Embedded Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.
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Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.

Most Recent Episodes

Rescue workers look at the destruction caused by a 2016 flash flood along Main Street in Ellicott City, Md. Astrid Riecken/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Astrid Riecken/The Washington Post/Getty Images

There Is No Playbook

When a flash flood ripped through Old Ellicott City in Maryland, residents thought it was a freak occurrence. Instead, it was a sign of the future. And adapting to that future has been painful. To see photos from Ellicott city and video from the floods, go to npr.org/flooded.

There Is No Playbook

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High school students in Portland, Maine protest after a white man allegedly shouted racial slurs and attacked four black classmates. Portland Press Herald/Portland Press Herald via Getty hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Portland Press Herald via Getty

This Is Not A Joke

When a student starts down the path towards racist extremism, there's no set plan for how a school should respond. But teachers and fellow students are often the first to spot the warning signs. So what can they do?

This Is Not A Joke

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Family members place their hands on a memorial to the three victims of an April 2014 shooting in Overland Park, Kan. The shooter was a white supremacist, who targeted people at a Jewish community center and retirement home. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

The Terrorist

Frazier Glenn Miller spent years spreading racist, violent rhetoric, training Ku Klux Klan-affiliated paramilitary groups, and gathering arms to launch a "race war." But time and again, he escaped serious consequences. Many say that's because the government - and the media - failed to see the danger Miller posed until it was too late.

The Terrorist

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More than 300 miners in Harlan County, Kentucky unexpectedly found themselves unemployed when the company Blackjewel declared bankruptcy and shut down their mining operations. When a few of the miners learned the company was shipping out a final load of coal by rail they decided to blockade the tracks to prevent the shipment from leaving the mine until they were paid their overdue wages. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

End Of Summer Update

As the summer winds down, we're taking a look at the latest developments in two of our recent series. What's the story behind #MoscowMitch? And why have Kentucky coal miners been camped out on a set of train tracks for more than a month?

End Of Summer Update

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In this Oct. 25, 2010 file photo, demonstrators hold signs during a rally in support of a campaign to remove three state Supreme Court justices who joined in a unanimous ruling legalizing gay marriage in Des Moines, Iowa. Charlie Neibergall/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

There are more than 30,000 state judges in America. And the vast, vast majority of them are not shielded from politics: They have to fight for their seats in elections. Sometimes very contentious elections, funded by millions of dollars in dark money. Is that a good idea? And what does it mean for how justice works in our country?

Judges 2: 'Worse Than Willie Horton'

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A view of the U.S. Supreme Court at dusk. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Judges 1: 'A Downward Death Spiral'

The U.S. Supreme Court does not have an army to enforce its rulings, the way the President does. It doesn't control budgets, the way Congress does. So what happens when the process to nominate and confirm judges becomes so politicized that people start to lose faith in the courts?

Judges 1: 'A Downward Death Spiral'

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Mitch McConnell delivers a speech at the Republican National Convention in 2016. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Mitch Part 5: '9 And 0'

Mitch McConnell knows that he is not popular. But, he says, the only judgment that really matters is on election day. And of the people who have challenged him, he says, "so far, there have been nine losers."

Mitch Part 5: '9 And 0'

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President Donald Trump speaks with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as they head to an election rally in Kentucky in 2018. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Mitch Part 4: 'Not A Happy Choice'

Mitch McConnell says he never expected Donald Trump to become president. And during the campaign, he was openly critical of Trump's rhetoric. So how are these two very different men working together now? And how are they changing the country?

Mitch Part 4: 'Not A Happy Choice'

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Senator Mitch McConnell stands outside the U.S. Supreme Court with his legal team, who challenged the constitutionality of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance law. Douglas Graham/Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas Graham/Roll Call via Getty Images

Mitch Part 3: 'Darth Vader Has Arrived'

Mitch McConnell continues his rivalry with John McCain, and dramatically changes the role of money in American politics.

Mitch Part 3: 'Darth Vader Has Arrived'

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Mitch McConnell is one of the few politicians who have argued publicly that more money in politics is a good thing for democracy. In McConnell's view, political spending is a form of free speech. Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Maureen Keating/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Mitch Part 2: 'Money Money Money'

A lot of us don't pay much attention to money in politics. But Mitch McConnell does. And unlike most politicians, he speaks bluntly in favor of more political spending, not less. That stance led to a long battle with one Senator, who fought McConnell harder than just about anyone else.

Mitch Part 2: 'Money Money Money'

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