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WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 11: U.S. President Donald Trump (2R) argues about border security with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) (R) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) as Vice President Mike Pence sits nearby in the Oval Office. Mark Wilson/Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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The Friday News Roundup for December 14, 2018

This week, Michael Cohen was sentenced to three years in prison. President Trump threatened to shut down the government over border wall funding. Senate members voted to end U.S. military support for Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen. And British Prime Minister Theresa May survived an attempted ouster by her own party.

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The Friday News Roundup for December 14, 2018

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A Double Standard For Discipline? Why Students Weren't Punished After A Nazi Salute

The city of Baraboo, Wisconsin made headlines after a photo went viral of high schoolers in front of the local courthouse giving a Nazi salute. A few weeks later, an anti-Semitic video and fliers surfaced.

What responsibilities do high schools have to punish hate speech? And when should students be old enough to know better?

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A Double Standard For Discipline? Why Students Weren't Punished After A Nazi Salute

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This bridge leading into the town of Virginia, Minnesota spans a frozen lake created by years of iron mining. Virginia is a mining town on the Iron Range in northern Minnesota. Amanda Williams hide caption

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Amanda Williams

Rhetoric And Reaction: The Trade War In Northern Minnesota

A NAFTA replacement. Brexit. Tariffs. A trade war. China. Many of us are insulated from the direct impact of trade disruptions, so it's easy to lose sight of what's at stake.

Today, we look at global trade through local eyes. Hear from miners in Northern Minnesota about what it feels like to live in a single-industry town, and how trade decisions in Washington are affecting them.

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Rhetoric And Reaction: The Trade War In Northern Minnesota

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OPA LOCKA, FL - DECEMBER 04: U.S. Postal service mail handler Barbara Lynn sorts boxes at the U.S. Postal service's Royal Palm Processing and Distribution Center. Joe Raedle/Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Miracle On Your Street: How The Post Office Handles Holidays

This week, the U.S. Postal Service will deliver nearly 200 million packages. It's an essential service — with some major challenges.

Is today's post office sustainable? Would you miss it if it shrank or went away? And if it is worth saving, how should we save it?

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Miracle On Your Street: How The Post Office Handles Holidays

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TOPSHOT - Employee Jeferson Deodata da Silva climbs a ladder at the Royal Portuguese Cabinet of Reading in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on November 19, 2018. CARL DE SOUZA/CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Do Get Your Hopes Up...Rocking Out With Hope Punk

The world can seem like a dark, scary place these days. But a new genre called Hope Punk reminds us to dream of a better tomorrow and fight for it.

How can we have hope in times of trouble? We discuss with makers of the art form that might make it possible.

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Do Get Your Hopes Up...Rocking Out With Hope Punk

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Yellow vests (Gilets jaunes) protesters block the road leading to the Frontignan oil depot in the south of France, as they demonstrate against the rise in fuel prices and the cost of living on December 3, 2018. PASCAL GUYOT/PASCAL GUYOT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Friday News Roundup for December 7, 2018

The nation mourns former President George H.W. Bush. Big announcements come from the Trump White House. Authorities in France brace for more riots. And world leaders meet in Poland to agree on how best to combat climate change.

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The Friday News Roundup for December 7, 2018

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Speaking Freely: The Future Of The First Amendment

The Supreme Court was founded with our Constitution back in 1789. But it only started making major rulings on the First Amendment about a century ago, after World War I.

With the free speech challenges of today, what should violate the First Amendment? How should we respond as a society? Who gets to decide what speech is amplified or buried on social platforms?

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Speaking Freely: The Future Of The First Amendment

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Why Did Police Departments Throw Out Rape Kits?

A new CNN report has discovered hundreds of rape kits destroyed. They were trashed before the statute of limitations expired, and most were never tested for DNA evidence.

How widespread is the destruction of rape kits? And can cases be prosecuted without this key piece of evidence?

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Why Did Police Departments Throw Out Rape Kits?

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The Art Of The Political Obituary And The State Funeral

Preparations continue for tomorrow's state funeral for President George H.W. Bush. As the nation mourns, we reflect on the way we memorialize former leaders.

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The Art Of The Political Obituary And The State Funeral

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(FromL) Models Martha Hunt, Lais Ribeiro, Josephine Skriver, Sara Sampaio, Stella Maxwell, and Romee Strijd walk the runway at the 2018 Victoria's Secret Fashion Show on November 8, 2018 at Pier 94 in New York City. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Victoria's Secret Laid Bare

Last night, ABC aired the Victoria's Secret Fashion Show. Some 50 models strutted down a New York runway in colorful bras, sky-high stilettos and many versions of the well-known angel wings.

What does Victoria's Secret — and the lingerie industry at large — tell us about femininity and gender? And how does the #MeToo movement play into all this?

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Victoria's Secret Laid Bare

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