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1A is home to the national conversation. The show frames the best debates with great guests in ways to make you think, share and engage.

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Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

The News Roundup For January 22, 2021

"This raft of [executive] orders is trying to communicate to the public that this administration is going to take a more leading role in response to the pandemic," says The Washington Post's Shane Harris.

The News Roundup For January 22, 2021

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Joe Biden is sworn in as U.S. President as his wife Dr. Jill Biden looks on during his inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

The First Steps For The Biden Administration

"There was a lot on the president's plate on the first day. It's just the start in a flurry of executive orders," says Washington Post reporter Seung Min Kim.

The First Steps For The Biden Administration

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Members of the National Guard gather at a security checkpoint near the US Capitol, ahead of the 59th inaugural ceremony for President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris in Washington, DC. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

The Inauguration Of Joe Biden And Its Place In History

"I think the best president that would serve as an example for Biden might be Abraham Lincoln, who was facing a war... and used his second inaugural address to bring healing to the country. I think that in some ways Biden will have to do the same thing," says historian Kellie Carter Jackson.

The Inauguration Of Joe Biden And Its Place In History

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Young activists and their supporters hold signs as they march during a Global Climate Strike demonstration in 2019. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

How The Future Of America Is Thinking About Our Future

"We want to have this multigenerational move toward social justice, and it just feels like our leaders and the party aren't doing that," says 17-year-old Aiden Kohn-Murphy. He says it's difficult to feel like he's being represented by elected officials when many are over 70.

How The Future Of America Is Thinking About Our Future

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A person wearing a QAnon sweatshirt stands off against US Capitol police officers as officials tried to stop insurrectionists supporting President Donald Trump from entering the U.S. Capitol. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Eerie Theories: The Psychology Behind Conspiracy

Donald Trump did not win the presidential election last November. Why do so many people believe he did? We explore the psychology associated with conspiracy theories.

Eerie Theories: The Psychology Behind Conspiracy

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A member of the New York National Guard stands at a gate outside the U.S. Capitol the day after the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump for the second time in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The News Roundup for January 15, 2021

A week after a deadly attack on the U.S. Capitol, the House of Representatives voted to impeach the president for the second time. World leaders react to the news. The U.S. has labeled Yemen's Houthi movement as a foreign terrorist organization and Cuba is back on the list of state sponsors of terrorism. We talk about all those stories and more on the News Roundup.

The News Roundup for January 15, 2021

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A person experiencing homelessness sleeps on the street in Los Angeles, California. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images

America Couldn't Ease Homelessness Before The Pandemic. What Can We Do Now?

"The virus [is] causing people to lose their jobs and causing economic problems and these are the kinds of situations that lead to more homelessness," says Steve Berg, Vice President of the National Alliance to End Homelessness.

America Couldn't Ease Homelessness Before The Pandemic. What Can We Do Now?

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Facebook and Twitter have both banned President Trump after an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. YouTube has suspended his account for at least a week. DENIS CHARLET/DENIS CHARLET/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DENIS CHARLET/DENIS CHARLET/AFP via Getty Images

Big Tech, Speech And The President Of The United States

"The First Amendment, like all of the U.S. Constitution, applies only to government. It's a set of rules about what government can do to its citizens," says RonNell Andersen-Jones, professor of law at the University of Utah.

Big Tech, Speech And The President Of The United States

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A U.S. Capitol Police officer wears a mourning band over his badge following a police procession of the hearse carrying the casket of Brian Sicknick, U.S. Capitol Police Officer who died from injuries following the U.S. Capitol building siege in Washington, DC. Al Drago/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Getty Images

In America, Who Gets Policed And How?

"The fair and objective application of the law is what builds trust in our communities and in our neighborhoods. It's when police stray from this, that's when we see these fissures," says Frank Straub.

In America, Who Gets Policed And How?

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What's Next For Congress After The Attack On The Capitol?

Five people are dead after pro-Trump insurrectionists attacked the United States Capitol. Now, it's up to the country's elected leaders to steer what some Americans fear is a sinking ship.

What's Next For Congress After The Attack On The Capitol?

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