Bullseye with Jesse Thorn Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)
Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

From NPR

Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

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BYRON BAY, AUSTRALIA - APRIL 18: Buddy Guy performs live for fans at the 2014 Byron Bay Bluesfest on April 18, 2014 in Byron Bay, Australia. (Photo by Matt Roberts/Getty Images) Getty Images hide caption

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The Song That Changed My Life: Buddy Guy

The Song That Changed My Life is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite artists about the music that made them who they are today. This time around, we're joined by guitarist Buddy Guy. Buddy is one of the greatest blues guitarists alive today. From his home studio in Chicago, Buddy took us back to his childhood in Louisiana. He explains how John Lee Hooker's song Boogie Chillen' encouraged him to learn the guitar in his early teens. Plus, he shares a story about getting to meet his hero, John Lee Hooker; and becoming friends with him, too. Check out Buddy Guy: The Blues Chase The Blues Away on your local PBS station or on PBS.org.

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Jessica St. Clair and Dan O'Brien attend PEN America 2018 LitFest Gala at the Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel on November 02, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for PEN America hide caption

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Charley Gallay/Getty Images for PEN America

Jessica St. Clair and Dan O'Brien

Jessica St. Clair is a comedy writer and actor. Alongside Lennon Parham, she created and starred in the comedy series Playing House, which aired for three seasons on USA. Dan O'Brien is her husband of 15 years and works as a poet and playwright. He is also a former Guggenheim fellow whose work has shown off-Broadway and in London. Jessica and Dan have experienced and survived cancer together. They both had separate diagnoses and different treatments. A few years back, Jessica was diagnosed with breast cancer, and shortly after Dan was diagnosed with stage four colon cancer. It was an intense and freighting time for both of them and as they have recovered, it has inspired their work. They join Bullseye to talk about Dan's new book Our Cancers and the year and half of being treated for cancer that inspired it. Jessica and Dan also talk about how their battles with cancer affected their child, their relationship, and their careers.

Jessica St. Clair and Dan O'Brien

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I Wish I'd Made That: Nick Offerman

Artists, musicians, and filmmakers are often inspired by what they see or hear. Sometimes that thing is so great, they tell us they wish they made it themselves. It happens so often we made a segment about it called I Wish I'd Made That. The one and only Nick Offerman joins us this time around. Nick is probably best known as Ron Swanson on Parks and Recreation. When we asked him if there was any TV show, movie or album he wishes he made, Nick said he leaves that to the professionals. Usually, our guests pick a movie or a TV show they love. But, Nick decided to channel his love of woodworking and tell us about the greatest guitar he ever held in his hands: The Gibson J-200.

I Wish I'd Made That: Nick Offerman

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(EDITORS NOTE: Image has been converted to black and white.) NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MARCH 07: Michael K. Williams poses for the 2021 Critics Choice Awards on March 07, 2021 in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. (Photo by Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for ABA) Getty Images for ABA hide caption

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Remembering Michael K. Williams

Actor Michael K. Williams died earlier this month. He was 54 years old. He was best known for playing Omar Little on The Wire. Michael began his career in entertainment first as a dancer in New York, then an actor with a handful of walk-on credits. By the time he auditioned for The Wire he was in his mid-30s. When Jesse Thorn talked with him in 2016, he was starring in a show called Hap and Leonard. When we heard the news about Williams' passing, we went into the archives to listen back to our conversation. There's some stuff you might've heard in the past, a lot of stuff you haven't.

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Musician David Byrne attends the Brooklyn Artists Ball 2017 at Brooklyn Museum. Theo Wargo via Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo via Getty Images

David Byrne

David Byrne! The one and only. The founder of the Talking Heads talks with Jesse about his latest project American Utopia, and his return to playing live music. He also shares some of the music he's been listening to lately and tells us about where he learned his iconic dance moves. Plus, he'll tell us why his very different brain powers his art.

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Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis

Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis have been working together for 40 years, producing some of the biggest R&B records of all time. In their four decades of working together, the fedora-wearing giants of R&B music have written and produced over 40 top-ten hits. They've worked with Prince, Babyface, Usher, Mariah Carey, Janet Jackson and more — the list goes on and on. All that producing hadn't left them a lot of time to write songs of their own, but lucky for us, that's changed. This past July they released their first ever album as recording artists. It's called "Jam & Lewis, Volume 1," and it sure was worth the wait. It features vocals from a bunch of their collaborators: Mary J. Blige, Boys II Men, Morris Day and more. The music legends join Bullseye to talk about the new album, the hits they contributed vocals to, and the jaw-dropping synthesizer work they do on the Janet Jackson single "Love Will Never Do."

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LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 19: Musician Rostam Batmanglij performs onstage at The Greek Theatre on October 19, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images) Getty Images hide caption

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Rostam on the Paul Simon song that changed his life

The Song That Changed My Life is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite artists about the music that made them who they are today. This time around we're joined by singer songwriter Rostam. He got his start as a member of Vampire Weekend. He produced the band's first three records, including some of their biggest hits. He's since left the band but keeps busy producing. He collaborated on a record with Hamilton Leithauser of the Walkmen in 2016, followed that up with his solo debut, and produced the acclaimed Haim record Women in Music Pt. III. Rostam joins us to talk about The Coast by Paul Simon. Rostam explains how the song helped him visualize and produce the first Vampire Weekend album. Plus, he'll shares a story about the time he met Paul Simon when the band performed on SNL. Rostam's second solo album Changephobia is out now.

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Hannah Waddingham as Rebecca Welton in "Ted Lasso" season one, now streaming on Apple TV+ Photo: Apple TV+ hide caption

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Photo: Apple TV+

Ted Lasso's Hannah Waddingham: Emmy noms, GoT, and more

Hannah Waddingham stars alongsie Jason Sudekis in Ted Lasso. She plays team owner Rebecca Welton in the series. Hannah joins guest host Linda Holmes of NPR's Pop Culture Happy Hour to chat about her role in Ted Lasso. Plus, she talks about her years of performing in theater, her iconic part on Game of Thrones, *and* what it's like to perform in an award-winning musical when a mouse is stuck in your dress.

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Uzo Aduba: In Treatment, Orange is the New Black and more

Uzo Aduba first rose to fame playing a character known as Crazy Eyes. It was on Orange Is the New Black, a part of the first class of original TV shows on Netflix. Crazy Eyes, whose real name is Suzanne, was one of the many prisoners in the women's correctional facility the show focused on. Aduba won two Emmys for her portrayal of Suzanne, one for comedy and the other for drama. Since Orange is the New Black, Aduba has gone on to even bigger and better things. She played Shirley Chisolm in the Hulu miniseries Mrs. America. She's performed on Broadway. And, recently, she's starred in the HBO series In Treatment. So we're thrilled to have Uzo Aduba on the show, and just as excited to Tre'vell Anderson, the writer and host of FANTI, interviewing her.

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A captured still from Zion I's "Tech $" Zion I / Anthony Cole for Lightworkers Republic hide caption

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Zion I / Anthony Cole for Lightworkers Republic

Bonus: Remembering Zumbi, of Zion I

Zumbi, born Steve Gaines, made up half of the Oakland duo Zion I, who were stalwarts of the Bay Area hip-hop scene for decades. Zumbi died at 49 and what follows is an appreciation of his art and music. Jesse shares some words about Zumbi and we play a clip from Zion I's 2009 live performance at SF Sketchfest.

Bonus: Remembering Zumbi, of Zion I

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