Bullseye with Jesse Thorn Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

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Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

Most Recent Episodes

Aya Cash attends the IMDb Studio at Acura Festival Village on location at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival on January 24, 2020 in Park City, Utah. Rich Polk/Getty Images for IMDb hide caption

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Rich Polk/Getty Images for IMDb

Aya Cash on the song that changed her life

Actor Aya Cash joins us on Bullseye for the latest installment of The Song That Changed My Life. It's a segment where creators we know and love talk about the music who made them who they are. Aya has played in a number of memorable roles, and these days, she stars in the very funny sitcom Welcome to Flatch. When we asked her about the song that changed her life, she took us back to her childhood. Back to the nineties when she was growing up in the San Francisco Bay Area, riding in the car with mom and dad listening to a classic song by Ani DiFranco.

Aya Cash on the song that changed her life

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Blockbuster. (L to R) Melissa Fumero as Eliza, Randall Park as Timmy in Blockbuster. Cr. Ricardo Hubbs/Netflix © 2022 RICARDO HUBBS/NETFLIX/RICARDO HUBBS/NETFLIX hide caption

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Vanessa Ramos on Netflix's 'Blockbuster'

Vanessa Ramos is a television writer. She's written for shows like Superstore, Bordertown, Crashing and Brooklyn Nine-Nine. Her latest show is called Blockbuster on Netflix. It's a sitcom set at the very last franchise location of Blockbuster, and the employees who try to keep the store alive. We talk with Vanessa about creating the new sitcom, and her own memories of Blockbuster, and what VHS tapes were most important to her. Plus, how she got her start in comedy and what it was like to be in the writers room for Comedy Central Roasts.

Vanessa Ramos on Netflix's 'Blockbuster'

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I Wish I Made That: Guy Branum on "Lady Bird"

Occasionally, we like to ask some of our favorite creators about a work of art they wish they'd created. This time, our guest is Guy Branum. When we asked Guy about the thing he wishes he had made, he picked a movie: 2017's Lady Bird, a classic coming-of-age story set in the early 2000s and directed by Greta Gerwig. Guy is a comedian who's appeared on Last Comic Standing, hosted the TV show Talk Show the Game Show, wrote and produced for The Mindy Project, and much more. He most recently appeared on the big screen in Bros.

I Wish I Made That: Guy Branum on "Lady Bird"

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Kevin Ferguson

Violinist, singer and songwriter Sudan Archives

Sudan Archives has been making music for all her life. She grew up in Ohio, where she played violin in church and school bands. When she got her high school diploma, she headed out to Los Angeles to follow her dream of making music. Sudan Archives is a violinist who breaks new ground with what the instrument can do in pop music. She combines the instrument with her voice, her beatmaking and her songwriting, creating music that is truly mesmerizing. She joins Bullseye to talk about her music and new album Natural Brown Prom Queen. She also talks about her process for creating music and performing it live. Plus, Sudan dives into some of the violinists who inspire her.

Violinist, singer and songwriter Sudan Archives

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Shea Serrano

Journalist and author Shea Serrano has covered basketball and pop culture for ESPN, XXL, Grantland, the Ringer and more. His first book, The Rap Yearbook, is a New York Times bestseller and a critical favorite. When we first talked with Serrano in 2017, he'd just followed it up with Basketball and Other Things, a book that is kind of like a written version of a late night party discussion with friends - with cool illustrations. Serrano covers topics like "great basketball villains" and "which NBA players get remembered for the wrong reasons?" He's since released Movies and Other Things - a similar book with movie rankings, hot takes and more ice breakers. This past month he expanded the illustrated series with another entry: Hip-Hop and Other Things. A version of this interview originally aired in October of 2017.

Shea Serrano

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SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 24: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar attends the 2019 NBA Awards at Barker Hangar on June 24, 2019 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images) Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Fury/Getty Images

NBA Hall Of Famer: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is one of the greatest basketball players of all time: an NBA Hall of Famer, six-time MVP, 19-time All-Star, the master of the skyhook shot and a key part of the Showtime era Lakers. Since retiring from basketball, Abdul-Jabbar has written books, columns and even worked as a writer for Veronica Mars. When we talked with Kareem Abdul-Jabbar last year, he'd just narrated a documentary: Fight the Power: The Movements That Changed America. We'll revisit our conversation with the NBA legend. Kareem discusses playing alongside Magic Johnson, his roller disco days, and so much more. Plus, he shares why he was never able to play a game of Double Dutch as a kid. A version of this interview originally aired in June of 2021

NBA Hall Of Famer: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

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Bashir Salahuddin as Sherman McDaniels in Sherman's Showcase Season 2. Michael Moriatis/IFC hide caption

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Bashir Salahuddin on Sherman's Showcase and South Side

Bashir Salahuddin is a comedy actor and writer. Alongside his friend and longtime collaborator Diallo Riddle, he co-created the shows South Side and Sherman's Showcase. South Side is a very funny sitcom that follows the stories of everyday people living on Chicago's South Side. The other show they created is Sherman's Showcase. The show's sort of like a sketch show, but with a unique format that's comparable to a variety show. Bashir Salahuddin stops by Bullseye to talk about Sherman's Showcase, and shares how it draws inspiration from shows like Soul Train and The Muppet Show. He also talks about meeting Riddle while in an acapella group at Harvard. Plus, Bashir shares how casting real Chicagoans in South Side has helped make the series even more hilarious.

Bashir Salahuddin on Sherman's Showcase and South Side

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Bruce McCulloch

Bruce McCulloch is one of the founding members of the legendary Canadian sketch comedy team The Kids in the Hall. He starred in the eponymous TV show that aired for five seasons in both Canada and the U.S., and the follow-up movie Brain Candy. Earlier this year, Bruce rejoined his original KITH crew for their return to TV on Amazon Prime. Bruce also spends his time working behind the camera. He's directed sketches, music videos for bands like Tragically Hip, and his most recent project: Tallboyz. Tallboyz is a sketch comedy TV show featuring four young and talented Canadian comedians. Bruce joins Bullseye to talk about his trajectory from being a young punk in Calgary that got into bar fights to a beloved fixture in the sketch comedy world.

Bruce McCulloch

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Billy Idol on the song that changed his life

The Song That Changed My Life is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite artists about the music that made them who they are today. Billy Idol throws us back to 1954, to one of the first songs Elvis Presley ever recorded: That's All Right. He first heard the song at an Elvis convention with his sister in the '70s. At the time he was playing in punk rock bands and a lot of punk rockers disliked Elvis. Idol defends Elvis, and explains how the song changed how he approached his craft when he was first starting out.

Billy Idol on the song that changed his life

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Recording artist "Weird Al" Yankovic attends Pre-GRAMMY Gala and Salute to Industry Icons Honoring Debra Lee at The Beverly Hilton on February 11, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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"Weird Al" Yankovic

"Weird Al" Yankovic is the undisputed king of parody music. He's been recording music for over 40 years and sold millions of records. He's got an iconic voice, the chops for pop and a sense of humor that's both distinct and approachable. After all this time, Weird Al is getting the biopic treatment. Weird: The Al Yankovic Story was co-written by Al himself and debuts on the Roku channel on Friday, November 4th. He joins Bullseye to talk about Weird and the creation process behind the film. He also talks about how he got into making music and learning to play the accordion at a young age. Plus, he tells us about the time he decided he could make a living out of recording parody songs about food.

"Weird Al" Yankovic

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