Graciela Iturbide's Mujer Ángel (Angel Woman), from 1979, was taken in the Sonoran Desert. Graciela Iturbide/Museum of Women in the Arts hide caption

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Graciela Iturbide/Museum of Women in the Arts

Graciela Iturbide, The Artistic Soul Of Mexico

Take a journey into the artistic sensibilities of a genuine photographic icon. This interview was conducted entirely in Spanish.

Graciela Iturbide, The Artistic Soul Of Mexico

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Devendra Banhart is one of two artists featured on this week's episode. Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lauren Dukoff/Courtesy of the artist

Roots Grow Outward

Devendra Banhart and John Santos both have cultural roots in Latin America, but their music could not be more different. Hear two separate interviews with these enigmatic musicians

Roots Grow Outward

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The Texicana Mamas (left to right): Tish Hinojosa, Stephanie Urbina Jones, Patricia Vonne. The trio's self-titled debut album is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

The trio of powerful Latina vocalists is at home in mariachi, country, Americana and folk music.

The Texicana Mamas Celebrate Tejana Culture With Wondrous Harmony

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Vocalist Gloria Estefan reimagines some of her classic music through a Brazilian lens. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Gloria Estefan: 'It's All About The Drums,' This Time From Brazil

The Cuban-American pop star indulges her love of Brazilian music and rhythms on her new album.

Gloria Estefan: 'It's All About The Drums,' This Time From Brazil

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LADAMA is (left to right) Sara Lucas, Mafer Bandola, Daniela Serna and Lara Klaus. Their new album is called Oye Mujer. Yanin May/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Yanin May/Courtesy of the artist

Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music

With members spread over four countries, LADAMA elegantly blends cultures and ideas. Its new album is called Oye Mujer.

Listen To The Lessons In LADAMA's Music

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Carlos Vives leans into his Colombian roots on his latest album, Cumbiana. Andres Oyuela/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Andres Oyuela/Courtesy of the artist

Alt.Latino's Summer Music Haul

From Carlos Vives to Ana Tijoux, here's a batch of new music that meditates on identity, culture and the pandemic.

Alt.Latino's Summer Music Haul

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Pete Rodriguez (center) on the cover of 1967's I Like It Like That, a pivotal boogaloo record, which has just been reissued. Courtesy of Craft Latino hide caption

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Courtesy of Craft Latino

Reclaiming Boogaloo

The very essence of boogaloo music is about "bringing people together, creating conversation and creating community." How was it appropriated by white supremacists?

Reclaiming Boogaloo

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Residente (right) and Bad Bunny call for Puerto Rican governor Ricardo Rossello's resignation in San Juan on July 17, 2019. Eric Rojas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Rojas/AFP/Getty Images

Residente's Favorite Protest Songs

One half of the Grammy-winning group Calle 13, Residente has written his share of powerful protest songs. This week he shares his favorites by other artists.

Residente's Favorite Protest Songs

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In Tijuana, raised fists show solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images

The Afro-Latinx Experience Is Essential To Our International Reckoning On Race

"Blackness is heterogeneous." On this week's episode, deep conversations about the Afro Latinidad and Blackness.

The Afro-Latinx Experience Is Essential To Our International Reckoning On Race

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Colombian vocalist Lido Pimienta released one of our favorite albums of the year so far. Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Daniella Murillo/Courtesy of the Artist

Alt.Latino's Favorites Of The Year (So Far) Reflect Our Times

Our annual mid-year survey contains music that speaks to the current health crisis, as well as the fight for racial equality.

Alt. Latino Reflects On The Best Music Of 2020 (So Far)

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Colombian musician Juanes turns inward in music and conversation on this week's show. Omar Cruz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Omar Cruz/Courtesy of the artist

Juanes Turns Inward

Juanes reflects on lessons learned from the world-wide pandemic, how Latin music has changed in the last ten years and his love of Metallica and Bruce Springsteen.

Juanes Turns Inward

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"I have found metal to be very descriptive of the horrors that we've lived in the Dominican Republic under dictatorships, [slavery]," Rita Indiana says. "Our history is a horrorosa." Noelie Quintero/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Noelie Quintero/Courtesy of the artist

Rita Indiana, La Monstra, Returns With 'Black Sabbath Dembow'

"Music is more democratic than literature." Ten years after releasing her debut album, the Dominican musician and novelist returns with Mandinga Times.

Rita Indiana, La Monstra, Returns With 'Black Sabbath Dembow'

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Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd on assignment for Alt.Latino in Bogota, Colombia. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Alt.Latino's 10th Anniversary!

