Embedded Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.
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Embedded

From NPR

Host Kelly McEvers takes a story from the news and goes deep. Whether that means digging into the Trump administration's past, the stories behind police shootings caught on video, or visiting a town ravaged by the opioid epidemic, Embedded takes you where the news is happening.

Most Recent Episodes

Not On the Same Team

A new NPR podcast delves into a world where the NRA is viewed as too soft on guns and where a new network of more extreme pro-gun groups is on the rise. We hear a preview of NPR's "No Compromise" podcast.

Not On the Same Team

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Olivia Grant hugs her grandmother, Mary Grace Sileo, through a plastic drop cloth in Wantagh, New York. As states and cities relax rules around the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of Americans are having to make fraught decisions around their health and safety. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

Covering Covid: Life After Lockdown

For weeks and weeks, when millions of Americans were still under lockdown, there were pretty clear rules about what to do. Now that things are opening up, many people are having to decide for themselves what's safe and what risks they're willing to take.

Covering Covid: Life After Lockdown

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A sign outside the Smithfield Foods pork processing plant in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, one of the country's largest known Coronavirus clusters. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Covering Covid: Essential

The workers who produce pork, chicken, and beef in plants around the country have been deemed "essential" by the government and their employers. Now, the factories where they work have become some of the largest clusters for the coronavirus in the country. The workers, many of whom are immigrants, say their bosses have not done enough to protect them.

Covering Covid: Essential

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Covering Covid: Backlash

A small but vocal minority of people are pushing back against public health measures experts say are life-saving. Turns out this is not the first time Americans have resisted government measures during a pandemic with lives at stake.

Covering Covid: Backlash

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Covering Covid: Couples

Amid a pandemic: couples getting together, staying together, falling apart.

Covering Covid: Couples

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Covering Covid: Not Enough Tests

What do you get when you have a deadly virus, fear, uncertainty and not enough tests? ... Also, we want to hear from you. If you or someone you know has tried to get anything calling itself an at home coronavirus test, write to reporter Tom Dreisbach (tdreisbach@npr.org or on Twitter @TomDreisbach). We also want to honor the people who've been lost to this virus. If you or someone you know has lost someone to covid-19 please reach out and tell us their story. Send us a voice memo or write us an email at embedded@npr.org.

Covering Covid: Not Enough Tests

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Covering Coronavirus

We're putting together episodes about this virus and we want to hear from you. You can send us a voice memo or an email to embedded@npr.org.

Covering Coronavirus

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Rescue workers look at the destruction caused by a 2016 flash flood along Main Street in Ellicott City, Md. Astrid Riecken/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Astrid Riecken/The Washington Post/Getty Images

There Is No Playbook

When a flash flood ripped through Old Ellicott City in Maryland, residents thought it was a freak occurrence. Instead, it was a sign of the future. And adapting to that future has been painful. To see photos from Ellicott city and video from the floods, go to npr.org/flooded.

There Is No Playbook

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High school students in Portland, Maine protest after a white man allegedly shouted racial slurs and attacked four black classmates. Portland Press Herald/Portland Press Herald via Getty hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Portland Press Herald via Getty

This Is Not A Joke

When a student starts down the path towards racist extremism, there's no set plan for how a school should respond. But teachers and fellow students are often the first to spot the warning signs. So what can they do?

This Is Not A Joke

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Family members place their hands on a memorial to the three victims of an April 2014 shooting in Overland Park, Kan. The shooter was a white supremacist, who targeted people at a Jewish community center and retirement home. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

The Terrorist

Frazier Glenn Miller spent years spreading racist, violent rhetoric, training Ku Klux Klan-affiliated paramilitary groups, and gathering arms to launch a "race war." But time and again, he escaped serious consequences. Many say that's because the government - and the media - failed to see the danger Miller posed until it was too late.

The Terrorist

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