Davie Stephens, a soy farmer and president of the American Soybean Association, about the trade war between the U.S. and China. He says it's causing an emotional strain for farmers. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 17, 2019 full broadcast.

May 17, 2019: Fall Enrollment Remains Open At Many Colleges; Trade War's Toll On Farmers

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May 17, 2019: Remembering I.M. Pei; The Bronx Gets A Bookstore To Call Its Own

Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei, who designed the Louvre, died earlier this week at age 102. He added elegance to landscapes from the East to the West. Also while the Bronx is nearly as big as Manhattan, it had no general interest bookstore — until Noëlle Santos quit her job and opened The Lit. Bar last month. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 17, 2019 full broadcast.

May 17, 2019: Remembering I.M. Pei; The Bronx Gets A Bookstore To Call Its Own

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May 16, 2019: U.S. Birth Rate Hits Record Low; Broadway Plays Looks At The Clintons In 2008

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the U.S. birth rate reached its lowest in 32 years in 2018. Also, a new Broadway play — starring John Lithgow and Laurie Metcalf — takes an imaginative look at Hillary and Bill Clinton in New Hampshire before the 2008 primary. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 16, 2019 full broadcast.

May 16, 2019: U.S. Birth Rate Hits Record Low; Broadway Plays Looks At The Clintons In 2008

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May 15, 2019: FAA Faces Questions From Congress On 737 Max; Scientists Struggle For Green Workplaces

The acting head of the Federal Aviation Authority faces questions Wednesday from a House committee about the agency's role in approving the Boeing 737 Max airplane. Here & Now's transportation analyst Seth Kaplan talks about the FAA's safety assessments of the aircraft. Also, 53-year-old Victor Vescoso from Texas has resurfaced from what he claims is the deepest ocean dive in human history. He talks to host Jeremy Hobson about what he found at the bottom.

May 15, 2019: FAA Faces Questions From Congress On 737 Max; Scientists Struggle For Green Workplaces

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May 15, 2019: Alabama Senate Passes Abortion Bill; San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition Technology

As the country's most restrictive abortion bill goes to the Governor's desk in Alabama, NPR's Nina Totenberg and host Jeremy Hobson discuss the path this legislation could take to the Supreme Court. Also, San Francisco's board of supervisors voted to ban the use of facial recognition technology by city agencies and police. KQED's Rachael Myrow explains why. And, Birmingham, Al., was once the industrial hub for iron and steel, but is now a leader in attracting tech talent to the South.

May 15, 2019: Alabama Senate Passes Abortion Bill; San Francisco Bans Facial Recognition Technology

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May 14, 2019: Debate Over Breaking Up Tech Giants; Baby Boomers And 'The Theft Of A Decade'

Break up Facebook — that's the main takeaway from a recent New York Times piece by Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes. But there's a lot more to unpack beyond splitting up the social media giant. Also, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with author Joseph C. Sternberg about the new book "The Theft of a Decade: How the Baby Boomers Stole the Millennials' Economic Future." That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 14, 2019 full broadcast.

May 14, 2019: Debate Over Breaking Up Tech Giants; Baby Boomers And 'The Theft Of A Decade'

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May 14, 2019: U.S. And Iran Tensions Build; Dinosaur Fossils Found In Austin, Texas

Tensions have been ratcheting up between the U.S. and Iran. Last week, Iran's president threatened to walk away from some parts of the Iran nuclear deal — a deal that the U.S. has already left. Host Robin Young talks to James Stavridis, former Navy admiral and now operating executive at the Carlyle Group in Washington. Also, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with the British Ambassador to China, Dame Barbara Woodward, about increasing tensions between the U.S. and China over trade tariffs.

May 14, 2019: U.S. And Iran Tensions Build; Dinosaur Fossils Found In Austin, Texas

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May 13, 2019: China Puts New Tariffs On $60 Billion Of U.S. Goods; 'Game Of Thrones' Recap

President Trump raised tariffs on Chinese goods last week, and on Monday, the Chinese retaliated in kind. Here & Now's Robin Young gets the latest from NPR White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe. Also, scientists continue to be fascinated by squid, which are incredibly smart in more ways than you might think. We talk to Sarah McAnulty, a squid biologist and self-proclaimed "squid nerd," about all things cephalopods. And, HBO's "Game of Thrones" is speeding toward its series finale next Sunday.

May 13, 2019: China Puts New Tariffs On $60 Billion Of U.S. Goods; 'Game Of Thrones' Recap

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