Embedded Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.
2/12-3/16
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Embedded

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Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.

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Rick Hutzell, right, the editor for the Capital Gazette, is joined by staff members, from left, reporter Selene San Felice, and photojournalists Paul W. Gillespie and Joshua McKerrow, as he rings a bell during a moment of silence at 2:33 p.m. to commemorate their fallen co-workers on Thursday, July 5, 2018. Brian Krista/Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service via Getty I hide caption

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Brian Krista/Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service via Getty I

Capital Gazette: "It's OK That We're Alive"

Part 2: How do you try to return to normal after a mass shooting? The Capital Gazette moves into a tiny, temporary office, and staff members confront the challenges of producing a daily paper while dealing with fear and guilt.

Capital Gazette: "It's OK That We're Alive"

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The front page of The Capital Gazette newspaper the day after a mass shooting occured at the paper's office. Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR

Capital Gazette: "A Damn Paper"

Part 1: Five colleagues are shot dead. Everyone is traumatized. On that day, June 28, 2018, what can the remaining staff of the Capital Gazette do that might make a difference? Publish "a damn paper."

Capital Gazette: "A Damn Paper"

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Mitchell MacNaughton/NPR

Coming Soon: The Capital Gazette

In a new four-part series, Embedded listeners will get to know the surviving staff of The Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, MD, where a gunman murdered five people in June 2018.

Coming Soon: The Capital Gazette

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Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol, breaking windows in the historic building and clashing with the Capitol Police on Jan. 6. Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

January 6: Inside The Capitol Siege

You may have seen fragments of footage from the siege on the Capitol. Now, hear from those who lived it.

January 6: Inside The Capitol Siege

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Sen. Mitch McConnell speaks at a news conference on Miguel A. Estrada's withdrawal of his nomination to be a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. That day, Republicans castigated Democrats for "obstructing" the nominations of Estrada and other judicial candidates. Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Judges

Mitch McConnell has consistently rejected the rules and norms that once guided Supreme Court nominations. He says he's taken his cue from the Democrats. This week, we dig into the history that shaped Mitch McConnell's views on judicial nominations.

Essential Mitch: The Judges

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell walks to a closed-door GOP policy lunch on Capitol Hill in 2016. Senate Republicans, including McConnell, argued that appointing a Supreme Court justice was too important to be determined by a lame-duck president. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Essential Mitch: The Interview

Embedded heads to the U.S. Senate for an in-depth conversation with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Essential Mitch: The Interview

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell escorts President Donald Trump after a meeting in McConnell's office. Bill Clark/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Trump Question

This week, Embedded takes a look at how Mitch McConnell managed four years of the Trump Presidency with shrewdness and surprising success.

Essential Mitch: The Trump Question

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Sen. John McCain and Sen. Mitch McConnell talk to reporters after a meeting on the campaign finance reform bill in 2002. Scott J. Ferrell/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott J. Ferrell/Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Money, Part 2

A lot of us don't pay much attention to money in politics. But Mitch McConnell does. And unlike most politicians, he speaks bluntly in favor of more political spending, not less. That stance led to a long battle with one Senator, who fought McConnell harder than just about anyone else.

Essential Mitch: The Money, Part 2

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Sens. Mitch McConnell and John McCain walk down a corridor to a TV studio, where they will discuss their different positions on the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform bill. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

Essential Mitch: The Money, Part 1

Mitch McConnell has no problem with money in politics. In fact, his view is the more the better. This week, Embedded digs into Mitch McConnell's long and singularly focused effort to keep the money pipeline open and flowing into American politics.

Essential Mitch: The Money, Part 1

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Mitch McConnell was elected Jefferson County judge-executive in 1977 and was re-elected in 1981. Lexington Herald-Leader/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Lexington Herald-Leader/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Early Years

What is it about Mitch? How did a politician famous for his lack of charisma become one of the most powerful men in Washington? This week, we continue our deep dive into the world of Mitch McConnell, looking back on his early years as an up-and-coming politician.

Essential Mitch: The Early Years

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