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1A is home to the national conversation. Joshua Johnson hosts with great guests and frames the best debate in ways to make you think, share and engage.More from 1A »

Most Recent Episodes

Even public radio producers wear sneakers to work. Gabe Bullard/1A/WAMU hide caption

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Gabe Bullard/1A/WAMU

What Are Those? How Sneakers Conquered America's Feet

Whether you call them sneakers, joggers, or something else (sand shoes?), there's no denying the popularity of athletic footwear. With more than $30 billion in sales a year, it's clear not everyone who buys a fresh pair is playing sports. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

What Are Those? How Sneakers Conquered America's Feet

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Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Franchesca Ramsey. Hari Kondabolu photo by Mindy Tucker, Franchesca Ramsey photo by Erin Patrice O'Brien/Photographer hide caption

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Hari Kondabolu photo by Mindy Tucker, Franchesca Ramsey photo by Erin Patrice O'Brien/Photographer

Comedy For Social Change

Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Franchesca Ramsey want to make you laugh, but they also want to make you think and take action toward changing the world. Both have new projects: Kondabolu co-hosts a podcast called "Kondabolu Brothers" and Ramsey has a book out now called, "Well, That Escalated Quickly." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Comedy For Social Change

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President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable on immigration policy in California, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, on Wednesday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The News Roundup For May 18, 2018

This week we learned how the crossfire hurricane was born. That's the codename given to the Russia investigation. At the UN, Ambassador Nikki Haley blamed Hamas for violence surrounding the relocation of a U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, before walking out of the meeting as a Palestinian envoy spoke. And Kim Jong Un may walk away from a planned meeting with President Trump. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

The News Roundup For May 18, 2018

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Bringing home a baby can be a cause for celebration ... and a lot of work. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Paying Attention In The Postpartum Period

When a new baby comes home, there's a lot to pay attention to. So much so that the mother's needs are often overlooked. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Paying Attention In The Postpartum Period

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A technician opens a vessel containing women's frozen egg cells in Amsterdam. LEX VAN LIESHOUT/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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LEX VAN LIESHOUT/AFP/Getty Images

Why More Women Are Going For The Big Freeze

There are a lot of reasons a woman may want to delay having children. There are health risks, professional penalties, and many personal considerations. Many women who want to have children but who also want to wait are turning to oocyte cryopreservation, often called egg freezing. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Why More Women Are Going For The Big Freeze

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Demonstrators ask that women be given the chance to have equal pay as their male co-workers on March 14, 2017 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Work Left To Be Done: Why Working Motherhood (Still) Affects Wages

America's workforce has more than seventy million women: most of whom have kids at home. And two-out-of-every-five households have working moms as the main or sole breadwinner. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Work Left To Be Done: Why Working Motherhood (Still) Affects Wages

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Jada Pinkett Smith Shares The Secrets Of Motherhood

What does it mean to be a mother in the public eye? It means you have a platform and a lot of responsibility, should you choose to use it. Jada Pinkett Smith is using her platform to have a unique, intergenerational conversation with her daughter, Willow, and her mother, Adrienne Banfield-Norris.

Jada Pinkett Smith Shares The Secrets Of Motherhood

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The Push To Reverse America's Rising Maternal Mortality Rates

A mother giving birth in the U.S. is three times as likely to die as a mother in Britain or Canada. That's largely because of the disproportionate toll on African-American moms. How can we reverse this devastating trend? This episode is part of our weeklong series "Beyond Mother's Day." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

The Push To Reverse America's Rising Maternal Mortality Rates

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Tyra Banks Takes Her Mama's Advice

Nobody's perfect. It's a lesson supermodel and entrepreneur Tyra Banks learned early on from her mother, Carolyn London. The pair co-authored a book called "Perfect Is Boring," based on London's advice. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Tyra Banks Takes Her Mama's Advice

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Beyond Mother's Day

Today's the day we celebrate mothers and reflect on how they touch our lives every other day of the year. Moms are on our mind a lot at 1A, and we're paying homage all week long. Our series "Beyond Mother's Day" starts now, with you. We wanted to hear more about your moms. Here's what you told us.| Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Beyond Mother's Day

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