What So Proudly We Hail

The East L.A. band Las Cafeteras is known for a version of "La Bamba" that mixes traditional Mexican son jarocho with hip-hop. Jessica Pons for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Pons for NPR

What So Proudly We Hail

So "The Star-Spangled Banner" is kind of a mess: notoriously tough to sing and with some weird stanzas about slavery. This week, we're looking at two of the country's other anthems with their own messy histories to find out what those songs tell us about American ideals.

What So Proudly We Hail

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Our Homeland Is Each Other

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Our Homeland Is Each Other

This week, we're handing the mic over to transracial adoptees. They told us what they think is missing from mainstream narratives about adoption, and how being an adoptee is an identity unto itself.

Our Homeland Is Each Other

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Deja Vu All Over Again

From left: Anita Hill, Brett Kavanaugh, Christine Blasey-Ford, and Clarence Thomas. Jennifer Law/Andrew Harnik/Jim Bourg/J. David Ake/Getty Images hide caption

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Jennifer Law/Andrew Harnik/Jim Bourg/J. David Ake/Getty Images

Deja Vu All Over Again

Decades before Christine Blasey-Ford testified before lawmakers, the country had another reckoning with sexual misconduct set against the backdrop of a Supreme Court nomination. This week: what we have — and haven't — learned in the years since the Anita Hill hearings about identity politics, sexual harassment and power.

Deja Vu All Over Again

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#CriticsSoWhite

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#CriticsSoWhite

The reckoning that is reshaping Hollywood is finally making its way to the critic's perch. Bilal Qureshi joins us to talk about exciting movies coming this fall, and who gets to judge.

#CriticsSoWhite

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Puerto Rico's Other Storm

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Puerto Rico's Other Storm

Long before Hurricane Maria devastated the territory, the threat of financial disaster loomed over Puerto Rico. Now, an old, bitter struggle over who gets to chart the islands' economic future is upending life for everyday Puerto Ricans trying to pick up the pieces.

Puerto Rico's Other Storm

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Ask Code Switch: School Daze

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Jens Magnusson/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Ask Code Switch: School Daze

For better or worse, classrooms have always been a site where our country's racial issues get worked out — whether its integration, busing, learning about this country's sordid racial history. On today's Ask Code Switch, we're talking about fitting in, standing out, and standing up for what you believe in.

Ask Code Switch: School Daze

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Update: Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

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Update: Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

In a unanimous decision, India's Supreme Court struck down a long-standing ban on gay sex. In light of this, we're revisiting an episode about same-sex love and dating apps for South Asians.

Update: Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

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Stuck Off The Realness

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Stuck Off The Realness

Prodigy made up half of the hugely influential hip-hop duo Mobb Deep, but spent his life in excruciating pain due to a debilitating disease called sickle cell anemia. On this episode, the hosts of WNYC's The Realness podcast chronicle Prodigy's struggle with the disease, share the story of how the disease was discovered, and explain how black revolutionaries pressed their communities (and the President of the United States) to do something about it.

Stuck Off The Realness

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So What If He Said It?

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So What If He Said It?

In recent weeks, rumors of a recording of President Trump using the N-Word have resurfaced. But critics have been describing Trump as racist for years. So, if this tape were to exist, would it even matter?

So What If He Said It?

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Live From Birmingham...It's Code Switch!

Code Switch, live from the Alys Stephens center at the University Of Alabama at Birmingham. Beau Gustafson/WBHM hide caption

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Live From Birmingham...It's Code Switch!

Shereen and Gene head to Alabama to talk about race in the American South. Mayor Randall Woodfin of Birmingham talks about growing up in the shadow of his city's history. The poet Ashley M. Jones shares how she learned to love her hometown. And Gigi Douban of WBHM takes on some tough listener questions about race in the Magic City.

Live From Birmingham...It's Code Switch!

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Behind The Lies My Teacher Told Me
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Behind The Lies My Teacher Told Me

It's a battle that's endured throughout so much of American history: what gets written into our textbooks. Today we tag in NPR education correspondent Anya Kamenetz, and hear from author James Loewen about the book, Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong.

Behind The Lies My Teacher Told Me

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Talk American
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Talk American

What is the "Standard American Accent"? Where is it from? And what does it mean if you don't have it? Code Switch goes on a trip to the Midwest to find out.

