Planet Money The economy explained. Imagine you could call up a friend and say, "Meet me at the bar and tell me what's going on with the economy." Now imagine that's actually a fun evening.
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The economy explained. Imagine you could call up a friend and say, "Meet me at the bar and tell me what's going on with the economy." Now imagine that's actually a fun evening.

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Hire power

Noncompete agreements have become an integral part of job contracts. A show about what they are and how we got here. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Hire power

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ancient history/Flickr

How Do You Feel? (Classic)

We tend to think of economists as cold, unfeeling, attempting to be as rational as possible. But once a month, economists pick up the phone to just... check in with us. How are we feeling? Good, bad, worse than a year ago? It's a very specific phone call with very specific questions and a few years ago we looked into the origins of this very important survey that factors into economic decision making. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

How Do You Feel? (Classic)

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LIBOR pains

For decades, banks used one rate to help set all other rates: LIBOR. After it came out that it'd been rigged, regulators said: no more. Now it's a race — and a road trip — to find an alternative. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

LIBOR pains

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A beach in Belize, where we set up one of our shell companies (Photo by PEDRO PARDO/AFP via Getty Images) AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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We set up an offshore company in a tax haven (Classic)

The Pandora Papers released this week reveal how many world leaders allegedly hold wealth through the use of shell companies. We listen back to when we set up our very own Planet Money shell companies.

We set up an offshore company in a tax haven (Classic)

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The Rent Help Is Too Damn Slow

Congress created a massive pile of money to help people pay rent during the pandemic. Why have so few people gotten help? We follow the money. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

The Rent Help Is Too Damn Slow

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When The U.S. Paid Off The Entire National Debt (Classic)

There was one time the U.S. federal government stopped borrowing and paid off every penny of national debt. It did not end well. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

When The U.S. Paid Off The Entire National Debt (Classic)

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When Luddites Attack (Classic)

A couple centuries ago, a group of English clothworkers set out to destroy the machines that had been taking their jobs. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

When Luddites Attack (Classic)

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Original Sign

A request for dozens of stop signs flummoxes a town and angers a resident. A show about infrastructure, decision making and stop signs. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Original Sign

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Two Indicators: Women And Work

Women start a lot of businesses, but when it comes time for them to grow, many hit a wall, or the women founders end up losing control. Why? We bring you two indicators on women and work from our daily podcast The Indicator. Also, Amanda and Stacey go on a picnic to prove a point. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Two Indicators: Women And Work

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Workers count banknotes of various currencies at the headquarters of the Da Afghanistan Bank, Afghanistan's central bank, in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013. (Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Afghanistan's Money Problem

Afghanistan's economy changed — almost overnight — after the Taliban retook control of the country | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Afghanistan's Money Problem

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