The NPR Politics Podcast Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

The NPR Politics Podcast

From NPR

Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

Most Recent Episodes

The U.S. Supreme Court on October 4, 2023. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Supreme Court Hearing May Lead To Lighter Sentences For Some Jan. 6th Rioters

More than 300 defendants have been charged with obstructing or attempting to obstruct an official congressional proceeding in connection to the Jan. 6 insurrection. But, so far, federal judges have disagreed about whether the statute was meant to apply only to the destruction of documents and records, not events like those on Jan 6. If the Supreme Court finds in favor of the rioters, many could see their jail sentences substantially reduced.

Supreme Court Hearing May Lead To Lighter Sentences For Some Jan. 6th Rioters

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Former President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower on his way to Manhattan criminal court, Monday, April 15, 2024, in New York. The hush money trial of former President Donald Trump begins Monday with jury selection. It's a singular moment for American history as the first criminal trial of a former U.S. commander in chief. Yuki Iwamura/AP hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AP

Donald Trump's First Criminal Trial Begins In New York

Trump faces 34 felony counts alleging that he falsified New York business records in order to conceal damaging information to influence the 2016 presidential election. This is the first time in U.S. history a former president will be tried on criminal charges.

Donald Trump's First Criminal Trial Begins In New York

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Joe Biden, left, embraces Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., during a Democratic presidential primary debate, Friday, Feb. 7, 2020, at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

Will Debt Forgiveness And Gun Regulations Improve Biden's Standing Among The Young?

The Biden administration unveiled new, targeted student debt forgiveness and new regulations on gun sales this week. The maneuvers appear targeted to boost the president's standing among young voters, who express lower levels of support for Biden compared to older age groups.

Will Debt Forgiveness And Gun Regulations Improve Biden's Standing Among The Young?

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This is the Erie County Courthouse in Erie, Pa., Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Making Sense Of A Swing County: Erie, Pennsylvania

Erie, Pa., supported Barack Obama in the 2008 and 2012 elections, Donald Trump in 2016 and Joe Biden in 2020. What makes the county such a reliable bellwether? And how are campaign operatives there feeling about this year's race?

Making Sense Of A Swing County: Erie, Pennsylvania

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Alabama state Sen. Vivian Davis Figures, D-Mobile, holds a copy of a GOP proposal at the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery, Ala., on Tuesday, July 18, 2023. Kim Chandler/AP hide caption

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Kim Chandler/AP

This Alabama Congressional Seat Is At The Heart Of The Voting Rights Fight

We go deep on Alabama's second congressional district ahead of a primary runoff there next week. The Supreme Court forced the state to redraw its congressional maps to bolster the rights of the state's Black voters, a win that surprised voting rights advocates after previous decisions by the high court curtailed other protects in the Voting Rights Act.

This Alabama Congressional Seat Is At The Heart Of The Voting Rights Fight

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Former President Donald Trump pumps his fist as he arrives for a GOP fundraiser, Saturday, April 6, 2024, in Palm Beach, Fla. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Trump Made An Abortion Policy Video And Stayed Silent About A National Ban

The presumptive Republican presidential nominee said Monday that abortion access was a state issue and that he supports access in the case of rape, incest, or to protect the life of the mother. Top Trump allies working outside of the campaign already have a proposed framework, including using existing legislation to implement a de facto national ban.

Trump Made An Abortion Policy Video And Stayed Silent About A National Ban

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Speaker of the House Mike Johnson, R-La., center, joined by, from left, Majority Whip Tom Emmer, R-Minn., Republican Conference Chair Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., and House Majority Leader Steve Scalise, R-La., talks with reporters ahead of the debate and vote on supplemental aid to Israel, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 2, 2023. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The Latest On Military Aid To Israel and Ukraine: Still Murky

Congress is headed back to Washington. With funding deadlines in the review mirror, they are turning their attention to foreign military aid. But Republicans and Democrats are voicing concerns about Ukraine and Israel, respectively, and there's a looming threat against Speaker Johnson. Oh, and there's some impeachments to talk about.

The Latest On Military Aid To Israel and Ukraine: Still Murky

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President Joe Biden speaks in the Indian Treaty Room at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Wednesday, April 3, 2024. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Can One Phone Call Make A Difference?

In a call Thursday to Israel's prime minister, President Biden told Benjamin Netanyahu the U.S. needed to see more humanitarian aid flowing into Gaza and protections to civilians on the ground or else the U.S. would reconsider its policies toward Israel. The call comes as Biden faces criticism from some Democrats for his handling of the war.

Can One Phone Call Make A Difference?

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A voter braves a cold rain running to cast a ballot during the Spring election Tuesday, April 2, 2024, in Fox Point, Wisconsin. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Morry Gash/AP

Solving The Racial & Ethnic Voter Registration Gap

In a pivotal election year, U.S. democracy continues to face a persistent challenge among the country's electorate — gaps in voter registration rates between white eligible voters and eligible voters of color. Long-standing barriers to voter registration have made it difficult to close these gaps, and dedicated investment is needed to ensure fuller participation in elections and a healthier democracy, many researchers and advocates say.

Solving The Racial & Ethnic Voter Registration Gap

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Demonstrators rally in support of Palestinians, Tuesday, April 2, 2024, at Lafayette Park across from the White House in Washington. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Dems Face Primaries Over Criticism Of Israel

As Israel's war with Hamas in Gaza enters its sixth month, Democratic members of Congress who are part of "the Squad" and have criticized Israel's actions are facing primary challengers backed by pro-Israel groups. It's a sign of further division in the party over present and future U.S. support of Israel.

Dems Face Primaries Over Criticism Of Israel

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