Code Switch What's CODE SWITCH? It's the fearless conversations about race that you've been waiting for. Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race with empathy and humor. We explore how race affects every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, food and everything in between. This podcast makes all of us part of the conversation — because we're all part of the story. Code Switch was named Apple Podcasts' first-ever Show of the Year in 2020.
NPR Code Switch 2020
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

What's CODE SWITCH? It's the fearless conversations about race that you've been waiting for. Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race with empathy and humor. We explore how race affects every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, food and everything in between. This podcast makes all of us part of the conversation — because we're all part of the story. Code Switch was named Apple Podcasts' first-ever Show of the Year in 2020.

Most Recent Episodes

Kacen Callender, author of middle and young adult novels, including Felix Ever After and Hurricane Child. Ashley Cain hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Cain

The Dramatic Life Of The American Teenager

Kacen Callender started out as a kid in St. Thomas writing fan fiction. Today, they are the author of multiple middle grade and young adult novels full of empathy, learning, and a healthy dose of high school drama.

The Dramatic Life Of The American Teenager

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1040399538/1040401020" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
NPR

Who You Calling 'Hispanic'?

But seriously, who? Because while it is Hispanic Heritage Month, the notion of a multiracial, multinational, pan-ethnic identity called "Hispanic" is a relatively recent — and somewhat haphazard invention — in the United States. So on this episode, we're digging into how the term got created and why it continues to both unite and bewilder.

Who You Calling 'Hispanic'?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1039053932/1039453705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Isabel Seliger for NPR

The Making And Remaking Of Afghanistan

For two decades, many Americans have seen Afghanistan depicted primarily through the lens of war. But that's not the full story — not even close. Afghanistan has a long, rich, complex history and culture. A lot of it flies in the face of the images those of us in the U.S. are exposed to. So this week, our friends at Throughline are helping us understand the fuller story.

The Making And Remaking Of Afghanistan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1036700844/1036716320" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
NPR

The Lost Summer

Twenty years ago, during the dog days of summer , a fledgling journalist named Shereen Marisol Meraji — maybe you've heard of her? — headed to Durban, South Africa. Her mission: to report on a meeting of thousands of organizers and ambassadors gathered at a global conference on racism. The conference filled Shereen with hope and optimism — all of which would soon be wiped away.

The Lost Summer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1034920163/1035023304" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
NPR

The Folk Devil Made Me Do It

What moral panics reveal about the ongoing freakout over critical race theory in schools.

The Folk Devil Made Me Do It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1029775224/1033137163" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Seeing Ghosts, a memoir by Kat Chow. Grand Central Publishing hide caption

toggle caption
Grand Central Publishing

'Seeing Ghosts' Across Generations

Kat Chow was 13 when her mother died, and with that loss came profound and lasting questions about identity, family and history. In her memoir, Seeing Ghosts, the author and former Code Switch reporter explores how her mother's death has haunted her through the years, in ways that are profound, tragic and, sometimes, darkly hilarious.

'Seeing Ghosts' Across Generations

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1029896173/1030685486" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

High schoolers Ethan Lincoln, Kaylee King and Jamin Crow's podcast about their experiences subsistence hunting is a finalist in the NPR Student Podcast Challenge. The students are pictured here at the KYUK radio transmitter site in Bethel, Alaska. KYUK hide caption

toggle caption
KYUK

Who Runs The World? Kids.

OK, they're not all kids. But they're all students, they're all amazing, and frankly, we're concerned that they might be coming for our jobs. That's right — the Student Podcast Challenge is back, and this year, the stories are more powerful than ever.

Who Runs The World? Kids.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1028353571/1028546987" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
NPR

Care To Explain Yourself?

It's hot out, places are shutting down again, and things might just be feeling a little bit slow. So in the spirit of spicing things up, we wanted to give you all a question to fight about: How much context should you have to give when talking about race and culture? Is it better to explain every reference, or ask people to Google as they go? Comedian Hari Kondabolu joins us to hash it out.

Care To Explain Yourself?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1026507758/1026530402" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Nicole Xu for NPR

Violence That Doesn't Go Viral

We talk a lot on this show about people who have been killed by police officers. But there is so much police violence that falls short of being fatal, but forever alters the lives of the people on the business end of it. So this week, we're turning things over to the "On Our Watch" podcast, out of KQED and NPR's Investigations Team.

Violence That Doesn't Go Viral

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1024216591/1024229012" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Somebody's Daughter, by Ashley C. Ford. Flatiron hide caption

toggle caption
Flatiron

To Love And Not Forgive

For much of her childhood, Ashley Ford's father was incarcerated, and her mother struggled to raise her while grappling with her own upended life plans. In her new memoir, Somebody's Daughter, Ford looks at how her upbringing shaped her understanding of childhood, authority, forgiveness and freedom.

To Love And Not Forgive

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1020711720/1021415383" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
or search npr.org