Code Switch What's CODE SWITCH? It's the fearless conversations about race that you've been waiting for! Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race head-on. We explore how it impacts every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, sports and everything in between. This podcast makes ALL OF US part of the conversation — because we're all part of the story. "We're talking to people who have been marginalized and underrepresented for so long, who are so hungry to see themselves represented fully and with nuance and complexity," says Shereen Marisol Meraji, co-host of Code Switch, Apple Podcasts' first-ever Show of the Year for 2020. "People recognize that, because we had been having these conversations for so many years in advance, we're a trusted place where they could go to better understand all the stories about race filling up their newsfeeds and social channels." Their weekly podcast launched in 2016 but truly came into its own during this historic, transformative year, as Meraji and co-host Gene Demby examine issues of racial, ethnic, and cultural identity through frank one-on-one discussions and incisive non-fiction. In a year dominated by discourse about race, this indispensable show furthered them by providing powerful and timely insight, offering diverse and empathetic personal perspectives to a broad audience. "There are certain lenses that we are bringing into, both as journalists and the people that we're bringing to these stories," Demby says. "But also, we are specific people with specific fascinations and broad curiosity. If we're telling these stories, you should assume that they're going to look and sound like us."
NPR Code Switch 2020
NPR

Code Switch

From NPR

What's CODE SWITCH? It's the fearless conversations about race that you've been waiting for! Hosted by journalists of color, our podcast tackles the subject of race head-on. We explore how it impacts every part of society — from politics and pop culture to history, sports and everything in between. This podcast makes ALL OF US part of the conversation — because we're all part of the story. "We're talking to people who have been marginalized and underrepresented for so long, who are so hungry to see themselves represented fully and with nuance and complexity," says Shereen Marisol Meraji, co-host of Code Switch, Apple Podcasts' first-ever Show of the Year for 2020. "People recognize that, because we had been having these conversations for so many years in advance, we're a trusted place where they could go to better understand all the stories about race filling up their newsfeeds and social channels." Their weekly podcast launched in 2016 but truly came into its own during this historic, transformative year, as Meraji and co-host Gene Demby examine issues of racial, ethnic, and cultural identity through frank one-on-one discussions and incisive non-fiction. In a year dominated by discourse about race, this indispensable show furthered them by providing powerful and timely insight, offering diverse and empathetic personal perspectives to a broad audience. "There are certain lenses that we are bringing into, both as journalists and the people that we're bringing to these stories," Demby says. "But also, we are specific people with specific fascinations and broad curiosity. If we're telling these stories, you should assume that they're going to look and sound like us."

Most Recent Episodes

Dion MBD for NPR

Words Of Advice

Let's face it — we could all use some help right now. So today on the pod, we're looking at a few of our favorite questions about race and identity from our "Ask Code Switch" series. We're getting into food, relationships, money, language, friendship and more, so you know it's about to get a little messy (in the best way.)

Words Of Advice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/940547250/940690403" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Family tensions can bubble to the surface during the holidays, especially after a divisive election. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Fishel for NPR

Thank You, Next

It's Thanksgiving week, and like basically everything else about 2020, this holiday is on track to be...let's call it "different." But while the world has changed in innumerable ways this year, one thing that hasn't changed is that the country is still deeply politically divided.

Thank You, Next

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/938633514/938643368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

a photo collage of anti- and pro-Trump voters, with an elephant in the middle Tanganyika Zinzani for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Tanganyika Zinzani for NPR

The White Elephants In The Room

One of the biggest storylines from the 2020 presidential race has ... well, race at the center of it. If you paid attention to the stories about exit polling, you heard a lot of talk about how Latinx and Black voters showed up in bigger numbers this year than back in 2016. But on this week's episode, we also focus on a conversation that's not happening: The one about a group whose support for Donald Trump hasn't wavered. We're talking about the white vote, and in particular, white evangelical voters.

The White Elephants In The Room

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/935910276/936528272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Vice president-elect Kamala Harris, front center, with, from left, her grandfather, sister, mother and grandmother in 1972. Twitter/ @mayaharris_ hide caption

toggle caption
Twitter/ @mayaharris_

Claim Us If You're Famous

Kamala Harris is the vice president-elect, which marks an impressive list of firsts: woman in the White House; Black woman in the White House, Asian American in the White House; etc. Her Indian heritage has gotten much less attention than her Black identity, and in many ways, it has been complicated by her Black identity. On this episode, we look at what Harris's identities can tell us about dual-minority POCs, South Asian political representation in the U.S., and what it all means at the voting booth.

Claim Us If You're Famous

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/933631207/933738052" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Election workers load ballots into a sorting machine on Election Day at the King County Elections Office in Renton, Wash. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

We ... Don't Know Anything Yet

Election Day has come and gone, but we're still awhile away from knowing what the outcome will be. But while there's a lot we don't about the results, we do know that this election will tell us a lot about what our electorate looks like. With some help from our friends at NPR's politics podcast, we're looking at what happened, and waiting with bated breath to see what this portends for the future.

We ... Don't Know Anything Yet

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/931318730/931370876" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People line up to vote at the Gwinnett County Fairgrounds on October 30, 2020 in Lawrenceville, Georgia. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

An Historic Vote, Among Many

For a lot of reasons, the 2020 election feels historic. But in one important way, it's like so many elections throughout American history: Black and brown voters are being disproportionately prevented from casting their ballots. On this bonus episode, we're revisiting a conversation with Carol Anderson, author of One Person, No Vote, about what voter suppression has looked like throughout history.

An Historic Vote, Among Many

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/929669118/929720120" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Victor Samuel Martinez-Rivera, Fernanda Ruiz Martinez, Heber Toscano and Alejandro Vasquez are voting for president for the very first time. Eve Edelheit, Deanna Dent and Xueying Chang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eve Edelheit, Deanna Dent and Xueying Chang/NPR

The Latinx Vote Comes Of Age

For the first time in election history, Latinos are projected to be the second-largest voting demographic in the country. The reason? Gen Z Latinx voters, many of whom are casting a ballot for the first time in 2020. So we asked a bunch of them: Who do you plan to vote for? What issues do you care about? And what do you want the rest of the country to know about you?

The Latinx Vote Comes Of Age

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/926678395/928654242" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
LA Johnson/NPR/Getty

Is Trump Really That Racist?

We know his rhetoric has been described as boundary breaking when it comes to race. But U.S. presidents have been enacting racist policies forever. So as President Trump wraps up his first (and maybe only) term in office, we're asking: In terms of racism, how does he stack up to others when it comes to both words and deeds?

Is Trump Really That Racist?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/925385389/926039887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Photo illustration: LA Johnson/NPR; Photo: Saul Loeb/Getty Images

Let's Talk About Kamala Harris

The VP candidate's biography and heritage allow people to project all kinds of ideas onto her, and to see what they want to see. But Kamala Harris's identity is a very important lens into not just her own politics, but also Black politics around crime and punishment more broadly.

Let's Talk About Kamala Harris

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/923369723/923541871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rodney Carmichael and Sidney Madden of NPR's new podcast "Louder Than A Riot" Christian Cody and Joshua Kissi/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Christian Cody and Joshua Kissi/NPR

Hip-Hop, Mass Incarceration, And A Conspiracy Theory For The Ages

Why are hip-hop and mass incarceration so entangled in the U.S.? That's the question that our play cousins at NPR Music, Sidney Madden and Rodney Carmichael, set out to answer on their brand new podcast, Louder Than a Riot.

Hip-Hop, Mass Incarceration, And A Conspiracy Theory For The Ages

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/921869289/922002560" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Back To Top
or search npr.org