Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.

Most Recent Episodes

Oh So Now It's Racist?
LA Johnson

Oh So Now It's Racist?

This week, an argument about what to call President Trump's rhetoric. NPR editors Mark Memmott and Keith Woods offer different ideas for how news organizations should try to stay credible.

Oh So Now It's Racist?

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The Return Of Race Science

Angela Saini Henrietta Garden hide caption

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Henrietta Garden

The Return Of Race Science

In the 19th century it was mainstream science to believe in a racial hierarchy. But after WWII, the scientific world turned its back on eugenics and the study of racial difference. We speak to author Angela Saini, who says that race science is back.

The Return Of Race Science

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America's Concentration Camps?

Children and workers are seen at a tent encampment recently built near the Tornillo Port of Entry in Tornillo, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

America's Concentration Camps?

There's a debate over what to call the facilities holding migrant asylum seekers at the southern border. We revisit an earlier controversy to help make sense of it.

America's Concentration Camps?

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Some Of The People Knew Magic

Installation views, Nobody Promised Your Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall. Courtesy of Jonathan Dorado/Brooklyn Museum hide caption

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Courtesy of Jonathan Dorado/Brooklyn Museum

Some Of The People Knew Magic

Fifty years after the Stonewall Uprising, queer and trans folks are uncovering hidden parts of LGBTQ+ history. A new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, "Nobody Promised You Tomorrow: Art 50 Years After Stonewall," features works from from queer artists of color who were born in the years after Stonewall. We talked to four of them.

Some Of The People Knew Magic

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Code Switch Book Club: Summer 2019

A few of the great books that our listeners recommend for summer reading. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

Code Switch Book Club: Summer 2019

Our listeners suggestions include American history, compelling fiction, a few memoirs—and Jane Austen, re-imagined with brown people.

Code Switch Book Club: Summer 2019

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E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i

Kealiʻi Clarke graduated from Ke Kula 'O Nawahiokalani'opu'u, a Hawaiian language-medium school, in 2002. Now he works there. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i

Every two weeks a language dies with its last speaker. That was the fate of Hawaiian, until a group of second-language learners put up a fight and declared, "E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i" (The Hawaiian Language Shall Live!!!)

E Ola Ka 'Olelo Hawai'i

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The Original 'Welfare Queen'

Linda Taylor in 1944 Puget Sound Regional Archives hide caption

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Puget Sound Regional Archives

The Original 'Welfare Queen'

It's a pernicious stereotype, but it was coined in reference to a real woman named Linda Taylor. But her misdeeds were far more numerous and darker than welfare fraud. This week: how politicians used one outlier's story to turn the public against government programs for the poor.

The Original 'Welfare Queen'

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Salt Fat Acid Race

Samin Nosrat, author of the cookbook Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking. Shereen Marisol Meraji hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji

Salt Fat Acid Race

Samin Nosrat is an award-winning chef, cookbook author, and star of the Netflix series Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat. She's also an Iranian American woman trying to represent two cultures that are often perceived as being at odds with each other.

Salt Fat Acid Race

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Dispatches From The Schoolyard

English teacher Shehtaz Huq and the eighth-graders at Bronx Prep Middle School behind the winning podcast — Sssh! Periods. Elissa Nadworny hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny

Dispatches From The Schoolyard

In middle school and high school, we're figuring out how to fit in and realizing that there are things about ourselves that we can't change — whether or not we want to. This week, we're turning the mic over to student podcasters, who told us about the big issues shaping their nascent identities.

Dispatches From The Schoolyard

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Anger: The Black Woman's 'Superpower'

Serena Williams of the U.S. screams in anger after missing a return from Roberta Vinci of Italy in their semi-final match at the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York, September 11, 2015. Gary Hershorn/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Corbis via Getty Images

Anger: The Black Woman's 'Superpower'

A Sapphire isn't only a jewel—it's also cultural shorthand for an angry black woman. In this episode, we look at where Sapphire was born, and how the stereotype continues to haunt black women, even successful, powerful ones.

Anger: The Black Woman's 'Superpower'

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