1A Listening to the news can feel like a journey. But 1A guides you beyond the headlines – and cuts through the noise. Let's get to the heart of the story, together – on 1A.

Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with 1A+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/the1a

1A

From NPR

Listening to the news can feel like a journey. But 1A guides you beyond the headlines – and cuts through the noise. Let's get to the heart of the story, together – on 1A.

Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with 1A+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/the1a

Most Recent Episodes

Stunt actor Victor Rodriguez performs during a show for tourists at Fort Bravo/Texas Hollywood in Almeria, Spain. Juan Naharro Gimenez/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Naharro Gimenez/Getty Images

Ask A Stunt Actor

Action and adventure films are big business. Last year, they accounted for more than half of box office earnings.

Ask A Stunt Actor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911244/1253176307" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Red Lobster logo displayed near a Red Lobster restaurant in Austin, Texas. Brandon Bell/Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Bell/Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The News Roundup for May 24, 2024

The final chapter of former president Donald Trump's hush money case is imminent.

The News Roundup for May 24, 2024

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911233/1253146714" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A sign for Massachusetts General Hospital. Jodi Hilton/Jodi Hilton/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jodi Hilton/Jodi Hilton/Getty Images

The Realities And Ethics Of Pig Organ Transplants In Humans

With CRISPR technology, scientists can edit pig genes to be more compatible with a human body, or at least that's the hope.

The Realities And Ethics Of Pig Organ Transplants In Humans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911227/1253053655" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A view of the atmosphere during the "Back to Black" Special Event at The West Hollywood EDITION in West Hollywood, California. Gonzalo Marroquin/Getty Images for Focus Features hide caption

toggle caption
Gonzalo Marroquin/Getty Images for Focus Features

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Back To Black' And Talks Biopics

Has someone ever asked you what "your story" is? For some, that question is a nightmare. Where do you begin? What parts are important? And are the parts you think are important, actually that crucial?

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Back To Black' And Talks Biopics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911216/1253013274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mike Rothman (R) and friends eat periodical cicadas they prepared as part of the Hot One's challenge at home in Hyattsville, Maryland. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

From Cicadas To Crickets, Insects As Cuisine

We recently did a show about the cicada double brood emergence. Billions of them are above ground this year. And the conversation... took a bit of a turn... towards whether they can be eaten. (They can.)

From Cicadas To Crickets, Insects As Cuisine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911209/1252774627" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

JIM WATSON AFP via Getty Images JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

'If You Can Keep It': Election Security In 2024

At 1A, when it comes to election coverage, we focus on the stakes, not the chatter.

'If You Can Keep It': Election Security In 2024

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911202/1252567757" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg testifies before the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee of House Appropriations Committee. Kent Nishimura/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kent Nishimura/Getty Images

The News Roundup For May 17, 2024

President Joe Biden and former President Donald Trump agreed on terms this week to face off in two televised debates before the general election this November.

The News Roundup For May 17, 2024

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911192/1252249437" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Dr. Meg Jay, Clinical Psychologist speaks onstage during Cosmopolitan Magazine's Fun Fearless Life Conference. Craig Barritt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Barritt/Getty Images

Best Of: Meg Jay Helps Us Navigate, Understand, And Review Our Twenties

What do you remember about being in your twenties? Maybe it was the best time of your life. Maybe it brought challenges that you had to learn to overcome as you entered adulthood.

Best Of: Meg Jay Helps Us Navigate, Understand, And Review Our Twenties

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911185/1251870891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A bottle of antidepressant pills named Effexor is shown photographed in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In Good Health: How We Live With Chronic Illness

Over half of adults in America live with a chronic illness.

In Good Health: How We Live With Chronic Illness

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911176/1251612739" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A periodical cicada, a member of Brood X, takes flight in the tree tops in Takoma Park, Maryland. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Scientific Method: The Cicadas Are Coming

What has red eyes, lives underground for years, and screeches all summer long? That would be cicadas. And they're here.

Scientific Method: The Cicadas Are Coming

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198911170/1251113683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
or search npr.org