Emma Banker, Jessi McIrvin, and Valerie Sanchez record vocals in pop-up tents during choir class at Wenatchee High School in Wenatchee, Washington. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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Music Education In The Pandemic And Beyond

Teaching orchestra, choir or band virtually in a pandemic presents some unique challenges. Even with schools reopening, it's difficult to hold in-person band practice in a way that's safe and socially distant.

Music Education In The Pandemic And Beyond

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Surrounded by members of House Democratic leadership, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference about COVID-19 relief legislation in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Priced Out: The Federal Minimum Wage And Pandemic Childcare Credits

The latest COVID-19 relief plan recently passed the House and is on its way to the Senate. But the provision regarding an increase to the minimum wage and child allowance could prove a hurdle to the bill passing.

Priced Out: The Federal Minimum Wage And Pandemic Childcare Credits

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We're explaining the difference between the available COVID-19 vaccines. JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

Comparing COVID-19 Vaccines After A Conversation With Dr. Anthony Fauci

Johnson & Johnson's one-shot vaccine was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control over the weekend.

Comparing COVID-19 Vaccines After A Conversation With Dr. Anthony Fauci

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A Covax tag is displayed on a shipment of Covid-19 vaccines from the Covax global vaccination program, at the Kotoka International Airport in Accra. Ghana received the first shipment of COVID-19 vaccines from Covax, a global scheme to procure and distribute inoculations for free, as the world races to contain the pandemic. NIPAH DENNIS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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NIPAH DENNIS/AFP via Getty Images

The News Roundup For February 26, 2021

Over 500,000 people have died from COVID-19 in the United States. The Biden administration conducted its first known military operation, against Iranian-backed militias in Syria.

The News Roundup For February 26, 2021

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Police officers patrol in their car in Beverly Hills. CHRIS DELMAS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CHRIS DELMAS/AFP via Getty Images

Rooting Out Extremism In The Police

"We need to talk about increasing diversity in police forces," says Vida Johnson, law professor at Georgetown University.

Rooting Out Extremism In The Police

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A sign outside of a bar looks to draw customers in Manhattan in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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What We're Losing If More LGBTQ Nightlife Spaces Close

"For me, queer nightlife spaces have always been these places of possibility, of world-making, of learning to style yourself," says Madison Moore, professor of queer studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. What are queer bars and clubs doing to survive, and what happens to communities if they don't?

What We're Losing If More LGBTQ Nightlife Spaces Close

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The logo of Bitcoin digital currency is pictured on the front door of an ATM in Marseille, southern France. NICOLAS TUCAT/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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NICOLAS TUCAT/AFP via Getty Images

Cryptocurrency: What You Need To Know Now

Companies like MasterCard and Tesla are embracing cryptocurrency. But what does cryptocurrency's popularity mean for the U.S. dollar's global influence?

Cryptocurrency: What You Need To Know Now

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President Joe Biden says he'll commit to wiping $10,000 of student loan debt. But key Democrats are pushing for more. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

The Future Of Student Loan Forgiveness

"Many, many, many people have student loan debt, but might not have finished their degrees and therefore aren't reaping the benefits of a degree," says The Atlantic's Annie Lowrey.

The Future Of Student Loan Forgiveness

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Customers wait in line to enter Frontier Fiesta in Houston, Texas. A winter storm has caused power outages and water disruptions for many people in Texas and the surrounding area. THOMAS SHEA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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THOMAS SHEA/AFP via Getty Images

The News Roundup For February 19, 2021

Texas continues to deal with the aftermath of a winter storm that left millions without power and disrupted water service to the state. The Biden administration projects any American who wants the COVID-19 vaccine will be able to get one by the end of July. Meanwhile, protests in Myanmar continue, as well as the World Health Organization's vaccination efforts. We got to those stories and more on the News Roundup.

The News Roundup For February 19, 2021

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Transmission towers and power lines lead to a substation after a snowstorm in Fort Worth, Texas. Ron Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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What The Texas Snowstorm Tells Us About America's Energy Infrastructure

"The weather is playing a huge role in this situation. Our infrastructure isn't built to handle this much demand for heating under these conditions," says Joshua Rhodes, energy researcher at the University of Texas at Austin.

What The Texas Snowstorm Tells Us About America's Energy Infrastructure

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Anna Malaika Tubbs' new book is "The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped A Nation." Anna Malaika Tubbs hide caption

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Anna Malaika Tubbs

The Mothers Who Raised Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin

"I decided to focus on mothers because of this further erasure that happens to mothers. Motherhood is so overlooked," says Anna Malaika Tubbs, author of "The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped A Nation."

The Mothers Who Raised Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and James Baldwin

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A local newspaper the Richmond Free Press, with a front page featuring top Virginia state officials embroiled in controversies, sits for sale in a newsstand near the Virginia State Capitol in Richmond, Virginia. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Local Spotlight: The Power Of FOIA

"[FOIAs] are vital to my work...we've written dozens of stories in the past months alone, based on emails between public officials or reports from universities," says Andrea Gallo about the hundreds of public records requests she's filed during her years as a journalist.

