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April 19, 2018: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's April 19, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota, who helped make a rules change allowing senators to bring their babies onto the Senate floor during votes. Also, Andrew Sean Greer's novel "Less" won this year's Pulitzer Prize for fiction. We revisit host Robin Young's conversation with Greer about the book from last July. And there have been protests in northern India this week over the rape and murder of an 8-year-old Muslim girl in January. Indian activist and former civil servant Aruna Roy was one of many who wrote a letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, calling his government's response "feeble and inadequate."

April 19, 2018: Hour 2

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April 19, 2018: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's April 19, 2018 full broadcast, we learn more about the U.S. Geological Survey releasing the results of a simulated 7.0 magnitude earthquake near Oakland: It predicts such a quake along the Hayward fault would kill up to 800 people and more than $100 billion in total damage. Also, Facebook has been under fire for weeks for its privacy practices and the way it monetizes user data. But there are many other companies tracking the data of unsuspecting users. And former Marine and author Phil Klay says a lack of clear mission, and a lack of debate about military missions in American society, are having deleterious effects on U.S. troop morale.

April 19, 2018: Hour 1

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April 18, 2018: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's April 18, 2018 full broadcast, chemical weapons inspectors still haven't entered Douma, where the U.S., U.K. and France say the Syrian government used poison gas to kill more than 40 people on April 7. We get the latest from a chemical weapons specialist. Also, a team of investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board has been sent to Philadelphia to figure out why an engine on a Southwest plane blew apart in midair Tuesday, shattering a window and nearly sucking a passenger outside. We hear more from a Wall Street Journal reporter. And, Larry Krasner won election as District Attorney in Philadelphia running on a platform of criminal justice reform and ending mass incarceration. We speak with Krasner about what he's accomplished in his first 100 days.

April 18, 2018: Hour 2

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April 18, 2018: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's April 18, 2018 full broadcast, following news that CIA Director Mike Pompeo made a secret trip to North Korea, we talk with retired Navy Adm. James Stavridis, dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and former supreme allied commander of NATO, about U.S.-North Korea talks and the likelihood of the North abandoning its nuclear weapons program. Also, we meet Scott Jurek, who broke the speed record for running the Appalachian Trail, navigating 2,189 miles — from Georgia to Maine — in 46 days, 8 hours and 7 minutes. And some baseball writers have called him "the Japanese Babe Ruth" and "the next big thing" in baseball: We learn more about Los Angeles Angels rookie sensation Shohei Ohtani.

April 18, 2018: Hour 1

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April 17, 2018: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's April 17, 2018 full broadcast, in an interview with NPR, former FBI Director James Comey said the FBI's reputation "would be worse today had we not picked the least bad alternatives." We speak with NPR's Steve Inskeep about that conversation. Also, at a deadly prison riot Sunday night in South Carolina, seven inmates were killed and 17 were injured. We get the latest. And, Gregory Pardlo won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 2015. In his new memoir, he explores his relationship with his father, an air traffic controller who was fired during the PATCO strike of 1981. He joins us to talk about the book.

April 17, 2018: Hour 1

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April 17, 2018: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's April 17, 2018 full broadcast, we speak with Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., about a bipartisan effort to replace the 2001 and 2002 authorizations for use of military force (AUMFs) with an updated AUMF. Also, Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports how music-induced hearing loss is a problem for classical musicians. And, Raúl Castro leaves office this week after two terms as president of Cuba. For the first time since 1959, Cuba will be run by someone other than a Castro. We get a view on life for Cubans after the Castros.

April 17, 2018: Hour 2

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April 16, 2018: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's April 16, 2018 full broadcast, a video that has garnered more than 9 million views on Twitter shows two black men being arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia. We get the latest from WHYY's Peter Crimmins. Also, with so much attention on North Korea and its nuclear weapons program, we may be overlooking some other nuclear issues in other countries, like China, Pakistan and Russia. We speak with one security analyst about nuclear proliferation around the world. And, despite driving rain and cooler-than-average temperatures, runners are competing in the 122nd Boston Marathon. Here & Now's Alex Ashlock reports from the finish line.

April 16, 2018: Hour 2

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April 16, 2018: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's April 16, 2018 full broadcast, we discuss the Sunday night James Comey interview on ABC, as well as the reaction in Washington, with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic. Also, classical music columnist Fran Hoepfner joins us to discuss Leonard Bernstein's second symphony, "The Age of Anxiety." And, as Wall Street looks to dip into the marijuana market, we speak with a partner of Green Table, a networking business that has been bringing together investors and pot entrepreneurs who are looking for funding.

April 16, 2018: Hour 1

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April 13, 2018: Hour 2

In hour two of Here & Now's April 13, 2018 full broadcast, we check in with NPR's Ryan Lucas, who has an advance copy of fired FBI Director James Comey's much-anticipated memoir. Also, "The Simpsons" has reigned on TV for nearly three decades, but a recent episode drew new attention to how the show handles racial stereotypes. And an ocean current that helps regulate the global climate system is slowing down. That's the conclusion of two new studies published in the journal Nature. Scientists disagree about what's behind the weaker ocean currents, but it could be bad news for the climate.

April 13, 2018: Hour 2

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April 13, 2018: Hour 1

In hour one of Here & Now's April 13, 2018 full broadcast, CNN White House correspondent Abby Phillip and NPR's lead politics editor Domenico Montanaro join us to review the week in politics. Also, Loren Zitomersky is hoping to break a world record at the Boston Marathon on Monday. But Kenyan Geoffrey Mutai, who ran it in just over two hours in 2011, has nothing to worry about. And remember last fall when the character Rich Uncle Pennybags from the board game Monopoly lit up social media after photo-bombing a Senate hearing on the Equifax data breach? Well, so-called Monopoly Man appeared again Thursday, complete with a monocle, top hat and bushy white mustache.

April 13, 2018: Hour 1

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