Embedded Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.
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Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.

Most Recent Episodes

Nicole Xu for NPR

On Our Watch: 20-20 Hindsight

After his son is shot and killed by a Richmond, Calif. police officer, a father looking for answers becomes a police transparency advocate. When the files about his son's death are released, they show an accountability system that seems to hang on one question: did the officer fear for their life? And in a rare interview, we hear from the officer who pulled the trigger.

On Our Watch: 20-20 Hindsight

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Nicole Xu for NPR

On Our Watch: Conduct Unbecoming

A police officer in Los Angeles told women he'd let their cars pass inspection if they had sex with him. In the San Francisco, Bay Area, another woman says an officer used police resources to harass and stalk her. The California Highway Patrol quietly fired both men for sexual harassment, but never looked into whether their misconduct was criminal. The second episode of the NPR series On Our Watch examines the system of accountability for officers who abuse their power for sex and exposes where that system falls short.

On Our Watch: Conduct Unbecoming

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On Our Watch: In Good Faith

In the small Northern California town of Rio Vista, a woman named Katheryn Jenks calls 911 for help. But after the police arrive, she ends up injured and inside a jail cell, facing serious charges. That same day, California Governor Jerry Brown signs a new law, State Senate Bill 1421, that opens up long hidden records of police misconduct, including files that might change the outcome of Jenks' case. This story is from the new NPR series, On Our Watch.

On Our Watch: In Good Faith

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ANNAPOLIS, MD - JULY 02: The Capital newspaper's logo is stenciled onto a newspaper vending machine following last week's shooting at the community newspaper's office July 2, 2018 in Annapolis, Maryland. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Capital Gazette: "We Are The Newsroom"

Part 4: In our final episode, the Capital Gazette is swept up in the troubles of the newspaper industry. Its corporate owners are making painful cuts, and a hedge fund with an ominous reputation seeks control. Staff members, who survived the 2018 shooting and kept the Capital going, wonder if the paper can last.

Capital Gazette: "We Are The Newsroom"

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ANNAPOLIS, MD - JUNE 28: Pat Furgurson (right), a reporter for the Capital Gazette, awaits a press briefing involving today's shooting in Annapolis, Maryland, on June 28, 2018. (Photo by Calla Kessler/The Washington Post via Getty Images) The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Capital Gazette: "I Know He Did It"

Part 3: The Capital Gazette takes on a new beat: itself. As the shooter's case works its way towards trial, the staff tries to balance coverage obligations with personal feelings.

Capital Gazette: "I Know He Did It"

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Rick Hutzell, right, the editor for the Capital Gazette, is joined by staff members, from left, reporter Selene San Felice, and photojournalists Paul W. Gillespie and Joshua McKerrow, as he rings a bell during a moment of silence at 2:33 p.m. to commemorate their fallen co-workers on Thursday, July 5, 2018. Brian Krista/Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service via Getty I hide caption

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Brian Krista/Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service via Getty I

Capital Gazette: "It's OK That We're Alive"

Part 2: How do you try to return to normal after a mass shooting? The Capital Gazette moves into a tiny, temporary office, and staff members confront the challenges of producing a daily paper while dealing with fear and guilt.

Capital Gazette: "It's OK That We're Alive"

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The front page of The Capital Gazette newspaper the day after a mass shooting occured at the paper's office. Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR/Claire Harbage/NPR

Capital Gazette: "A Damn Paper"

Part 1: Five colleagues are shot dead. Everyone is traumatized. On that day, June 28, 2018, what can the remaining staff of the Capital Gazette do that might make a difference? Publish "a damn paper."

Capital Gazette: "A Damn Paper"

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Mitchell MacNaughton/NPR

Coming Soon: The Capital Gazette

In a new four-part series, Embedded listeners will get to know the surviving staff of The Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, MD, where a gunman murdered five people in June 2018.

Coming Soon: The Capital Gazette

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Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol, breaking windows in the historic building and clashing with the Capitol Police on Jan. 6. Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

January 6: Inside The Capitol Siege

You may have seen fragments of footage from the siege on the Capitol. Now, hear from those who lived it.

January 6: Inside The Capitol Siege

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Sen. Mitch McConnell speaks at a news conference on Miguel A. Estrada's withdrawal of his nomination to be a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. That day, Republicans castigated Democrats for "obstructing" the nominations of Estrada and other judicial candidates. Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott J. Ferrell/Congressional Quarterly/Getty Images

Essential Mitch: The Judges

Mitch McConnell has consistently rejected the rules and norms that once guided Supreme Court nominations. He says he's taken his cue from the Democrats. This week, we dig into the history that shaped Mitch McConnell's views on judicial nominations.

Essential Mitch: The Judges

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