Code Switch Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.
Code Switch
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We're all journalists of color, and this isn't just the work we do. It's the lives we lead. Sometimes, we'll make you laugh. Other times, you'll get uncomfortable. But we'll always be unflinchingly honest and empathetic. Come mix it up with us.More from Code Switch »

Most Recent Episodes

Twenty-First Century Blackface

Racist impersonations of black people have been used as entertainment for hundreds of years. Chaloner Woods/Getty Images hide caption

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Chaloner Woods/Getty Images

Twenty-First Century Blackface

We have one story of how blackface was alive and well on network television in Colombia until 2015.

Twenty-First Century Blackface

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What We Inherit

Sam Oozevaseuk Schimmel, 18, has grown up in both Alaska and Washington state. He is an advocate for Alaska Native youth. Kiliii Yuyan/Kiliii Yuyan for NPR hide caption

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Kiliii Yuyan/Kiliii Yuyan for NPR

What We Inherit

On this episode, the story of one family's struggle to end a toxic cycle of inter-generational trauma from forced assimilation. Getting back to their Native Alaskan cultural traditions is key.

What We Inherit

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A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

Members of the Detroit Lions take a knee during the playing of the national anthem prior to the start of the game at Ford Field on September 24, 2017 in Detroit, Michigan. Rey Del Rio/Getty Images hide caption

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Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

Last week, the NFL announced a new policy to penalize players who kneel during the national anthem. The announcement drew fresh attention to the century-old tightrope that outspoken black athletes — from Floyd Patterson to Rose Robinson to Colin Kaepernick – have had to walk in order to compete and live by their principles.

A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

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Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

Tensions have risen around Santa Fe's annual conquistador pageant, known as La Entrada. Zeke Peña hide caption

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Zeke Peña

Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

Hispanos have lived side by side the Pueblo people for centuries—mixing cultures, identities and even bloodlines. But recently, tensions have risen among the two populations over Santa Fe's annual conquistador pageant, known as La Entrada, which celebrates the arrival of the Spanish.

Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

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What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

Negrete's son Isaiah, showing off one of the many tattoos his dad inked. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

Black-and-gray tattoos have become increasingly popular over the last four decades. But many people don't realize that the style has its roots in Chicano art, Catholic imagery and "prison ingenuity." (Yes, they were called Prison-Style tattoos for a reason.) Freddy Negrete, a pioneer in the industry, started tattooing fellow inmates in the early 1970s. And while he's no longer tatting people up with guitar strings and ballpoint pens, he's still using some of the same techniques he mastered back in the day.

What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

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Tough Questions For The World's Toughest Job
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Tough Questions For The World's Toughest Job

Mother's Day is coming up, so we're taking on your most difficult questions around parenting. We'll talk about choosing a school, raising bilingual children, modeling gender identity, and what to do if your kid's afraid of black people.

Tough Questions For The World's Toughest Job

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Code Switch Census Watch 2020

The Census bureau challenges — and in some ways, helps define — how Americans of all stripes identify. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Code Switch Census Watch 2020

We've said it before: The U.S. Census is way more than cold, hard data. It informs what we call ourselves and how we're represented. On this episode, we explore the controversial citizenship question that the Trump administration added to the 2020 census. We also talk about how the U.S. Census helped create the 'Hispanic' label.

Code Switch Census Watch 2020

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It's Bigger Than The Ban

STERLING, VA - DECEMBER 11: U.S. Venture Scout Hidayah Martinez Jaka says the Pledge of Allegiance before remarks by Democratic presidential candidate Martin O'Malley. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

It's Bigger Than The Ban

Muslims make up a little over one percent of the U.S. population, but they seem to take up an outsized space in the American imagination. On this episode we explore why that is.

It's Bigger Than The Ban

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Members of Whose Tribe?

A stained glass window in the Eldridge Street Synagogue Museum. (Photo by: Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images) Jeff Greenberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Getty Images

Members of Whose Tribe?

Today, Americans tend to think of Jewish people as white folks, but it wasn't always that way. On this episode, we dig into the complex role Jewish identity has played in America's racial story — especially now, when anti-Semitism is on the rise.

Members of Whose Tribe?

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Location! Location! Location!

Martin Luther King Blvd. Kara Frame and Marcie LaCerte hide caption

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Kara Frame and Marcie LaCerte

Location! Location! Location!

It's the force that animates so much of what we cover on Code Switch. And on the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, we take a look at some ways residential segregation is still shaping the ways we live. We head to a border with an ironic name , before dropping in on a movement to remap parts of the South.

Location! Location! Location!

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