Bullseye with Jesse Thorn Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)
Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

From NPR

Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

Most Recent Episodes

Ben Lindbergh and Travis Sawchik, authors of 'The MVP Machine'

It's baseball week here at Bullseye and best-selling authors Ben Lindbergh and Travis Sawchik are stepping up to the plate. They're the writers behind the book, The MVP Machine: How Baseball's New Nonconformists Are Using Data to Build Better Players. The book looks at how previously cast aside players are transforming themselves into All-Stars. And, they'll talk to us about how players aren't the only ones changing the game. And even if you're not into baseball, we promise there are some lessons to take away!

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Chuck Klosterman

Chuck Klosterman has written tomes of the written word for GQ, ESPN, The Washington Post, Esquire, The Guardian, and plenty more. In 2014, he joined us to talk about I Wear the Black Hat, which examined villainy through pop culture figures like Batman, Kanye West and LeBron James. In 2016, he talked about his book: But What if We're Wrong, which examined how the present will be perceived in the future. But this time around, Chuck joins us to tell us about the craziest day of his career. Trust us, this is one story you don't want to miss! Klosterman's latest book Raised in Captivity: Fictional Nonfiction is out now.

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Journalist and author Jeff Chang Jeremy Keith Villaluz hide caption

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Jeremy Keith Villaluz

Author and journalist Jeff Chang

Jeff Chang is a journalist and music critic with an emphasis on hip-hop music and culture. His work has appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, the Village Voice, the San Francisco Bay Guardian, Spin, and many more. Jeff Chang returns to Bullseye to talk about his latest project, "We Gon' Be Alright." It was originally a book released back in 2016. Recently, it was turned into a web series by Indie Lens Spotlight. The series deals with some really tough questions about race in America with no easy answer, the current state of racism since Trump became President, where Asian-Americans fall when it comes to discrimination. It's a look at the state of race relations in America today. And, what he'd like to see people do about it.

Author and journalist Jeff Chang

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BEVERLY HILLS, CA - JULY 29: Actor JB Smoove speaks onstage during "The Millers" panel discussion at the CBS, Showtime and The CW portion of the 2013 Summer Television Critics Association tour at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on July 29, 2013 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images) Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Comic and actor J.B. Smoove

*A heads up to listeners, this episode contains many censored expletives throughout the interview.* J.B. Smoove is without a doubt one of the funniest people we've ever had on Bullseye. He got his start in television as one of the stars of Def Comedy Jam in the mid-90's. In the early aughts, he became a writer on Saturday Night Live. But, he's probably best known for his role as Leon on Curb Your Enthusiasm. J.B. joins us to talk about his time on SNL. We'll hear about a few of his favorite sketches that never made it to air. He'll also talk about his work on Curb Your Enthusiasm, and why he always goes to an audition in character. Plus, he'll tell us about the time he told Howard Stern, and we quote: "You can't eat spaghetti on an open patio." Join us to learn exactly what he means!

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Ahmed Gallab of Sinkane. Adam Tetzloff/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Adam Tetzloff/Courtesy of the artist

Ahmed Gallab from the band Sinkane

Bullseye guest host Shereen Marisol Meraji, host of NPR's Code Switch, talks with the musician Ahmed Gallab. You might know Ahmed as the man behind the band Sinkane. Ahmed and Shereen discuss his latest album, growing up in the U.S. as the son of immigrants and how he connects his Sudanese roots to his music. Sinkane's latest album is titled Dépaysé and is available now.

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Tales of the City's Garcia

Guest Host Shereen Marisol Meraji, host of NPR's Code Switch, chats with actor Garcia. Garcia plays Jake Rodriguez on 'Tales of the City' on Netflix, a part-remake part-sequel to the TV miniseries you might remember from the 90's. Garcia and Shereen discuss their first breakout role, being pigeonholed as a trans character in Hollywood and how their chosen family led them to acting.

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WEST PALM BEACH, FL - FEBRUARY 22: Sean Doolittle #62 of the Washington Nationals poses for a photo during photo days at The Ballpark of the Palm Beaches on February 22, 2018 in West Palm Beach, Florida. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images) Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Washington Nationals relief pitcher Sean Doolittle

Pitcher Sean Doolittle is the closer for the Washington Nationals, and no, it's not The Closer you're thinking about. Sean's been called one of the most interesting players in baseball. He'll talk about his unorthodox path to the major leagues, starting out as a first baseman, recovering from serious injuries and then pivoting to closing out games on the mound. Sean's also known as one of the nicest guys in MLB. He's used his platform as a baseball player to raise awareness about a number of issues: He's worked with veteran groups, spoken out publicly for LGBT rights, and hosted a Thanksgiving dinner with Syrian refugees. This interview was recorded in 2017, back when Sean was at spring training with the Oakland A's.

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Edie Falco poses for a portrait during the 2010 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Matt Carr/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Carr/Getty Images

Edie Falco

This week, we're revisiting our conversation with Emmy-award winning actress Edie Falco. She's best known for her roles in The Sopranos, Oz and Nurse Jackie. When she spoke to us in 2018, she had just starred in the movie Outside In. Edie talks to Jesse about landing her first acting gig — which she started the day after she graduated from acting school at SUNY Purchase. Plus, Edie tells us why she thinks comedy isn't for her, and what it was like to work with James Gandolfini for nearly a decade on The Sopranos.

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Linda Holmes Tim Coburn/NA hide caption

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Linda Holmes, pop culture critic and author of 'Evvie Drake Starts Over'

Linda Holmes is a pop culture critic and host of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour. She just released her debut novel, Evvie Drake Starts Over. It's about love and loss and the choices we make that sometimes require us to start from scratch. Linda joins the show to talk about her start in writing and how the game of baseball contains a great lesson on the importance of perseverance.

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Joe Talbot, director of 'The Last Black Man in San Francisco'

Joe Talbot is the director of The Last Black Man in San Francisco. It's a beautiful film about a guy named Jimmie and his desire to reclaim a San Francisco house built by his grandfather, many moons before tech booms rolled in and massive amounts of money changed the city. Joe talks about gentrification, his thoughts on authenticity in the Bay Area and the best reaction to a movie Jesse has ever heard.

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