Here & Now Timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation from NPR & WBUR
Here & Now

Here & Now

From NPR

Timely, smart and in-depth news, interviews and conversation from NPR & WBUR

Most Recent Episodes

Cozy Up With These Top Books For Fall; Parents Of Toddler In Vaccine Trials

NPR Books' Petra Mayer shares a bunch of book recommendations with us. And, Pfizer-BioNTech announced that its COVID-19 vaccine for kids ages 5 to 11 is safe and effective. Yet even for parents excited about it, the shots can be daunting. Maggie and Pierce Sandwith's 2-year-old daughter Caroline got the Moderna vaccine, both to protect her and her 4-year-old sister Louise who is being treated for leukemia.

Cozy Up With These Top Books For Fall; Parents Of Toddler In Vaccine Trials

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Chancellor Angela Merkel's Legacy; Wedding Caterers Heat Things Up With Open Fires

Germans vote Sunday for a new parliament and government, and longtime Chancellor Angela Merkel plans to step down when a new government is formed. Loveday Morris, Berlin bureau chief at The Washington Post, explains Merkel's legacy. And, journalist Jon Kalish reports on a unique breed of caterers that cook on an open fire in front of the wedding guests.

Chancellor Angela Merkel's Legacy; Wedding Caterers Heat Things Up With Open Fires

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Why The 'Big Lie' Persists; Phoenix Schools Struggle With Bus Driver Shortage

False claims of rampant election fraud and a stolen 2020 presidential election persist despite the fact that there is no evidence that it's true. What gives these lies so much staying power? "Frankly, We Did Win This Election: The Inside Story of How Trump Lost" author Michael Bender joins us to explain. And, in Phoenix, Arizona, many school bus drivers are doubling or tripling up on routes. Brandon George, transportation director for PVUSD, talks about the shortage.

Why The 'Big Lie' Persists; Phoenix Schools Struggle With Bus Driver Shortage

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Long-Term COVID-19 Symptom Makes Food Taste, Smell Rotten; Wooly Mammoths Extinction

Parosmia, a long-term COVID-19 symptom, is a disorder that can make food smell and taste rancid. Patty Wight of Maine Public Radio reports on this perplexing condition that has a profound impact on people's lives but few treatment options. And, scientists thought that humans with stone weapons may have caused the disappearance of Ice Age beasts like wooly mammoths. But as Jeff St. Clair of WKSU reports, new research shows that stones were no match for mammoths' hair and hide.

Long-Term COVID-19 Symptom Makes Food Taste, Smell Rotten; Wooly Mammoths Extinction

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'The Facebook Files'; How Rural Afghanistan Views The Taliban Takeover

The Wall Street Journal's series "The Facebook Files" dives into a trove of internal documents from Facebook that reveal how much the company knows about what's wrong with its platform, and what — if anything — it's doing to fix it. Sam Schechner, senior tech reporter for the Wall Street Journal, tells us more. and safety from U.S. drone strikes and Afghan government raids. The Wall Street Journal's Yaroslav Trofimov talks about his conversations with rural Afghans.

'The Facebook Files'; How Rural Afghanistan Views The Taliban Takeover

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Moms Start Company To Employ Adults With Autism; Farmers Of Color Await Debt Relief

Pat Miller and Pam Kattouf met on the playground years ago and discovered that both of their kids had autism. The two New Jersey mothers later founded Beloved Bath so that their kids and others like them would have employment opportunities. And, farmers of color across the U.S. are still waiting on billions in debt relief from the Department of Agriculture, which allocated the funds back in March. Mekela Panditharatne, an attorney with Earth Justice, explains why the money hasn't been issued and its impact.

Moms Start Company To Employ Adults With Autism; Farmers Of Color Await Debt Relief

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Drones And Revolutionizing Farming; How Trees Impact Mental, Physical Health

Drone technology could be a new frontier for farmers looking to keep a watchful eye on the health of their crops. Connecticut Public Radio's Patrick Skahill reports. And, trees are beneficial to one's mental and physical health — but not everyone gets to enjoy those benefits equally. WBUR's Martha Bebinger reports on the disparity laid bare in one community near Boston.

Drones And Revolutionizing Farming; How Trees Impact Mental, Physical Health

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Why Haitians Come To The U.S.; Ventilation In The Workplace

Francesca Momplaisir, a native Haitian and author of the novel "My Mother's House" talks about what it's like for Haitians to flee their country. And, experts agree that proper ventilation can help prevent COVID-19 spread, but they also warn that not all the technologies available are useful, or even safe. So what should offices do? Harvard University's Joseph Allen talks about filters, ionizers, windows and more.

Why Haitians Come To The U.S.; Ventilation In The Workplace

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Rising Suicide Rate Among Black Girls; Backlash To Activist Reality TV Show

In 2018, researchers noted an increase in suicides among Black children over the last decade, but a new study shows that the biggest rise is among Black girls. Arielle Sheftall, lead author on the study, explains what's contributing to the increases and what can be done to stop it. And, CBS had a reality show in the works that would have put activists in competition against each other. After a swift backlash, its producers shifted format. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans weighs in on the controversy.

Rising Suicide Rate Among Black Girls; Backlash To Activist Reality TV Show

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The Many Benefits Of Trees; Remembering Comedian Norm Macdonald

Trees not only help slow the effects of climate change but also help clean and cool the air around them. WBUR's Martha Bebinger explains the many benefits of sugar maples. And, comedian and former Saturday Night Live cast member Norm Macdonald died this week after a long battle with cancer. Geoff Edgers, arts reporter for The Washington Post, profiles the comedian's career.

The Many Benefits Of Trees; Remembering Comedian Norm Macdonald

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