Talk American

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Word Watch, The Sequel: 2Watch 2Wordiest
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Word Watch, The Sequel: 2Watch 2Wordiest

We're back this week with the grand finale of the Word Watch Game Show! First, we'll uncover the messy history of the term "white trash." Then we'll get into a ditty that signals ... anything "Asian." Come play with us!

Word Watch, The Sequel: 2Watch 2Wordiest

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Word Watch: A Code Switch Game Show
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Word Watch: A Code Switch Game Show

English is full of words and phrases with hidden racial backstories. Can you guess their histories? On part one of this two-part episode, we're unpacking the meaning behind "guru" and "boy."

Word Watch: A Code Switch Game Show

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Rap On Trial

Olutosin Oduwole in 2017, at the Revolt music studio in Los Angeles. Yemi Oduwole/Olutosin Oduwole hide caption

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Yemi Oduwole/Olutosin Oduwole

Rap On Trial

Olutosin Oduwole was a college student and aspiring hip hop star when he was charged with "attempting to make a terrorist threat." Did public perceptions of rap music play a role? This week we're tagging in our friends at Hidden Brain to tell this story.

Rap On Trial

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Word Up
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Word Up

Since 1992, the study known as "The 30 Million Word Gap" has, with unusual power, shaped the way educators, parents and policymakers think about educating poor children. NPR education correspondent Anya Kamenetz joins us to talk about what it gets right, and what it misses.

Word Up

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Code Switch's Summer Vacation

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Getty Images

Code Switch's Summer Vacation

We're going on a trip, and we're taking you with us! From the peak of Mount Denali to the beaches of Queens, we're talking camp, suntans and our favorite summer jams.

Code Switch's Summer Vacation

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Immigration Nation

People protest outside of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. on June 26, 2018 — the day that the Court upheld President Trump's travel ban on travelers from five mostly Muslim countries. Mandel Ngan/Getty Images hide caption

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Immigration Nation

Anti-immigrant sentiment is on the rise, and the prospect of mass deportation is in the news. But as much as this seems like a unique moment in history, in many ways, it's history repeating itself.

Immigration Nation

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Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

Finding love online isn't as easy as it might seem. Especially for same-sex couples. Marie Bertrand/Getty Images hide caption

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Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

Online matchmaking sites are making it easier than ever for couples seeking an arranged marriage to meet. Well...not all couples.

Looking For Marriage In All The Wrong Places

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Twenty-First Century Blackface

Racist impersonations of black people have been used as entertainment for hundreds of years. Chaloner Woods/Getty Images hide caption

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Twenty-First Century Blackface

We have one story of how blackface was alive and well on network television in Colombia until 2015.

Twenty-First Century Blackface

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What We Inherit

Sam Oozevaseuk Schimmel, 18, has grown up in both Alaska and Washington state. He is an advocate for Alaska Native youth. Kiliii Yuyan/Kiliii Yuyan for NPR hide caption

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Kiliii Yuyan/Kiliii Yuyan for NPR

What We Inherit

On this episode, the story of one family's struggle to end a toxic cycle of inter-generational trauma from forced assimilation. Getting back to their Native Alaskan cultural traditions is key.

What We Inherit

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A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

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A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

Last week, the NFL announced a new policy to penalize players who kneel during the national anthem. The announcement drew fresh attention to the century-old tightrope that outspoken black athletes — from Floyd Patterson to Rose Robinson to Colin Kaepernick – have had to walk in order to compete and live by their principles.

A Thousand Ways To Kneel And Kiss The Ground

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Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

Tensions have risen around Santa Fe's annual conquistador pageant, known as La Entrada. Zeke Peña hide caption

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Zeke Peña

Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

Hispanos have lived side by side the Pueblo people for centuries—mixing cultures, identities and even bloodlines. But recently, tensions have risen among the two populations over Santa Fe's annual conquistador pageant, known as La Entrada, which celebrates the arrival of the Spanish.

Of Bloodlines and Conquistadors

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What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

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What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

Black-and-gray tattoos have become increasingly popular over the last four decades. But many people don't realize that the style has its roots in Chicano art, Catholic imagery and "prison ingenuity." (Yes, they were called Prison-Style tattoos for a reason.) Freddy Negrete, a pioneer in the industry, started tattooing fellow inmates in the early 1970s. And while he's no longer tatting people up with guitar strings and ballpoint pens, he's still using some of the same techniques he mastered back in the day.

What's Black And Gray And Inked All Over?

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