Bullseye with Jesse Thorn Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)
Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

From NPR

Bullseye from NPR is your curated guide to culture. Jesse Thorn hosts in-depth interviews with brilliant creators, culture picks from our favorite critics and irreverent original comedy. Bullseye has been featured in Time, The New York Times, GQ and McSweeney's, which called it "the kind of show people listen to in a more perfect world." (Formerly known as The Sound of Young America.)

Most Recent Episodes

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA - NOVEMBER 11: Catherine O'Hara attends the Premiere Of HBO Documentary Film "Very Ralph" at The Paley Center for Media on November 11, 2019 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images) Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images

Catherine O'Hara, star of Schitt's Creek

Catherine O'Hara is a comedy legend. Her work embodies a particularly special brand of comic absurdity. She helped launch SCTV alongside other burgeoning comedy greats like John Candy and Eugene Levy. She went on to star in some huge blockbuster comedies: Beetlejuice. Home Alone. Best in Show. At the Emmy awards a few weeks ago Schitt's Creek swept the comedy category. Catherine won a much-deserved Emmy for her lead role on the show. We're taking a moment to celebrate her Emmy win by revisiting our conversation from 2013. When Catherine joined us she talked to us about creating memorable characters with her longtime friend and collaborator Eugene Levy, and her own secret comedic formula.

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Noah Hawley, creator of TV's 'Fargo'

Guest host Julie Klausner is joined by Noah Hawley. Noah's the creator and showrunner behind the hit television series Fargo. Season 4 of the series kicks off next week and we've got all of your pressing questions about the season up for discussion. We chat about about the challenges of storytelling during a shutdown, setting adequate intentions going into season 4 and working with Chris Rock— this season's lead. Plus, Noah talks to us about how he creates a show that has all of the "feeling" of the Coen Brothers' original film... without any of its characters.

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Musician Frank Turner

Frank Turner talks with guest host Jordan Morris about his new album, a split LP with punk legends NOFX. They'll also talk about the communal experience of singing around an acoustic guitar, and how The Clash inspired him to make a big life decision as a young man. Plus, Frank tells us about the coolest thing an 11-year old can order from a catalog!

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Bonus: Simon Rich reads from 'Hits & Misses'

Simon Rich is a novelist and screenwriter who has worked on Saturday Night Live. He created and wrote for the show Man Seeking Woman and Miracle Workers, a very funny anthology series starring Daniel Radcliffe and Steve Buscemi. His latest work can be seen in An American Pickle from HBO Max. The movie is based on a short story Simon wrote in 2013. A while back, Simon was able to swing by and read a few selections from his most recent short story collection, Hits and Misses. They say history is written by the victors. Celebrating the exploits of so-called great men. The Washingtons. The Lincolns. The Paul Reveres. And history is never, ever, written by the horses these great men rode. Until now.

Bonus: Simon Rich reads from 'Hits & Misses'

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Pavement's Stephen Malkmus

The Song That Changed My Life is a segment that gives us the chance to talk with some of our favorite artists about the music that made them who they are today. This time around, we're joined by Stephen Malkmus, the former frontman of Pavement. The band's been called one of the best acts from the '90s. The band broke up in 1999, and Malkmus has kept on, as prolific as ever, dropping 9 records since 2001. His latest record is out now, it's called "Traditional Techniques." When we asked him to dish on a song that made him who he is today, he kind of threw us a curveball. His pick: "Love Will Keep Us Together" by Captain & Tenille.

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Maya Erskine and Anna Konkle, PEN15 creators and stars

Ahead of their second season we'll revisit our interview with PEN15's Maya Erskine and Anna Konkle. They are the stars and creators of the very funny Hulu show. It's about two middle school girls coming of age in the early 2000s. The show deals with sensitive topics like getting your first period or being bullied, but also has tons of heart and humor.

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The Isley Brothers' Ernie Isley

We're looking back on Jesse's 2015 interview with musician Ernie Isley of legendary The Isley Brothers. Ernie talks to Jesse about the evolving sound of The Isley Brothers, a life-changing gig playing drums for Martha and The Vandellas, and what it was like to grow up with Jimi Hendrix occasionally living at your house.

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ANAHEIM, CA - JANUARY 27: Musician Bootsy Collins onstage at The 2018 NAMM Show at Anaheim Convention Center on January 27, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images Getty Images for NAMM) Jesse Grant/Getty Images for NAMM hide caption

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Bootsy Collins, Funk Legend

First up this week, Jesse's 2011 interview with funk bass legend Bootsy Collins. A bassist by happenstance, in his teen years Bootsy was discovered and hired by James Brown to be part of the band The J.B.'s. At only 19, he was on the rise and made the move to play with another inventive funk artist, George Clinton, as part of Parliament-Funkadelic. He later formed the pioneering Bootsy's Rubber Band. Bootsy talks to Jesse about his career as one of pop music's greatest bass players, being on the forefront of funk, and playing with James Brown.

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Author Jeff VanderMeer

This week, guest host Jordan Morris talks to Jeff VanderMeer about what inspires his writing.The NY Times Best-Selling author has a new book out that is a sort diversion from his norm. It's targeted toward a younger audience but keeps all of the wonder and fun of his previous works. His 2014 novel, "Annihilation" won the Nebula award and was turned into a 2018 film of the same name. Jordan chats with Jeff about how his writing process has evolved, what it's like collaborating on projects after being self-published and what it's like doing a book tour from home. Plus, we'll ask him about how his parents shaped the way he looks at the world.

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(Photo by Brian Ach/Getty Images for TechCrunch) Brian Ach/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Winter on reviving "Bill & Ted" and returning to acting

In case you haven't heard: Bill and Ted are back! And today we're joined by Alex Winter. Alex talks with Carrie Poppy about his new movie Bill & Ted Face the Music, his documentary about former child stars, Showbiz Kids, and why he left acting for 25 years. Plus, he'll reveal what the "S" in Bill S. Preston Esq. stands for. San Dimas High School Football rules!

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