Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.More from Code Switch »

Most Recent Episodes

Puerto Rico's Other Storm

An American flag and Puerto Rican flag fly next to each other in Old San Juan. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Puerto Rico's Other Storm

Long before Hurricane Maria devastated the territory, the threat of financial disaster loomed over Puerto Rico. Now, an old, bitter struggle over who gets to chart the islands' economic future is upending life for everyday Puerto Ricans trying to pick up the pieces.

Puerto Rico's Other Storm

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Ask Code Switch: School Daze

School is hard, man. Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Ask Code Switch: School Daze

For better or worse, classrooms have always been a site where our country's racial issues get worked out — whether its integration, busing, learning about this country's sordid racial history. On today's Ask Code Switch, we're talking about fitting in, standing out, and standing up for what you believe in.

Ask Code Switch: School Daze

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Update: Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

Finding love online isn't as easy as it might seem. Especially for same-sex couples. Marie Bertrand/Getty Images hide caption

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Marie Bertrand/Getty Images

Update: Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

In a unanimous decision, India's Supreme Court struck down a long-standing ban on gay sex. In light of this, we're revisiting an episode about same-sex love and dating apps for South Asians.

Update: Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

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Stuck Off The Realness

Prodigy of Mobb Deep performs on stage at Forest Hills Stadium in New York City. Gary Gershoff/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Gershoff/Getty Images

Stuck Off The Realness

Prodigy made up half of the hugely influential hip-hop duo Mobb Deep, but spent his life in excruciating pain due to a debilitating disease called sickle cell anemia. On this episode, the hosts of WNYC's The Realness podcast chronicle Prodigy's struggle with the disease, share the story of how the disease was discovered, and explain how black revolutionaries pressed their communities (and the President of the United States) to do something about it.

Stuck Off The Realness

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So What If He Said It?

Critics have been describing President Trump as racist for years. So, would a tape of him using the N-word make any difference in public perception? Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

So What If He Said It?

In recent weeks, rumors of a recording of President Trump using the N-Word have resurfaced. But critics have been describing Trump as racist for years. So, if this tape were to exist, would it even matter?

So What If He Said It?

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Live From Birmingham...It's Code Switch!

Code Switch, live from the Alys Stephens center at the University Of Alabama at Birmingham. Beau Gustafson/WBHM hide caption

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Beau Gustafson/WBHM

Live From Birmingham...It's Code Switch!

Shereen and Gene head to Alabama to talk about race in the American South. Mayor Randall Woodfin of Birmingham talks about growing up in the shadow of his city's history. The poet Ashley M. Jones shares how she learned to love her hometown. And Gigi Douban of WBHM takes on some tough listener questions about race in the Magic City.

Live From Birmingham...It's Code Switch!

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Behind The Lies My Teacher Told Me
Oivind Hovland/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Behind The Lies My Teacher Told Me

It's a battle that's endured throughout so much of American history: what gets written into our textbooks. Today we tag in NPR education correspondent Anya Kamenetz, and hear from author James Loewen about the book, Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong.

Behind The Lies My Teacher Told Me

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Talk American
Gillian Blease/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Talk American

What is the "Standard American Accent"? Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don't have it? Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest to find out.

Talk American

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Word Watch, The Sequel: 2Watch 2Wordiest
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Word Watch, The Sequel: 2Watch 2Wordiest

We're back this week with the grand finale of the Word Watch Game Show! First, we'll uncover the messy history of the term "white trash." Then we'll get into a ditty that signals ... anything "Asian." Come play with us!

Word Watch, The Sequel: 2Watch 2Wordiest

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Word Watch: A Code Switch Game Show
Copyright by June Marie Sobrito/Getty Images

Word Watch: A Code Switch Game Show

English is full of words and phrases with hidden racial backstories. Can you guess their histories? On part one of this two-part episode, we're unpacking the meaning behind "guru" and "boy."

Word Watch: A Code Switch Game Show

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