Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border

One of our goals on 1A is to act as a kind of national mirror — to reflect what's happening and ask what it says about us.

That's a question many Americans have been asking themselves about the Trump Administration's decision to separate families who try to cross the border.

A children's pediatrician who assists with migrant children talked about the long-term effects of toxic stress. An 80-year-old caller from Maine said she was headed to a protest in front of a lawmaker's office.

Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border

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The ACLU's Path Of Most Resistance

Membership in the American Civil Liberties Union has quadrupled since the election of President Donald Trump. The organization has filed about 150 lawsuits against the president and his administration and a third of those have been about immigration policy, according to Susan Herman, the ACLU's president.

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The ACLU's Path Of Most Resistance

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A 2-year-old Honduran asylum seeker cries as her mother is searched and detained near the U.S.-Mexico border on June 12 in McAllen, Texas. The asylum seekers had rafted across the Rio Grande River from Mexico and were detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents before being sent to a processing center for possible separation. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Is This America's Border Policy?

Nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their parents along the southern border in the past few weeks.

This controversial immigration policy continues to cause outrage among parents, psychologists and concerned citizens.

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Is This America's Border Policy?

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Deb Haaland could become the first Native American woman in Congress. AP hide caption

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AP

The News Roundup For June 15, 2018: Live From Salt Lake City

We have a special edition of the Friday News Roundup, live from KUER in Salt Lake City, Utah. We're joined by experts from the Mountain West to go through big questions from this week's news. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

The News Roundup For June 15, 2018: Live From Salt Lake City

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Rodeo And The Future Of The American West

There are around 650 professional rodeos held each year. It's a symbol of life in the West, but that life is changing with climate change and urbanization. According to the Wright family, a cross-generational rodeo powerhouse from Utah, rodeo is not an anachronism — it's the future of the West. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.

Rodeo And The Future Of The American West

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A composite image of fans of each of the 32 national teams participating in the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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The World Cup: Intrigue, Statecraft And Sports

The World Cup begins in Moscow this week and we found out the U.S. will co-host it in 2026 with Mexico and Canada. More people watch this tournament than any other sporting event.

But FIFA was the subject of a corruption scandal that became public in 2015. How could such a beloved sport involve so much wrongdoing?

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The World Cup: Intrigue, Statecraft And Sports

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Alain McLaughlin Photography Inc.

'Wait Wait' Host Peter Sagal Has The Most Interesting Life

Peter Sagal has an interesting life. He ran in the Boston Marathon in 2013 and finished minutes before the bombing. He has a writing credit on "Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights" and the Sasquatch horror movie "Savage." And he had dinner with Stormy Daniels in 2005. But we know him as the host of "Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!"

We talked with Peter about his life, how Bob Garfield from "On the Media" came up with the name of his show and why "Wait Wait" hasn't made the leap to television, even though they've tried ... three times.

'Wait Wait' Host Peter Sagal Has The Most Interesting Life

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Bruce Lee: The Life Of An Icon

Bruce Lee's body of work was relatively small, and he died before he experienced widespread fame or recognition. But films like "Enter The Dragon" left a legacy that changed American culture.

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Bruce Lee: The Life Of An Icon

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President Trump speaks alongside Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau during a meeting in the Oval Office at the White House in October. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

The News Roundup For June 8, 2018

Trade news dominated the headlines this week, as world leaders prepared for what could be an "awkward" G-7 summit, as President Trump meets with the leaders of nations stung by U.S. tariffs.

The president had a busy few days of meetings. He talked with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ahead of next week's summit in Singapore with North Korean leaders.

The week began, though, with primaries in several states as Democrats try to set themselves up to retake the House of Representatives in November.

These are only a few of the stories we got to in this week's News Roundup.

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The News Roundup For June 8, 2018

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Designer Kate Spade is seen in 2004 among handbags and shoes from her collection. Spade was found dead in her New York City apartment on Tuesday. She was 55. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

The Legacy Of Kate Spade

Fashion designer Kate Spade set trends for generations of women. Her work was timeless, colorful and fun. Her designs were appropriate for work but never sacrificed a sense of personality.

Spade was also one of only a few prominent women to lead her own line in the male-dominated fashion industry.

Spade was found dead on Tuesday, prompting many fans to talk about their first time buying a Kate Spade design.

We talked about her life and legacy. What made her designs so successful? How will fans remember her? And what are the hurdles for women in the fashion industry?

The Legacy Of Kate Spade

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Gabe Bullard | WAMU

Eric Holder On Political Boundaries

Former Attorney General Eric Holder is thinking about boundaries. He's leading an effort to change the way legislative boundaries are drawn. And he's also thinking about the boundaries of his former department, as President Trump's frustrations with current Attorney General Jeff Sessions. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Eric Holder On Political Boundaries

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Seymour Hersh Reports On A Life In Journalism

In his new book "Reporter: A Memoir," journalist Seymour Hersh covers his life story, with analysis of his profession thrown in. On the latter, he's not very sunny. "Yes, it's a mess," he writes about today's media landscape. "And there is no magic bullet, no savior in sight for the serious media." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Seymour Hersh Reports On A Life In Journalism

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President Donald Trump argues that his power to pardon would include even himself but says he doesn't need to use it because he's done nothing wrong. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The President's Pardon Power And The Law

Can the president obstruct justice? Can he pardon himself? A memo and tweet have put new interest on old questions of presidential power. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

The President's Pardon Power And The Law

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The News Roundup For June 1, 2018

This week, we learned President Trump asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reverse his recusal from the Russian investigation. The president also issued a pardon for conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza this week. And In trade news, President Trump put tariffs on Canada, Mexico and the European Union Thursday. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.

