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Chicago Sun Times and Chicago Tribune newspapers are offered for sale in Chicago, Illinois. Getty Images hide caption

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What We Lose When We Lose Local News

A new investigation by The Atlantic looks into Alden Global Capital, the secretive hedge fund that's gutted newsroom staff and owns more than 200 papers across the country including The Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, and the New York Daily News.

What We Lose When We Lose Local News

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US singer and guitarist Dave Grohl of US rock band Foo Fighters performs onstage during the Rock in Rio festival at the Olympic Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Dave Grohl On Punk Rock, Nirvana, and Fatherhood

Dave Grohl's shadow looms large over the music industry. He's the founder of the Grammy-winning rock group Foo Fighters. And he was the drummer for the groundbreaking grunge band Nirvana.

Dave Grohl On Punk Rock, Nirvana, and Fatherhood

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The chimney of a coal fired power plant is seen in Hanchuan, Hubei province. Getty Images hide caption

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The News Roundup for October 15, 2021

The Biden Administration's investigation into the Jan. 6 insurrection is heating up. Former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen appeared before the committee to give testimony. Four other persons of interest have been subpoenaed this week and all have yet to appear.

The News Roundup for October 15, 2021

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Signage supporting NWSL players is seen during a game between the Los Angeles Galaxy and the Los Angeles FC at Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, California. Getty Images hide caption

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Allegations Of Harassment, Institutional Failures, And The NWSL

A major investigation by The Athletic has brought accusations of sexual and verbal harassment by coaches in the National Women's Soccer League to light.

Allegations Of Harassment, Institutional Failures, And The NWSL

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A pregnant woman receives a COVID-19 vaccine during a mass vaccination program in Indonesia. Getty Images hide caption

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Vaccines, Misinformation, And Pregnancy

The CDC is amping up its plea for pregnant people to get vaccinated.

Vaccines, Misinformation, And Pregnancy

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The U.K. charity Changing Faces recast some of movie's most famous heroes as people with facial differences for its campaign, "I Am Not Your Villain." Changing Faces hide caption

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Changing Faces

What Villains With Facial Differences Mean For People With Facial Differences

In the newest James Bond movie, "No Time to Die", the main villain in the film, Safin, has scars covering his face. This has been the case for many past Bond villains.

What Villains With Facial Differences Mean For People With Facial Differences

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The "Facebook"-logo is pictured on the sidelines of a press preview of the so-called "Facebook Innovation Hub" in Berlin. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Facebook Under Fire: The Whistleblower, The Outage, And The Future

Last week, whistleblower Frances Haugen testified before Congress about Facebook's problems.

Facebook Under Fire: The Whistleblower, The Outage, And The Future

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This picture taken in Moscow shows the US online social media and social networking service Facebook's logo (R), the US instant messaging software Whatsapp's logo (L) and the US social network Instagram's logo (C) on a smartphone screen. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

The News Roundup for October 08, 2021

A whistleblower has come forward to detail how Facebook's products "harm children, stoke division, and weaken democracy." Then, a worldwide outage of Facebook's products, including Instagram and WhatsApp, disrupted communication and business in multiple countries.

The News Roundup for October 08, 2021

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Season 2 of the podcast "This Land" follows Brackeen v. Haaland — and the impact of ICWA — as it moves through the courts. Crooked Media hide caption

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Crooked Media

The Indian Child Welfare Act Faces Its Biggest Challenge Yet

The Indian Child Welfare Act was signed into law following decades of U.S. policies aimed at forcibly assimilating Native children — including sending them to boarding schools.

The Indian Child Welfare Act Faces Its Biggest Challenge Yet

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U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) during a hearing before Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee of Senate Appropriations Committee at Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Getty Images hide caption

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Why The Debt Limit Is Looming Over The Infrastructure Bill And Social Policy Package

The four-month-long stalemate over the fate of two big bills in Congress continues. Progressives refuse to budge on infrastructure until there's movement on a social policy package. Party leaders say Oct. 31 is the new deadline to act on these bills.

Why The Debt Limit Is Looming Over The Infrastructure Bill And Social Policy Package

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