The NPR Politics Podcast Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.
The NPR Politics Podcast
NPR

The NPR Politics Podcast

From NPR

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Most Recent Episodes

Why Women Seek Abortions After 15 Weeks

The Supreme Court could allow Mississippi's ban on abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy to take effect. In the United States, many women end up getting abortions after that point because of clinic backlogs and cost issues.

Why Women Seek Abortions After 15 Weeks

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The High Cost Of Vaccine Conspiracies

An NPR analysis finds that people living in counties which strongly supported Donald Trump in the 2020 election could be three times more likely to die of coronavirus than those in counties which strongly supported Joe Biden. That difference appears to be driven by partisan differences in vaccination rates, as vaccine conspiracies spread among far-right voters.

The High Cost Of Vaccine Conspiracies

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Congress Completed One Thing On Its To-Do List, But Deadlines Keep Closing In

Congress passed a short-term funding bill to avoid a government shutdown, but they only punted and they still have a long list of things to do before the end of the year. Plus, there's a lot of talk about Vice President Harris and Transportation Secretary Buttigieg. Will they or won't they run for president in 2024?

Congress Completed One Thing On Its To-Do List, But Deadlines Keep Closing In

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Why Two Experts Think The Supreme Court Is Prepared To Roll Back Roe V. Wade

The Supreme Court heard arguments for a case that challenges the foundation of Roe v. Wade, the decision that originally made abortion legal. In their questioning, the conservative justices seemed primed to overturn the fifty year old precedent. That decision would radically change abortion access in the United States.

Why Two Experts Think The Supreme Court Is Prepared To Roll Back Roe V. Wade

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The Big Consequences Of Small Changes To Congressional Maps

Congressional districts are redrawn every ten years by state legislatures. In theory it is so populations are accurately represented when voting, but partisan gerrymandering means when you look at the map you'll probably see some really wonky shapes. We look at two states, Texas and Georgia, where redistricting will have major consequences for politicians and policy.

The Big Consequences Of Small Changes To Congressional Maps

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Congress Has A LOT To Do, But Can They Stop Fighting For Long Enough To Do It?

Congress and, in particular, congressional Democrats have a long to-do list before the end of the year. But inter- and intra-party disputes threaten any kind of action. So what are the disagreements, and when push comes to shove can they get the job done?

Congress Has A LOT To Do, But Can They Stop Fighting For Long Enough To Do It?

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What Do You Need To Know About Omicron? Biden Says Be Concerned But Don't Panic

A new Covid-19 variant called Omicron is spreading throughout the world and public health officials are worried about its transmissibility. President Biden addressed the nation saying, "this variant is a cause for concern — not a cause for panic." But the variant is reigniting anxieties about the pandemic.

What Do You Need To Know About Omicron? Biden Says Be Concerned But Don't Panic

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The Docket: What Is Executive Privilege And What Are Its Limits?

In order to resist a congressional investigation into the January 6th insurrection, former President Trump and his associates are claiming executive privilege. They say the communication between a president and his advisers should remain confidential. Congress says it wants to get to the bottom of what the president knew. So where does executive privilege come from, and does it take precedent over congress' power to investigate?

The Docket: What Is Executive Privilege And What Are Its Limits?

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Remembering NPR Political Reporter Cokie Roberts

Cokie Roberts was one of NPR's "Founding Mothers," a pioneering journalist whose career blazed a trail for generations of women at the network. NPR's Tamara Keith and Nina Totenberg talk to Cokie's husband Steve Roberts about the ways in which she was also a role model in her personal life. Steve Roberts new book about his wife is Cokie: A Life Well Lived.

Remembering NPR Political Reporter Cokie Roberts

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Will Biden's Signature Achievements Prove More Popular Than The Affordable Care Act?

Though it has grown more popular with time, the Affordable Care Act was widely disliked by the public in 2010 and cost Democrats dearly in the midterms. Democrats failed to successfully explain the legislation's benefits in the face of Republican attacks. Could Biden's infrastructure plan and, should it pass, social programs bill face the same fate?

Will Biden's Signature Achievements Prove More Popular Than The Affordable Care Act?

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