Over the past decade, Alt.Latino has covered immigration, LGBTQ concerns, fights for social justice and, of course, music. Looking back this week, we revisit our very first episode and pilot.

Alt.Latino's 10th Anniversary!

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Lila Downs and Gina Chavez join this week's Alt.Latino to talk about new music, but also the world right now. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

Lila Downs And Gina Chavez: Two Mujeres With Messages

These conversations with Lila Downs and Gina Chavez explore identity, the power of language and listening to our ancestors for guidance.

Lila Downs And Gina Chavez: Two Mujeres With Messages

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George Floyd's death by police force has sparked world-wide protest. Alt.Latino digs into it archives for an episode about protest music and its power. Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Ira L. Black/Corbis via Getty Images

From The Alt.Latino Archives: Protest Music That Inspires And Moves

Music gives voice to frustration and anger. On this episode, we listen to musicians demand social justice in song and action.

From The Alt.Latino Archives: Protest Music That Inspires And Moves

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Natalia Lafourcade celebrates Mexican son jarocho on her new album, Un Canto Para Mexico. Manuel Zuñiga/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Manuel Zuñiga/Courtesy of the artist

Natalia Lafourcade Searches For The Soul Of Son Jarocho

The Mexican folk music of Veracruz is a pathway not just to her own cultural and familial roots, Natalia Lafourcade says, but also offers a balm for these times.

Natalia Lafourcade Searches For The Soul Of Son Jarocho

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Undocumented workers are fighting for personal protection equipment as they perform work categorized as "essential" by the federal government. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community

This week, we host a roundtable with reporters covering the coronavirus and how infections have adversely impacted communities of color in the U.S.

The Pandemic's Impact On The Latino Community

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Davíd Garza, the co-producer of Fiona Apple's Fetch the Bolt Cutters, talks about the economic challenges of the pandemic with a panel of guests. Felix Contreras/NPR hide caption

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Felix Contreras/NPR

How Some Indie Musicians Innovate And Improvise During Coronavirus

From a virtual songwriting camp to studio session work, we check back with Davíd Garza, Rocio Marron and Making Movies' Enrique Chi about what they're doing to generate some income during quarantine.

How Some Indie Musicians Innovate And Improvise During Coronavirus

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Guatemala's Kathy Palma is one of the artists featured n this week's show. Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the Artist

New Music For Being In And Out And About

Hit play on new songs from Chicano Batman, Lido Pimienta and Helado Negro for your indoor and socially-distanced outdoor activities.

New Music For Being In And Out And About

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Cuban percussionist Cándido Camero turned 99 years young this month. Tom Pich/National Endowment for the Arts hide caption

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Tom Pich/National Endowment for the Arts

Cándido Camero, Latin Jazz Pioneer, Turns 99

Hear an interview with the great Cuban percussionist as he remembers Havana nightlife in the 1940s and the pulsing streets of New York just after World War II.

Cándido Camero, Latin Jazz Pioneer, Turns 99

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Vocalist Jorge Drexler is one of the artists that Alt.Latino listeners turn to for comfort. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Listener Picks: Songs Of Hope And Calm

If there was ever a need for the healing power of music, now is that time. We put out a call for the songs helping you cope and, on this episode, we play your picks.

Listener Picks: Songs Of Hope And Calm

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Alt.Latino's video chat with musicians affected by the coronavirus crisis. Top row, left to right: host Felix Contreras, Enrique Chi. Bottom row, left to right: Davíd Garza, Rocio Marron. Courtesy of Enrique Chi hide caption

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Courtesy of Enrique Chi

Indie Musicians On The Economic And Emotional Impact Of Coronavirus

Davíd Garza, Making Movies' Enrique Chi and Rocio Marron share the struggle of being a working musician during this time.

Indie Musicians On The Economic And Emotional Impact Of Coronavirus

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Angelica Garcia is just one of the many artists we'll miss seeing at SXSW this year. Caitlyn Krone/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Caitlyn Krone/Courtesy of the artist

The Bands We Wanted To See At SXSW 2020

In the wake of the cancellation of SXSW this year, Alt.Latino explores the bands we had wanted to see this year in Austin, Texas.

The Bands We Wanted To See At SXSW 2020

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Cuban pianist Omar Sosa plays meditative music perfect for our times Courtesy of the Artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the Artist

Calma: A Meditative Playlist For A Challenging Time

We use the music of pianist Omar Sosa this week to calm our anxieties and fears during an uncertain time.

Calma: A Meditative Playlist For A Challenging Time

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