The News Roundup For June 1, 2018

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Matthew Charles was told he didn't qualify for early release, even though he had already been released. JULIETA MARTINELLI/WPLN hide caption

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JULIETA MARTINELLI/WPLN

His Return To Prison Prompts Calls For Sentencing Reform

Matthew Charles was released early from prison in 2016, after serving 21 years of a 35-year sentence. But on May 14, he was sent back to prison. Federal officials said that Charles shouldn't have qualified for early release, even though he's been incarcerated for almost half his life. Now his case has gone viral — will it make a difference? | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.

His Return To Prison Prompts Calls For Sentencing Reform

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Members of a caravan of Central Americans who spent weeks traveling across Mexico walk from Mexico to the U.S. side of the border to ask authorities for asylum on April 29, 2018 in Tijuana, Baja California Norte. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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What You Need To Know About #Wherearethechildren In 13 Minutes

Have you seen the statistic about 1500 missing children? There's a lot of confusion across social media about the status of unaccompanied child migrants, children being separated from their parents, and President Trump's "zero tolerance" policy at the border. We get clarity from Maria Sacchetti, who covers immigration for The Washington Post. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1a and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.

What You Need To Know About #Wherearethechildren In 13 Minutes

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What Did Big Pharma Executives Know About The Opioid Crisis?

More than 115 Americans die every day from opioid overdoses in a drug crisis that's been going on for years. Journalist Barry Meier says it could have been thwarted early on. He alleges that top DOJ officials in the George W. Bush administration refused to support prosecutors who had built a case against the maker of OxyContin. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.

What Did Big Pharma Executives Know About The Opioid Crisis?

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Take Me On: The Art Of The Cover Song

While taking on another artist's hit can seem like an easy way to please fans, it can also be a risk. When done right, it's a beautiful tribute that can become a hit all its own. When done wrong, it can be the pop equivalent of dancing on a grave. Enjoy this remix of one of our favorite shows. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Take Me On: The Art Of The Cover Song

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A commemorative coin for the planned U.S.-North Korea summit. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

The News Roundup For May 25, 2018

This week, President Trump canceled a planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the NFL said all athletes and staff must stand for the national anthem if they are on the field and Ireland voted on the repeal of their Eighth Amendment, which bans almost all types of abortion. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

The News Roundup For May 25, 2018

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The Dollar General in Moville, Iowa, is a stone's throw from the only grocery store in town. Though the grocery has produce and fresh meats, it can't compete with Dollar General on other items. Frank Morris/NPR hide caption

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Frank Morris/NPR

The Billion-Dollar Discount Chain: Dollar General And Rural America

There are more than 13,000 Dollar General stores in the United States, which is roughly equal to Starbucks and almost double the number of Walmarts. The chain has found a profitable market outside of cities and in many of these places, Dollar General is the easiest and most affordable store for essential goods. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

The Billion-Dollar Discount Chain: Dollar General And Rural America

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Clapper said that by fall 2016, the intelligence realized that the Russians were running an enormous scheme that was "unprecedented, aggressive, multifaceted," he writes in his new book. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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James Clapper On Russia, North Korea And Life In Intelligence Operations

"I would argue that [Russian meddling in 2016] had profound impact and probably turned the election," former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said. We talked to him about current events and his new book, which reflects on five decades of his career in intelligence operations. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

James Clapper On Russia, North Korea And Life In Intelligence Operations

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Even public radio producers wear sneakers to work. Gabe Bullard/1A/WAMU hide caption

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Gabe Bullard/1A/WAMU

What Are Those? How Sneakers Conquered America's Feet

Whether you call them sneakers, joggers, or something else (sand shoes?), there's no denying the popularity of athletic footwear. With more than $30 billion in sales a year, it's clear not everyone who buys a fresh pair is playing sports. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

What Are Those? How Sneakers Conquered America's Feet

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Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Franchesca Ramsey. Hari Kondabolu photo by Mindy Tucker, Franchesca Ramsey photo by Erin Patrice O'Brien/Photographer hide caption

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Hari Kondabolu photo by Mindy Tucker, Franchesca Ramsey photo by Erin Patrice O'Brien/Photographer

Comedy For Social Change

Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Franchesca Ramsey want to make you laugh, but they also want to make you think and take action toward changing the world. Both have new projects: Kondabolu co-hosts a podcast called "Kondabolu Brothers" and Ramsey has a book out now called, "Well, That Escalated Quickly." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

Comedy For Social Change

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President Donald Trump listens during a roundtable on immigration policy in California, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, on Wednesday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The News Roundup For May 18, 2018

This week we learned how the crossfire hurricane was born. That's the codename given to the Russia investigation. At the UN, Ambassador Nikki Haley blamed Hamas for violence surrounding the relocation of a U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, before walking out of the meeting as a Palestinian envoy spoke. And Kim Jong Un may walk away from a planned meeting with President Trump. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.

The News Roundup For May 18, 2018

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