Local Spotlight: The Power Of FOIA

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Delroy Lindo attends "The Good Fight" World Premiere at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City. Ben Gabbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Delroy Lindo On Spike Lee, Chadwick Boseman And 'Da 5 Bloods'

We talked with Delroy Lindo about his journey to becoming an actor, and about the character he portrays in his latest film, Da 5 Bloods.

Delroy Lindo On Spike Lee, Chadwick Boseman And 'Da 5 Bloods'

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1A Presents: 'Through The Cracks'

We're bringing you an episode of a podcast we love: "Through The Cracks," from WAMU and PRX. When 8-year-old Relisha Rudd disappeared from a homeless shelter in Washington, D.C. in 2014, nobody noticed. By the time police appeared at the homeless shelter where Relisha lived with her family, 18 days had passed since she'd been seen at school or in the shelter. On this episode: What happened in March 2014.

1A Presents: 'Through The Cracks'

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Filipino activists bang pots and pans as they take part in a global noise barrage rally against the coup in Myanmar on in Manila. These protests join those in the streets of Myanmar. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

The News Roundup For February 12, 2021

House impeachment managers have been making their case in the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump in the Senate. Can the former president's defense team now pull themselves back from a faltering start? Also, new guidance on masks.

The News Roundup For February 12, 2021

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Books sit on shelves in the Duke Humphrey's Library at the Bodleian Libraries in Oxford, England. Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The Stories Marginalized Writers Tell When They Don't Center Trauma

"There's a way in which when we're telling stories about marginalized groups, theres an expectation to lean into the traumas of that particular community, but I've found that I'm not interested in reading or writing those stories," says author Bryan Washington.

The Stories Marginalized Writers Tell When They Don't Center Trauma

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Zendaya Coleman stars as Marie in "Malcolm & Marie." The film was directed by Sam Levinson and also stars John David Washington. Steven Ferdman/Getty Images hide caption

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The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Malcolm & Marie'

This month, we saw "Malcolm & Marie." Many critics were not fans. We talked about why.

The 1A Movie Club Sees 'Malcolm & Marie'

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An article of impeachment for incitement of insurrection against President Donald Trump sits on a table at the U.S. Capitol. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

What's Ahead During Former President Donald Trump's Second Impeachment Trial

"The Constitution says there are really only two penalties from impeachment — the first of which is a removal from office and the second is another vote to bar someone from ever holding office ever again," says Presidential Historian Jeffrey Engel.

What's Ahead During Former President Donald Trump's Second Impeachment Trial

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True crime podcasts are incredibly popular. What's behind the obsession? Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Investigating Our Obsession With True Crime Podcasts

"There is no question that true crime and the genre have helped move cases forward. But I wouldn't be honest if I didn't say there were times when I just cringe," says Bill Thomas, co-host of "Mind Over Murder."

Investigating Our Obsession With True Crime Podcasts

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A porta-potty waits for eclipse campers at the rodeo grounds in Tetonia, Idaho. On Sunday afternoon, two tents were seen at the makeshift campground. Natalie Behring/Getty Images hide caption

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When You Gotta Go: The Public Bathroom Problem

"When public bathrooms are closed, there doesn't suddenly become no need to go," says author Lezlie Lowe.

When You Gotta Go: The Public Bathroom Problem

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Demonstrators take part in a march organized in support of farmers protesting against the central governments recent agricultural reforms in New Delhi. MONEY SHARMA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MONEY SHARMA/AFP via Getty Images

The News Roundup For February 05, 2021

"We're starting to see a pattern of curtailing free speech and this could send India down a dangerous path of suppression of freedom of speech and intolerance," says The National's Joyce Karam about the protests in India.

The News Roundup For February 05, 2021

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President Biden is in the White House. But that doesn't mean everyone who supported him in 2020 is excited about where he might take the party. What could the future of the Democratic Party look like? Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

The Future Of The Democratic Party

"Winning the Senate and the House require winning in moderate areas while also energizing the base. It's a tough thing for folks to square," says The New York Times' Astead Herndon.

The Future Of The Democratic Party

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Tablets suspected to be fentanyl are placed on a graph to measure their size at the Drug Enforcement Administration Northeast Regional Laboratory in New York. DON EMMERT/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DON EMMERT/AFP via Getty Images

How To Fight The Opioid Crisis In The Middle Of A Pandemic

In some parts of the country, overdose deaths are on track to outpace deaths from COVID-19. We talk about the need for renewed attention to America's opioid crisis.

How To Fight The Opioid Crisis In The Middle Of A Pandemic

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In December, more Americans than ever before during the pandemic reported that they are going hungry, according to Census Bureau data examined by The Washington Post. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

Dollars And Sense: Keeping America Fed In A Pandemic

"Hunger is not just an issue of inner cities or a certain demographic of people. Often, it is right next door. Children are the number one sufferers of hunger in America, it's important to remember that," says Nicole Lander of the Houston Food Bank.

Dollars And Sense: Keeping America Fed In A Pandemic

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