Piano Jazz Shorts A preview of upcoming conversations and improvisations with Marian McPartland and the brightest stars from the world of jazz.
Piano Jazz Shorts

Piano Jazz Shorts

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A preview of upcoming conversations and improvisations with Marian McPartland and the brightest stars from the world of jazz.More from Piano Jazz Shorts »

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Tony Bennertt, 1990

Ever-popular song stylist Tony Bennett was McPartland's guest for the first time in 1990. Bennett vocalizes American popular songs like nobody else can. When he was starting out, a voice teacher, Miriam Spier, famously told him: "Don't imitate singers, imitate musicians." So, Bennett decided to emulate Art Tatum. He also credits his relaxed delivery to the inspiration of Mildred Bailey. On this edition of Piano Jazz, Bennett sings "Stay as Sweet as You Are" and "Imagination." There's no need to guess who's playing the accompaniment.

Tony Bennertt, 1990

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Renee Rosnes,1990

Upon moving to New York from Vancouver, Canada, pianist and composer Renee Rosnes established a reputation as one of the premier jazz musicians on the scene. Over her 30-year career, Rosnes has collaborated with a diverse range of artists, from established masters such as Jack DeJohnette to younger giants such as Christian McBride and Melissa Aldana. On this 1990 episode of Piano Jazz, she plays Monk's "Four in One" then improvises with McPartland on her own tune "Fleur De Lis."

Renee Rosnes,1990

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Don Byron, 1999

Pulitzer Prize finalist and 2007 Guggenheim Fellow Don Byron is a prodigious multi-instrumentalist and composer. One of the most inventive and compelling musicians of his generation, he is credited for reviving interest in the jazz clarinet, his primary instrument. He has presented projects at major music festivals around the world and is known for playing in a wide variety of genres. In this 1999 Piano Jazz session, Byron demonstrates his flexibility and duets with McPartland on "Perdido," "Moon Indigo," and a creative free piece.

Don Byron, 1999

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Barbara Carroll, 1979

Pianist and vocalist Barbara Carroll (1925 – 2017) was described as a joyous and swinging jazz stylist. A dear friend of McPartland's, Carroll had a monumental career. When she was a guest on the program in 1979, she had just started her engagement at Bemelmans Bar in Manhattan, where she would perform for a remarkable 25 years. On this episode from the first season of Piano Jazz, she plays an original, "Barbara's Carol," and duets with McPartland on a timely rendition of Stevie Wonder's "Isn't She Lovely."

Barbara Carroll, 1979

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Andrew Hill, 2005

Pianist Andrew Hill (1931 – 2007) began playing jazz as a teenager in Chicago, where he was encouraged by Earl Hines. As he came of age, Hill played with jazz legends Miles Davis and Charlie Parker. He may be known best for his classic Blue Note recordings in the 1960s, which extended the possibilities of bop and hard bop through complex tunes. On this 2005 Piano Jazz, Hill demonstrates his mastery of melody, rhythm and technique on his own "Nicodemus" before joining host McPartland for "A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square."

Andrew Hill, 2005

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Marsha Ball, 1997

Pianist, vocalist, and songwriter Marcia Ball brings together Texas blues with Louisiana flavors, melding boogie-woogie, zydeco, and Swamp Rock. Influenced by artists of the region, such as Janis Joplin, Ball first came to the blues as a child by listening to Etta James and learned the piano through a mix of formal and informal lessons. On this 1997 Piano Jazz, Ball demonstrates her unique sound with "Crawfishin'" and her original "That's Enough of That." McPartland joins for a dual-piano rendition of "Woke Up Screaming."

Marsha Ball, 1997

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Geri Allen, 2008

One year ago this month, the music world lost Geri Allen, a highly regarded and influential pianist, composer, and educator. Allen (June 12, 1957 – June 27, 2017) died of cancer at age 60. A vital contributor to contemporary jazz, she was known for uniting disparate styles of jazz, and her style found its roots everywhere from Motown and James Brown to the music of Fats Waller and Thelonious Monk. In 2008, on her third appearance on Piano Jazz, Allen and McPartland perform a spontaneous composition. Allen solos on originals, including "Brilliant Veracity."

Geri Allen, 2008

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Roy Haynes, 1996

Roy Haynes is one of the greatest living jazz drummers of a generation, with a career spanning seven decades. In 2016 he joined Jon Batiste and Stay Human on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, performing at age 91. He was McPartland's guest for this 1996 Piano Jazz session. He reminisces with McPartland about the 1940s Chicago jazz scene and the 1950s Boston scene. Bassist Christian McBride joins them for Miles Davis' "So What," and Haynes solos on "Shades of Senegal."

Roy Haynes, 1996

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Ben Sidran, 1089

Ben Sidran is not only a nationally respected jazz composer, pianist, and song stylist, he is also a scholar, radio/TV producer, and jazz writer. When he was a guest on Piano Jazz in 1989, NPR listeners often heard his insightful commentary on All Things Considered as well as his own program Sidran on Record, which began in 1981. In this session Sidran duets with McPartland on "What Is This Thing Called Love?" and sings originals, including "Get to the Point" and "Mitsubishi Boy."

Ben Sidran, 1089

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Barbara Cook, 2018

This week Piano Jazz remembers Barbara Cook (1927 – August 8, 2017), the Tony and Grammy Award-winning lyric soprano who was a favorite of audiences around the world. She was a star on Broadway as an ingénue and became a staple of the New York cabaret scene in the later years of her prolific career. She was McPartland's guest in 1998. Joined by her longtime musical collaborator and accompanist Wally Harper, Cook delights host McPartland with her rendition of "It Might as Well Be Spring." McPartland returns the favor with her solo of "Plain and Fancy."

Barbara Cook, 2018

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