James Brown and Don Cornelius take a break before an interview on Soul Train. Bruce W. Talamon hide caption

toggle caption
Bruce W. Talamon

'Soul Train' and the business of Black joy

When Soul Train first launched in 1970, Black audiences weren't understood as a viable target market. Don Cornelius changed that forever with his weekly TV dance show. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

'Soul Train' and the business of Black joy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1074784689/1074784841" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the lab with George Washington Carver, a prominent soil scientist and inventor of the early 20th Century. Bettmann Archive hide caption

toggle caption
Bettmann Archive

Patent racism (classic)

Economist Lisa Cook has been nominated to serve on the Federal Reserve board. In 2020, she talked to us about proving that racism stifles innovation. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Patent racism (classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1074167628/1074181066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Molly Messick

The rapid testing show

The Planet Money team fans out across the nation with one goal: to get a Covid test in 24 hours. It is easier said than done. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

The rapid testing show

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1073227859/1073281489" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Woody action figure lays in a pile of returned goods that are resold at Treasure Hunt Bin Megastore. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi hide caption

toggle caption
Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi

No such thing as a free return

Lenient policies have shoppers making more returns than ever — around half a trillion dollars worth of products. Today, we find out the fate of some of those returned goods.

No such thing as a free return

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1072447059/1072553383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Art by George Butler George Butler hide caption

toggle caption
George Butler

HBO 2.0

What happens when the iconic symbol of your brand no longer makes sense? Today, HBO tries to evolve their sonic brand. This episode was adapted from the podcast Twenty Thousand Hertz. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

HBO 2.0

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1071399505/1071457896" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An update of our favorite stories NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

The Rest of the Story, 2021

On protests, pasta and forgiven payments. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

The Rest of the Story, 2021

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1063191243/1070658014" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Invision for Werther's Original via AP

The holiday industrial complex (Classic)

Where do holidays like National Potato Chip Day and Argyle Day come from? We trace the roots of one made-up holiday until we find out who is running the global holiday machine. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

The holiday industrial complex (Classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1069136987/1069255914" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images) Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

The economic indicator of the year

Will it be inflation? Striketober? The supply chain? Our hosts make their case, and the choice is up to you.

The economic indicator of the year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1068766749/1068948528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Malmark handbells on the left and Schulmerich bells on the right. malmark.com/schulmerichbells.com hide caption

toggle caption
malmark.com/schulmerichbells.com

Bell wars (Classic)

The two biggest handbell companies in the world have been locked in a feud for decades. Why? | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Bell wars (Classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1067333584/1067616670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Rose Wong for NPR

Planet Money's Supply Chain Holiday Extravaganza

Planet Money's Supply Chain Holiday Extravaganza Did the supply chain wreck your holiday shopping? Planet Money comes to the rescue. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Planet Money's Supply Chain Holiday Extravaganza

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1063733799/1067158188" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
AP

No shortage of labor stories

We asked for your dispatches from the labor market, and boy did we hear back. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

No shortage of labor stories

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1065332194/1065369735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nick Fountain hawks a Frasier Fir in Brooklyn. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

We buy a lot of Christmas trees (Classic)

Nick and Robert head to the world's largest Christmas tree auction with $1,000 and a truck. And get schooled in the tree market. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

We buy a lot of Christmas trees (Classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1061041822/1064631328" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Getty Images

Two music indicators

Ticket scalping frustrates fans, but it fascinates economists. It's been a favorite topic of ours in the past. This time, Darian turns to friends and experts to navigate the world of concert tickets like an economist who is also a music fan. Then we find out just how big Adele is on vinyl. So big her latest album disrupted the whole market for vinyl, the material itself. | These stories come from our daily podcast The Indicator. Go subscribe if you haven't already.

Two music indicators

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1062790386/1063201390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Stradivarius instruments can sell for many millions of dollars. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Is a Stradivarius just a violin? (Classic)

Many music aficionados will tell you that violins and violas made by legendary craftsman Antonio Stradivari represent the pinnacle of the instruments. But what if it's all just an example of really good branding? | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Is a Stradivarius just a violin? (Classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1062437207/1062522739" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Photo of lobster caught in the Canadian province, Nova Scotia. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Consider the lobstermen

A tense conflict between Indigenous fishermen and commercial lobstermen flared up in Nova Scotia in the fall of 2020. Today, how it all got started and how the Canadian government added fuel to the fire. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Consider the lobstermen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1061289894/1061438694" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

J.P. Morgan Flickr/The Library of Congress hide caption

toggle caption
Flickr/The Library of Congress

A locked door, a secret meeting and the birth of the Fed (Classic)

The story of the back-room dealings that created America's central bank. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

A locked door, a secret meeting and the birth of the Fed (Classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1060610393/1060653458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Planet Money's Treasury Bill Kenny Malone hide caption

toggle caption
Kenny Malone

Day of the debt

We make a loan to the U.S. government, and it does not go the way we thought it would. Plus: the story of that one time the U.S. defaulted. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Day of the debt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1058529788/1059097354" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(Photo credit should read ANDY BUCHANAN/AFP via Getty Images) AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

You asked for real raises, free shipping, and a special delivery

It's listener question time. We've got answers about "free" shipping, full employment, when a raise isn't a raise, Taylor Swift, crypto seizures and our very own Micro-Face comic. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

You asked for real raises, free shipping, and a special delivery

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1058039161/1059140324" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Truffles on a scale The Sporkful hide caption

toggle caption
The Sporkful

A trunk full of truffles (Update)

Truffles are one of the most expensive and sought after ingredients in the world. Today, we look back at our NYC adventure with a truffle smuggler and how the market has changed since we last talked to him. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

A trunk full of truffles (Update)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1057292186/1057453710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Photo of Chassis at the Port of Hueneme. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Of boats and boxes

We take a trip to ports on the east and west coasts to ask what's on everyone's mind: why are they so clogged? And how can we fix it? | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Of boats and boxes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056299014/1056631387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Cat 345C L Excavator, aka a big digging machine NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Auction fever (Classic)

Today, we go on a Planet Money roadtrip to learn the secrets of the auction world. We find some amazing bargains, some shady strategies and a giant big digger. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Auction fever (Classic)

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1055421103/1055423700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Photo of the Brent Spence Bridge connecting Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. (Photo by JEFF DEAN/AFP via Getty Images) AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

Planes, trains and bad bridges

The $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill has passed Congress, but what exactly is in it? Today, the important, surprising, delightful line items. | Subscribe to our weekly newsletter here.

Planes, trains and bad bridges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1054402540/1054560055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Photo of Dr. Robert Kadlec in front of the whiteboard where he wrote "Manhattan Project." https://www.thefirstshots.com/ hide caption

toggle caption
https://www.thefirstshots.com/

Moonshot in the arm

COVID-19 prompted the quickest vaccine development in history. An inside look at how the government and pharmaceutical companies joined forces to make it happen.

Moonshot in the arm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1053003777/1053067746" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Courtesy of U.S. Wheat Associates U.S. Wheat Associates hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Wheat Associates

The Wheat Whisperer

Southeast Asia is one of the biggest growth markets for American wheat. Where did this taste for wheat come from and who is responsible?

The Wheat Whisperer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1052131196/1052160839" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript