Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.

Most Recent Episodes

The Black Table In The Big Tent

Black Republicans are a rarity, but they reveal a lot about how American partisan politics work. Sam Octigan hide caption

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Sam Octigan

The Black Table In The Big Tent

Black Republicans are basically unicorns — they might just be the biggest outliers in American two-party politics. So who are these folks who've found a home in the GOP's lily-white big tent? And what can they teach us about the ways we all cast our ballots?

The Black Table In The Big Tent

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A Tale Of Two School Districts
Yasmine Gateau for NPR

A Tale Of Two School Districts

In many parts of the U.S., public school districts are just minutes apart, but have vastly different racial demographics — and receive vastly different funding. That's in part due to Milliken v. Bradley, a 1974 Supreme Court case that limited a powerful tool for school integration.

A Tale Of Two School Districts

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Searching For Punks

One of the few remaining copies of the romantic comedy, Punks (2000) Matt Collette/WNYC hide caption

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Matt Collette/WNYC

Searching For Punks

Once upon a time, Kai Wright saw a movie called "Punks." A romantic comedy about black gay men, it was like nothing he'd ever seen before. But then it disappeared.

Searching For Punks

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'20 And Odd. Negroes'

Engraving shows the arrival of a Dutch slave ship with a group of African slaves for sale, Jamestown, Virginia, 1619. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

'20 And Odd. Negroes'

In August of 1619, a British ship landed near Jamestown, Virginia with dozens of enslaved Africans — the first black people in the colonies that would be come the United States. Four hundred years later, some African Americans are still looking to Jamestown in search of home and a lost history.

'20 And Odd. Negroes'

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All That Glisters Is Not Gold
LA Johnson/NPR

All That Glisters Is Not Gold

It's a widely accepted truth: reading Shakespeare is good for you. But what should we do with all of the bigoted themes in his work? We talk to a group of high schoolers who put on the Merchant Of Venice as a way to interrogate anti-Semitism, and then we ask an expert if that's a good idea.

All That Glisters Is Not Gold

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Dora's Lasting Magic

Isabela Moner stars as Dora in Dora and the Lost City of Gold Vince Valitutti/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures hide caption

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Vince Valitutti/Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Dora's Lasting Magic

Nickelodeon's Dora The Explorer helped usher in a wave of multicultural children's programming in the U.S. Our friends at Latino USA tell the story of how the show pushed back against anti-immigrant rhetoric — and why Dora's character still matters.

Dora's Lasting Magic

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After The Cameras Leave

FERGUSON, MO - : A plaque in memory of teenager Mike Brown is embedded in the sidewalk near the Canfield Apartments where Mike Brown killed. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

After The Cameras Leave

Five years ago, the death of an unarmed black teenager brought the town of Ferguson, Mo. to the center of a national conversation about policing in black communities. Since then, what's changed, if anything, in Ferguson?

After The Cameras Leave

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Puerto Ricans Stand Up

Demonstrators in San Juan, Puerto Rico march on Las Americas highway demanding the resignation of governor Ricardo Rossello. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Puerto Ricans Stand Up

It took less than two weeks for Puerto Ricans to topple their governor following the publication of unsavory private text messages. We tell the story of how small protests evolved into a political uprising unlike anything the island had ever seen.

Puerto Ricans Stand Up

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Chicago's Red Summer

Armed National Guards and African American men standing on a sidewalk during the race riots in Chicago, Illinois, 1919. Jun Fujita/Courtesy of the Chicago History Museum hide caption

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Jun Fujita/Courtesy of the Chicago History Museum

Chicago's Red Summer

Almost exactly 100 years ago, race riots broke out all across the United States. The Red Summer, as it came to be known, occurred in more than two dozen cities across the nation, including Chicago, where black soldiers returning home from World War I refused to be treated as second class citizens.

Chicago's Red Summer

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Oh So Now It's Racist?
LA Johnson

Oh So Now It's Racist?

This week, an argument about what to call President Trump's rhetoric. NPR editors Mark Memmott and Keith Woods offer different ideas for how news organizations should try to stay credible.

Oh So Now It's Racist?

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