What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

Negrete's son Isaiah, showing off one of the many tattoos his dad inked. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

Black-and-gray tattoos have become increasingly popular over the last four decades. But many people don't realize that the style has its roots in Chicano art, Catholic imagery and "prison ingenuity." (Yes, they were called Prison-Style tattoos for a reason.) Freddy Negrete, a pioneer in the industry, started tattooing fellow inmates in the early 1970s. And while he's no longer tatting people up with guitar strings and ballpoint pens, he's still using some of the same techniques he mastered back in the day.

What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

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Tough Questions For The World's Toughest Job
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Tough Questions For The World's Toughest Job

Mother's Day is coming up, so we're taking on your most difficult questions around parenting. We'll talk about choosing a school, raising bilingual children, modeling gender identity, and what to do if your kid's afraid of black people.

Tough Questions For The World's Toughest Job

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Code Switch Census Watch 2020

The Census bureau challenges — and in some ways, helps define — how Americans of all stripes identify. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

Code Switch Census Watch 2020

We've said it before: The U.S. Census is way more than cold, hard data. It informs what we call ourselves and how we're represented. On this episode, we explore the controversial citizenship question that the Trump administration added to the 2020 census. We also talk about how the U.S. Census helped create the 'Hispanic' label.

Code Switch Census Watch 2020

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It's Bigger Than The Ban

STERLING, VA - DECEMBER 11: U.S. Venture Scout Hidayah Martinez Jaka says the Pledge of Allegiance before remarks by Democratic presidential candidate Martin O'Malley. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

It's Bigger Than The Ban

Muslims make up a little over one percent of the U.S. population, but they seem to take up an outsized space in the American imagination. On this episode we explore why that is.

It's Bigger Than The Ban

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Members of Whose Tribe?

A stained glass window in the Eldridge Street Synagogue Museum. (Photo by: Jeffrey Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images) Jeff Greenberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Members of Whose Tribe?

Today, Americans tend to think of Jewish people as white folks, but it wasn't always that way. On this episode, we dig into the complex role Jewish identity has played in America's racial story — especially now, when anti-Semitism is on the rise.

Members of Whose Tribe?

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Location! Location! Location!

Martin Luther King Blvd. Kara Frame and Marcie LaCerte hide caption

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Kara Frame and Marcie LaCerte

Location! Location! Location!

It's the force that animates so much of what we cover on Code Switch. And on the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, we take a look at some ways residential segregation is still shaping the ways we live. We head to a border with an ironic name , before dropping in on a movement to remap parts of the South.

Location! Location! Location!

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The Road To The Promised Land, 50 Years Later

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., addresses some 2,000 people on the eve of his death, giving the speech "I've been to the mountaintop." Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

The Road To The Promised Land, 50 Years Later

Fifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot and killed in Memphis, Tenn. This week, we have two stories about the aftermath of his death. The first takes us to Memphis to remember King's final days. The second brings us to Oakland, Calif., where King's assassination "transformed the position of the Black Panther Party overnight."

The Road To The Promised Land, 50 Years Later

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Amara La Negra: Too Black To Be Latina? Too Latina To Be Black?

Amara La Negra at Build Studio on February 7, 2018 in New York City. Mike Pont/Getty Images hide caption

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Amara La Negra: Too Black To Be Latina? Too Latina To Be Black?

People are constantly telling Amara La Negra that she doesn't fit anywhere. Sometimes, she's "too black to be Latina." Other times, she's "too Latina to be black." But Amara says afro-Latinas aren't rare and they're no cause for confusion — they're just in dire need of more representation.

Amara La Negra: Too Black To Be Latina? Too Latina To Be Black?

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The Madness Of March

College athletes during the second round of the 2018 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Viejas Arena on March 18, 2018 in San Diego, Ca. The Clemson Tigers won 84-53. Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images

The Madness Of March

The NCAA men's basketball tournament is going on right now and will bring in hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue. The coaches and commissioners who benefit are overwhelmingly white. The players on the court are MOSTLY black. So what, if anything, are those players owed?

The Madness Of March

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Who Is 'Us,' Anyway?

A performance during the Power 106 Cali Christmas at the Gibson Ampitheater on December 16, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. Angela Weiss/Getty Images hide caption

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Who Is 'Us,' Anyway?

"Shouldn't you help out your own community first?" That's the question we're exploring this week via our play-cousins at Latino USA. A black celebrity is criticized for helping a Latino immigrant. On this episode, that celebrity makes his case.

Who Is 'Us,' Anyway?

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Searching For A Home After Hate

Sunayana Dumala with her late husband, Srinivas Kutchibhotla. Courtesy of Sunayana Dumala hide caption

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Courtesy of Sunayana Dumala

Searching For A Home After Hate

In February 2017, Srinivas Kutchibhotla fell victim to an alleged hate crime. In the aftermath, his widow, Sunayana Dumala, had her life and her immigration status thrown into question. Now, she's trying to figure out what it means to stay — and find community — in the small Kansas town where her husband was killed.

Searching For A Home After Hate

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A House Divided By Immigration Status

Miriam, Abigail and Joseventura Gonzalez are all siblings, living together under one roof. And they all have different immigration statuses. Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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A House Divided By Immigration Status

All four of the Gonzalez kids grew up under one roof, in Los Angeles, Calif. But when the oldest was in middle school, she realized that she and her siblings might have drastically different lives. That's because she comes from a mixed-status family, where some members are free to work, and others are constrained by the fear of deportation.

