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1A is home to the national conversation. The show frames the best debates with great guests in ways to make you think, share and engage.

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Alvin Hall is the host of "Driving the Green Book," a new podcast from MacMillan. The show details the stories of African Americans who used The Green Book as a resource for protection and empowerment. MacMillan hide caption

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MacMillan

1A Presents...'Driving The Green Book'

We're sharing the first episode of a new show called "Driving The Green Book," produced by Macmillan Podcasts and hosted by journalist and educator Alvin Hall.

1A Presents...'Driving The Green Book'

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U.S. President Donald Trump and Prime Minister of Israel Benjamin Netanyahu participate in a meeting in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC. Pool/Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

The News Roundup for September 18, 2020

Wildfires and hurricanes continue to affect large swaths of the US. COVID infections top 30 million globally, as the work on a vaccine continues. President Trump and Prime Minister Netanyahu celebrate a peace deal for Israel, and scientists search for life on Venus.

The News Roundup for September 18, 2020

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We take a look at the data regarding about crime during the pandemic. Scott Olson/Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Scott Olson/Getty Images

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Crime

Some will tell you crime in America has gone up. Others say it's down. But it depends on the type of crime.

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Is Affecting Crime

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Go vote? Almost 100 million eligible Americans didn't in 2016. Brett Carlsen/Brett Carlsen/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Carlsen/Brett Carlsen/Getty Images

Why Millions Of Eligible Americans Don't Vote

1A listener George told us, "My vote doesn't really matter[...]Six states are getting virtually all of the attention and all of the campaign dollars are going to those states."

Why Millions Of Eligible Americans Don't Vote

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Plaques that form part of the Benin Bronzes are displayed at The British Museum in London. The Bronzes were stolen from the African country of Benin by British troops in 1897. Dan Kitwood/Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Museums Are Filled With Stolen African Art. Is It Time To Return It?

"Part of the reason the Benin royal art is so much at the forefront of this conversation is because it's one of the best documented examples of colonial appropriation," says Chika Okeke-Agulu, professor of African art at Princeton.

Museums Are Filled With Stolen African Art. Is It Time To Return It?

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A still from the quarantine horror film "Host." Host hide caption

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Host

The 1A Movie Club Watches 'Quarantine Horror'

"The thing that you're always looking to do in horror is to make the audience feel like they're participating," says "Host" director Rob Savage.

The 1A Movie Club Watches 'Quarantine Horror'

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A man walks past a poster for the Disney movie 'Mulan' at a bus stop in Beijing. GREG BAKER/GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GREG BAKER/GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images

The News Roundup For September 11, 2020

Wildfires continue to rage in the Western U.S. The race for a COVID-19 vaccine faces some setbacks. Disney is criticized for filming parts of Mulan in the Chinese province of Xinjiang. The Taliban and the Afghan government open negotiations.

The News Roundup For September 11, 2020

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Students wait in line for registration and an identifying wristband after receiving a negative test result for coronavirus while arriving on campus at Colorado University in Boulder, Colorado. Mark Makela/Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Mark Makela/Getty Images

Can Colleges And Universities Survive The Pandemic?

Many schools that were financially stressed going into the pandemic might not come out of it, says Fred Lawrence, CEO of the Phi Beta Kappa Society.

Can Colleges And Universities Survive The Pandemic?

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'The End of Everything (Astrophysically Speaking)' by Katie Mack. Katie Mack hide caption

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Katie Mack

How Everything Will End, According To A Cosmologist

"I think there is a morbid fascination in thinking of how everything will fall apart," says cosmologist Katie Mack. "But you can contemplate how we fit into this bigger picture, and that can be a really comforting thought."

How Everything Will End, According To A Cosmologist

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Journalist Tom Burgis follows how dirty money circles the globe. His latest book is "Kleptopia: How Dirty Money Is Conquering the World." Charlie Bibby/Charlie Bibby hide caption

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Charlie Bibby/Charlie Bibby

Dirty Money, 'Kleptopia' And World Leaders

"I have a few sleepless nights but the people who are far braver are my sources," says journalist Tom Burgis.

Dirty Money, 'Kleptopia' And World Leaders

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