Planet Money The economy explained. Imagine you could call up a friend and say, "Meet me at the bar and tell me what's going on with the economy." Now imagine that's actually a fun evening.
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Planet Money

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The economy explained. Imagine you could call up a friend and say, "Meet me at the bar and tell me what's going on with the economy." Now imagine that's actually a fun evening.

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Portraits of Studs Terkel. The Studs Terkel Radio Archive/WFMT hide caption

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The Studs Terkel Radio Archive/WFMT

Episode 939: The Working Tapes Of Studs Terkel

Hear what ordinary people told Studs Terkel about their jobs in the 70s — and what they have to say now. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Episode 939: The Working Tapes Of Studs Terkel

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Illmind's library of beats is sought after by artists from LL Cool J to Bruno Mars. @KofMotivation/Courtesy of Illmind hide caption

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@KofMotivation/Courtesy of Illmind

Episode 794: How To Make It In The Music Business

The hidden economy of producers buying and selling sonic snippets, texting each other beats, and angling for royalties. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Episode 794: How To Make It In The Music Business

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Post-WWII city ruins in Germany. Martin Badekow/Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Badekow/Underwood Archives/Getty Images

Episode 938: The Marshall Plan

Sometimes the way to help yourself is to help your enemy. After WWII, the U.S. launched what might be the most successful intervention in history, rebuilding Germany and also the rest of Western Europe. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Episode 938: The Marshall Plan

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The same mill in Massachusetts has been making U.S. dollar bills for over 130 years. Robert Benincasa/NPR hide caption

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Robert Benincasa/NPR

Episode 371: Where Dollar Bills Come From

Every dollar bill in the world comes from the same paper mill in Massachusetts. Today on the show, we get a front-row seat to the dollar-making process. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Episode 371: Where Dollar Bills Come From

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The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) headquarters in Washington, D.C. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Episode 937: Moving To Opportunity?

In the 90s, the government ran an experiment: What happens if we move people out of high-poverty neighborhoods and into low-poverty ones? Housing policy as hope? The results surprised them. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Episode 937: Moving To Opportunity?

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Mode, not average, is a better way to find the typical American. Pal Szilagyi Palko / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Pal Szilagyi Palko / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Episode 936: The Modal American

Kenny takes Jacob on a nerdy quest to find the "typical American." Naturally, it ends up harder⁠—and nerdier⁠—than we planned, and the answer is more subtle than we expected. | Subscribe to our newsletter here.

Episode 936: The Modal American

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Americans refrigerate their eggs. Europeans don't. There's a reason for this. Bill Hinton/Moment Editorial/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Hinton/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Episode 935: You Asked For A Food Show

The top producer of Top Chef helps us spice up this food edition of listener questions. How do you master the salad bar? Why do Americans refrigerate eggs? The story of Choco Pies and more. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Episode 935: You Asked For A Food Show

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The yield curve is inverted. Does that mean a recession is on the way? NPR hide caption

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NPR

Episode 934: Two Yield Curve Indicators

An inverted yield curve has predicted recessions for the past six decades. The curve is inverted right now. What does that tell us? | Subscribe to our newsletter here.

Episode 934: Two Yield Curve Indicators

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When hunting for helium, you need to drill deep down into the earth, well past the Jurassic period. These rocks are really old. Sarah Gonzalez hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez

Episode 933: Find The Helium

Helium is so special, and so rare, that the U.S. government once tried to buy it all up. And hide it. But the government's helium stockpile is running low. And we need it for MRI machines and NASA rockets.

Episode 933: Find The Helium

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Technicians install solar panels on a roof. This process has gotten a lot faster, and cheaper, over the years. AP hide caption

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AP

Episode 616: How Solar Got Cheap

For a long time, only rich people could afford to put solar panels on the roof. Not anymore. Here's what changed.

Episode 616: How Solar Got Cheap

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