A House Divided By Immigration Status

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Throw Some Respeck On My Name
Jet Magazine

Throw Some Respeck On My Name

It's Alabama, 1963. A black woman stands before a judge, but she refuses to acknowledge him until he addresses her by an honorific given to white women: "Miss." On this week's episode, we revisit the forgotten story of Mary Hamilton, a Freedom Rider who struck a blow against a pervasive form of disrespect.

Throw Some Respeck On My Name

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Feelings, Finances And Fetishes: Love Is A Racial Battlefield

What is love? Baby don't hurt me. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Feelings, Finances And Fetishes: Love Is A Racial Battlefield

To get y'all in the mood for Valentine's Day, we're exploring some of our juiciest listener love questions. Should your race and gender affect how much you pay into a relationship? What's the difference between a preference and a fetish? And what's the quickest way for black women to find love?

Feelings, Finances And Fetishes: Love Is A Racial Battlefield

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It's Not Just About The Blood

Noelle Garcia with her parents. Courtesy of Noelle Garcia hide caption

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Courtesy of Noelle Garcia

It's Not Just About The Blood

If you're Native American, who or what gets to define your identity? We dive into an old system intended to measure the amount of "Indian blood" a person has. We hear from two families about how they've come to understand their own Native identities and how they'll pass that on to future generations.

It's Not Just About The Blood

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The State Of Our Union Is...Uh, How Much Time You Got?

On the occasion of President Trump's first State of the Union speech, we're looking at where things stand on civil rights at the Justice Department, the state of play for the country's white nationalist fringe, and how Puerto Rico is faring as the federal government prepares to cut off its emergency aid.

The State Of Our Union Is...Uh, How Much Time You Got?

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The 'R-Word' In The Age Of Trump

People stage a protest against U.S President Donald Trump in San Francisco. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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The 'R-Word' In The Age Of Trump

When Donald Trump allegedly referred to Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries as "shitholes," we called his comments r-...rr-...really really vulgar. Why were we so afraid to call them racist?

The 'R-Word' In The Age Of Trump

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A Racial Impostor Epidemic

"Racial imposter syndrome" is definitely "a thing," for many people. Shereen and Gene hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Social scientists weigh in the need basic need for belonging. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

A Racial Impostor Epidemic

Our episode about multi-racial people and their search for identity struck a nerve. Now we're asking, "What other stories do you want to hear?"

A Racial Impostor Epidemic

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This Racism Is Killing Me Inside

Wanda Irving holds her granddaughter, Soleil, in front of a portrait of Soleil's mother, Shalon, at her home in Sandy Springs, Ga. Wanda is raising Soleil since Shalon died of complications due to hypertension a few weeks after giving birth. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

This Racism Is Killing Me Inside

On this weeks episode we hear the story of Shalon Irving, who passed away after giving birth to her daughter. Black women in the United States are 243 percent more likely than white women to die of pregnancy- or childbirth-related causes. There's evidence that shows this gap is caused by the "weathering" effects of racism.

This Racism Is Killing Me Inside

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Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 2

Members of the Houston Texans kneel during the national anthem before the game at CenturyLink Field on Oct. 29, 2017 in Seattle. Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images

Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 2

This week, Gene Demby talks with ESPN's Jemele Hill. The SportsCenter anchor discusses becoming a lightning rod in the culture wars and the flimsy partition between politics and sports. And we'll look ahead to a year of looking back: the 50th anniversaries of the tumultuous events of 1968.

Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 2

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Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 1

White nationalists exchange insults with counter-protesters during the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Before We Give 2017 The Middle Finger, Part 1

In this episode: lessons learned post-Charlottesville, the Latinas who said "me, too" before it went viral, race-and-rep wins in pop-culture and some of this year's real-life losses. You'll yell, you'll cheer, you'll shed a tear.

Black Atheists, White Santas, And A Feast For The Deceased

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Black Atheists, White Santas, And A Feast For The Deceased

We're answering your holiday race questions: Why do we still think of Santa as white? Are POCs responsible for calling-out the racism at holiday parties? How do you tell your black family you're a non-believer? And, can you resurrect a dead family tradition?

Black Atheists, White Santas, And A Feast For The Deceased

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With Dope, There's High Hope

As the burgeoning marijuana industry booms, who is reaping the benefits, and who is being left behind? Chelsea Beck hide caption

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Chelsea Beck

With Dope, There's High Hope

As of January 1, it will be legal to sell recreational cannabis in California. But as the legal weed market gains traction, people of color who were targeted by the drug war are being left out of the green rush. This week, we revisit the history of marijuana in the U.S. ― and how its criminalization has everything to do with race.

With Dope, There's High Hope

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17,000 Islands, 700 Languages, And A Superhero

Alldo Fellix J, 26 Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

17,000 Islands, 700 Languages, And A Superhero

Indonesia is one of the most ethnically diverse countries on Earth. And while that pluralism is embraced in the country's founding documents, its ethnic Chinese minority has been persecuted for generations. NPR's Ari Shapiro tells the story of a young Indonesian of Chinese descent, who is trying to navigate his country's roiling tensions.

17,000 Islands, 700 Languages, And A Superhero

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