Here & Now Anytime The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.
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Here & Now Anytime

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The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

Most Recent Episodes

How should high schoolers navigate financial literacy?

Carnegie Endowment for International Peac's Dara Massicot joins us about long-term strategy in the war in Ukraine. And, Dr. Brett Davenport at the Fertility Institute of North Alabama explains how Alabama's ruling on embryos being regarded as people would impact in-vitro fertilization in the state. Then, high school seniors Aaron Ton and Jimmy Merino and Washington Post columnist Michelle Singletary discuss how high schoolers should be thinking about financial literacy.

How should high schoolers navigate financial literacy?

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What happens to families after an abortion denied

I. Glenn Cohen talks about the medical ethics questions raised by the Alabama Supreme Court's ruling that frozen embryos are people. And, American Society of Civil Engineers' Darren Olson explains the state of our water systems and how the Biden administration's new investment could help. Then, after the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Mayron Hollis was denied an abortion in Tennessee. ProPublica's Stacy Kranitz and Kavitha Surana share Hollis' story.

What happens to families after an abortion denied

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Native Americans built AZ's first irrigation canals. Now they're going solar

The Texas Newsroom's Julián Aguilar talks about a new military base underway in Texas along the border. And, the Gila River Indian Community is installing solar panels over an irrigation canal. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports on the project's impact. Then, RealClear Pennsylvania's Charles McElwee explains why some Latino voters in the state are leaning Republican this year.

Native Americans built AZ's first irrigation canals. Now they're going solar

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Principals weigh in on school cell phone policies

Russian-American journalist Masha Gessen discusses Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's legacy. And, Courthouse News' Erik Uebelacker recaps the civil corruption trial against the NRA and former CEO Wayne LaPierre. Then, two high school principals talk about their different approaches to cellphone policies in their schools.

Principals weigh in on school cell phone policies

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How Grateful Dead archivist David Lemieux finds gems in live shows

The Washington Post's Mary Ilyushina joins us to discuss the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. And, NPR's Ron Elving and NBC's Scott Wong talk about Vice President Kamala Harris' strong defense of NATO and condemnation of Russia. Then, archivist David Lemieux shares his experience listening to thousands of hours of live Grateful Dead shows searching for gems.

How Grateful Dead archivist David Lemieux finds gems in live shows

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Flight attendants strike: Union president on contract talks

The Washington Post's Arelis Hernandez explores why the number of migrant crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border dropped by 50% in January. And, Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, discusses contract negotiations after Alaska Airlines flight attendants voted to authorize a strike. Then, we reconnect with a Palestinian-American translator who got his family out of Gaza and into Cairo, Egypt. Plus, historian Wafa Ghnaim talks about tatreez, a traditional Palestinian embroidery art form.

Flight attendants strike: Union president on contract talks

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United CEO explains airline's plan to reach net-zero emissions by 2050

United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby talks about the airline's plan to be net-zero by 2050. And, Grist's Jake Bittle explores the environmental impact of liquefied natural gas. Then, WBUR's Andrea Shea reports on why Valentine's Day was about being sour and salty in the Victorian era. Plus, Berkley editorial director Cindy Hwang talks about trends in the romance novel genre.

United CEO explains airline's plan to reach net-zero emissions by 2050

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Israeli soldier's mother calls for ceasefire

NPR's Greg Myre joins us to talk about ceasefire negotiations and deteriorating conditions in Gaza. And, Michal Brody-Bareket talks about a group of Israeli mothers with sons fighting in the war who are calling for ceasefire. Then, author Gene Luen Yang and illustrator Leuyen Pham discuss their new graphic novel "Lunar New Year Love Story."

Israeli soldier's mother calls for ceasefire

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Meet BYD: The Chinese electric car company beating Tesla

Inside Election's Nathan Gonzales talks about former Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan's unexpected entry into the Senate race. And, automotive expert Tu Le talks about how Chinese electric vehicle manufacturer BYD has overtaken Tesla in sales of electric cars. Then, Zach Woods and Brandon Gardner talk about their new satire series "In the Know," which parodies NPR.

Meet BYD: The Chinese electric car company beating Tesla

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Super Bowl: Chiefs and 49ers will be on the TV. What will be on your table?

Fox News's Chad Pergram and Nevada Independent's Jon Ralston join us to talk about Trump's win in Nevada and the decision not to charge Biden with mishandling of documents. And, University of Baltimore professor Kim Wehle joins us to break down Supreme Court justices' skepticism over the case to ban former President Donald Trump from the Colorado ballot. Then, The Ringer's Lindsay Jones explains what's at stake for the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers on Super Bowl Sunday. Our resident chef Kathy Gunst also shares recipes for Super Bowl snack favorites including ribs and artichoke dip.

Super Bowl: Chiefs and 49ers will be on the TV. What will be on your table?

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