Bullseye with Jesse Thorn Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)
Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

From NPR

Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

Most Recent Episodes

Rosie Perez

Rosie Perez is one of the most fascinating people we've had on Bullseye. A native of Bushwick, Brooklyn, she's performed on stage and screen. She was nominated for an Academy Award for her role in 1993's Fearless, had iconic parts in White Men Can't Jump and Do The Right Thing. She's been a host on ABC's The View, served as Grand Marshal for the International Boxing Hall of Fame and as if all of that weren't enough, she was a powerhouse choreographer for In Living Color and is responsible for helping to bring hip hop to the living rooms of middle America. We talked to Rosie about her difficult childhood, surviving past trauma and why she'll always have a soft spot for the suburbs. Plus, she'll tell us why she prefers the New York hustle and bustle over sunny Los Angeles. Rosie speaks with us from the heart and we're so happy to have her on the show.

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Sean Hayes and Megan Mullally once again play Jack McFarland and Karen Walker in NBC's Will and Grace. Chris Haston/NBC hide caption

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Chris Haston/NBC

Will and Grace's Megan Mullally

Megan Mullally is a comedy legend known for playing eccentric characters. She got her big break playing perhaps her most over-the-top persona, the martini-toting socialite Karen Walker on the groundbreaking show Will and Grace. Mullally won an Emmy for this role in 2006. On Bullseye she talks to us about how she developed her character Karen, her not-so usual upbringing, and oddly enough, how it was to win an Emmy Idol with Donald Trump.

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NEW YORK, NEW YORK - SEPTEMBER 27: Forest Whitaker attends the Whitaker Peace & Development Initiative (WPDI) "Place for Peace" at Gotham Hall on September 27, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Whitaker Peace & Development Initiative) Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Whitaker Peace hide caption

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Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images for Whitaker Peace

Forest Whitaker

Forest Whitaker has got this knack for taking huge figures from history and portraying them as complex, fascinating, sometimes really fragile people. You've seen him as the star of countless great movies for over thirty years now. He has won plenty of awards including an Academy Award for best actor for his role as Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland. When we spoke last year, he portrayed Archbishop Desmond Tutu in the film The Forgiven. Forest chats with Jesse about getting to know Archbishop Tutu as a character and a friend over the years. Plus, hot takes on box-office flop Battlefield Earth! This interview originally aired in March of 2018

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Antonio Banderas won the best actor award at the 2019 Cannes Film Festival for his performance in Pedro Almodóvar's new film, Pain and Glory. Manolo Pavón/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics hide caption

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Manolo Pavón/Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

Antonio Banderas

Antonio Banderas joins us to talk about his latest project with Pedro Almodóvar — Pain and Glory, a touching and beautiful confessional about living with chronic pain. Banderas plays a director who much like Almodóvar is crippled by his maladies. The film debuted at Cannes Film Festival where Banderas won the award for Best Actor. Banderas talks to Bullseye about his childhood in Spain, connecting with people through pain and reuniting with Almodóvar. Plus, we find out how he learned the lines to Mambo Kings, before he became fluent in English.

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Thomas (Willem Dafoe) and Ephraim (Robert Pattinson) keep a crusty vigil in Robert Eggers' The Lighthouse. TIFF hide caption

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TIFF

"The Lighthouse" Director Robert Eggers

Robert Eggers is a filmmaker who's made a name for himself making beautiful horror films that linger with you. Long after you've left the theater. His 2015 film The Witch premiered at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival to near-universal acclaim. His latest film, "The Lighthouse" stars Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson as 19th century sailors. The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and has since received rave reviews. Eggers talks to Bullseye about the joys of research down to the finest historical detail, about the uniqueness of the New England landscape and provoking questions in his films. Plus, we find out what scares him the most.

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Soprano Renée Fleming

Known as "America's Diva," Renée Fleming has performed in venues all over the world, singing in acclaimed productions of operas composed by Mozart, Puccini, Verdi, Dvorak and more. She's tackled the world of opera, jazz, country and just about every other music genre. Lately, she's been working on stage in musicals. Her latest, "The Light in the Piazza" just wrapped up in Los Angeles, with productions in Chicago and Sydney on the horizon. Renée talks to Bullseye about managing acoustics, growing up in a musical home and not only cultivating her talent but her image, too. We talk to her about the mental preparation that goes into singing the National Anthem while 50 million people watch from home as Black Hawk helicopters fly overhead.

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Mindy Tucker/Shark Party Media

Comedian Josh Gondelman

We're joined by comedian and admitted "Nice Guy" Josh Gondelman. Josh is a Peabody and Emmy award winning writer for his work on Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. He's currently senior staff writer and producer for Showtime's popular new show Desus & Mero. His new book, Nice Try: Stories of Best Intentions and Mixed Results is a collection of personal essays about the value and drawbacks of being a nice person. Its self-deprecating. It's honest. It's very very funny. Josh Gondelman joins us to talk about his stand-up career. He'll chat about realizing the difference between being a nice person and being a good person, tweeting out millennial Seinfeld references and crafting the perfect roast joke. Plus, we'll talk about intent versus impact in the world of comedy.

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Tony Gonzalez at the Maximum Fun studios in Los Angeles, CA. Jesse Thorn/Maximum Fun hide caption

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Jesse Thorn/Maximum Fun

NFL Hall of Famer Tony Gonzalez

He's one of the greatest tight ends in history, but it wasn't always easy. Growing up, Tony Gonzalez was bullied constantly. His first year in the NFL was so tough he almost called it quits. And throughout his career, he never really felt like he could stand up and address his whole team. He's very open about his struggles and sacrifices. Tony's got a new podcast where he invites people in business and entertainment to talk about the often difficult journey to success. It's called Wide Open. It's a show about becoming the best version of yourself – what he calls "leveling up." We'll talk about his new podcast, wretched middle school days, and he'll open up about his time in the NFL.

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AUSTIN, TEXAS - MARCH 11: Chris Morris attends the "The Day Shall Come" Premiere 2019 SXSW Conference and Festivals at Paramount Theatre on March 11, 2019 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for SXSW) Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for SXSW

Satirist and director Chris Morris on "The Day Shall Come"

Lately, Chris Morris has been basing a lot of his absurdist comedy on real life world events. His new film, The Day Shall Come, is kind of a farce about terrorism and the FBI's efforts to fight it. The film tells a complex and often bizarre story that is almost entirely based on real things that happened in the counter terrorism world. Chris Morris joins us to talk about his new movie. He'll chat about reading court transcripts, talking with journalists, even attending trials to really understand what goes on at the Bureau. Plus, we'll talk about his other brilliant works of satire The Day Today and Brass Eye.

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The Righteous Gemstones' Edi Patterson

Edi Petterson is an actress and comedian. She's a veteran of the Groundlings sketch group and we can not stress this to you enough: she is super funny. She currently co stars alongside Danny McBride, John Goodman, Walton Goggins and Adam Devine on HBO's The Righteous Gemstones where she plays the hilarious Judy Gemstone. We talked to Edi about losing herself in improv, playing John Goodman's daughter and her experience with megachurches. Plus, she talks to us about being introduced to horror films at an early age. Maybe too early? Don't miss this episode!

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