Bullseye with Jesse Thorn Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)
Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

From NPR

Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

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When The Tick (Peter Serafinowicz) attaches himself to Arthur (Griffin Newman), no tweezers in the world can separate them. Jessica Miglio/Amazon hide caption

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Jessica Miglio/Amazon

Cartoonist Ben Edlund on The Tick's legacy

The Tick is one of the strangest, most compelling superheroes ever. Creator Ben Edlund has lived with the character for over 30 years now. The Tick has been a comic book series, an animated TV show, a video game, and a live action TV show. Now, The Tick is back with another live-action TV show on Amazon. The Tick is kind of this giant man in a blue suit with antennas on his head. He's got all the classic trappings of a superhero: strength, speed, invincibility. But he's also kind of a dope. Edlund joins us to discuss how his relationship with the character has changed over three decades. Plus, why he feels the latest revival nails the strange, odd tone in ways the other projects haven't. Writing compelling and grounded superhero stories is hard to pull off in a post-Dark Night world ... if you haven't met The Tick by now you're in for a treat!

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Paula Pell Jesse Thorn/Maximum Fun hide caption

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Jesse Thorn/Maximum Fun

Paula Pell on Saturday Night Live, Wine Country and more

So many of the sketches Paula Pell has written for Saturday Night Live are stone-cold classics. There's the Culps, Ana Gasteyer and Will Ferrell's bizarre pop music duo. The Spartan Cheerleaders. The Tony Bennett Show. Remember when Justin Timberlake brought us on down to Omeletteville? We have Paula Pell to thank for a lot of wonderful and hilarious work on SNL. Paula pulls back the curtain and discusses some of her more controversial work on the classic program. Pell also joins us to talk about her latest project: Wine Country. She co-stars alongside SNL alums Amy Poehler, Maya Rudolph, Tina Fey, and Rachel Dratch. Sincerely, one of the funniest people we've ever had on the show. Don't sleep on this one!

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LOS ANGELES, CA - APRIL 05: Musician David Crosby performs onstage at the 2nd Light Up The Blues Concert - An Evening Of Music To Benefit Autism Speaks at The Theatre At Ace Hotel on April 5, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images for LUTB) Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images hide caption

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Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images

David Crosby

Bullseye takes a look back at our conversation with folk rock legend David Crosby. His work paved the way for the folk rock movement. He was a founding member of The Byrds and performed at Woodstock as a member of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. With a career that has spawned over 50 years and two inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, David is a living legend. David is the subject of a new documentary called David Crosby: Remember My Name which premiered at Sundance. Then, Jesse talks about the eclectic stylings of Ray Barretto's album Acid.

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Jesse Thorn

Wanda Sykes

This week, a favorite from the archives: Jesse's conversation with world-class comedian Wanda Sykes. She's a legend in the comedy world and her ability to tackle pop culture and the political spectrum with equal agility has earned her many accolades. She's also had many scene-stealing roles as an actor in shows like Black-ish, Broad City and Curb Your Enthusiasm. She's been nominated for nine Emmy awards and she won one for her writing on The Chris Rock Show. We just got word that Wanda will be starring in a special 90 minute live performance of "All in The Family," the groundbreaking Norman Lear sitcom. It airs later this month on ABC - she'll be playing Louise Jefferson.

Wanda Sykes

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Mark Alan Stamaty give us the scoop on his new anthology collection and how his childhood influenced his work. Third Party hide caption

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Third Party

Cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty

We're thrilled to share our conversation with cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty. We're huge fans of his children's book – "Who Needs Donuts?" Mark's wonderfully illustrated book tells the story of a kid in a cowboy suit who's bored with his family. He hitches up his wagon and heads out for the big city in search of donuts. After a wild adventure he realizes there are things far greater than donuts. It's a charming and hilarious book for kids. And, trust us, adults will love it, too! Mark Alan Stamaty gives us the scoop on his new anthology collection and how his childhood influenced his work. Plus, where he gets the silly ideas for his stories and illustrations like rhinos on the subway wearing fancy hats or shark-shaped cars!

Cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty

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NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 02: Actor Mike O'Brien attends the 2013 Adweek Hot List gala at Capitale on December 2, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Ben Gabbe/Getty Images) Ben Gabbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Gabbe/Getty Images

A.P. Bio creator Mike O'Brien

Have you seen "A.P. Bio?" It's one of the funniest network sitcoms out these days and its latest second season is going strong on NBC. The show tells the story of a disgraced Harvard Philosophy professor (played by Glenn Howerton of "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia") who finds himself teaching Advanced Placement Biology at a high school in his hometown of Toledo, Ohio. Mike O'Brien created the show, and he joins Jesse to talk about the show's new season. Plus: his own childhood in Toledo, and explains some of the baffling questions the writers room had about his hometown. Like, truly baffling.

A.P. Bio creator Mike O'Brien

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Open Mike Eagle

This week: the great Open Mike Eagle! He's a rapper and TV host: Alongside Baron Vaughn, Mike co-stars in a new Comedy Central show called "The New Negroes". It's sort of a variety show - combining live stand up with original music videos Mike made with other artists. When Bullseye talked to Mike in 2017, he'd just released a record called "Brick Body Kids Still Daydream." His latest album - "What Happens When I Try to Relax" - is out now.

Open Mike Eagle

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Laurie Metcalf

Jesse talks with one of the greats: Laurie Metcalf. You definitely know Laurie from from Roseanne. For 9 years she played Jackie, on the hit TV show. She's now starring in The Conners, the new Spinoff. She's also an Academy Award nominee for her work alongside Saoirse Ronan in Lady Bird, the fascinating, beautiful coming of age film directed by Greta Gerwig. These days, Laurie's been working a lot on Broadway. She's been nominated for a bunch of Tony's and won 2017's Best Actress award for her role in A Doll's House part II.

Laurie Metcalf

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Was 1999 the Best Movie Year Ever?

Brian Raftery writes for GQ, Wired and Rolling Stone, among others. He just wrote a really interesting book. He called it "Best Movie Year Ever" and in the book's 300 pages, Brian makes the case that one of the most interesting and memorable years in cinema history... was 1999. The year that saw the release of Office Space. Rushmore. Three Kings. Being John Malkovich... you get the point. It's a great read, tons of interviews and insight into a year that not just saw a bunch of classic movies but changed the way studios marketed them. Listen to this one for a fascinating conversation about film!

Was 1999 the Best Movie Year Ever?

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Avantdale Bowling Club

What follows is one of our favorite interviews we've recorded this year. Seriously. It's with an artist you probably haven't heard of. His name's Tom Scott. He's from New Zealand. He's been a rapper there for about 10 years now, he's one of the biggest role players in the small, burgeoning scene there. Last year he created the group Avantdale Bowling Club and released a self-titled record for the group. It combines jazz with hip-hop in the same way Kendrick Lamar's To Pimp a Butterfly did. It's lush and beautiful like Pharoah Sanders or Alice Coltrane. Tom's rhymes are deeply personal and affecting and honest. It's one of our favorite albums of the year. Don't miss this one!

Avantdale Bowling Club

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