It's Been a Minute Has it been a minute since you heard a thought-provoking conversation about culture? Brittany Luse wants to help. Each week, she takes the things everyone's talking about and, in conversation with her favorite creators, tastemakers, and experts, gives you new ways to think about them. Beyond the obvious takes. Because culture doesn't happen by accident.

If you can't get enough, try It's Been a Minute Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/itsbeenaminute

It's Been a Minute

From NPR

Has it been a minute since you heard a thought-provoking conversation about culture? Brittany Luse wants to help. Each week, she takes the things everyone's talking about and, in conversation with her favorite creators, tastemakers, and experts, gives you new ways to think about them. Beyond the obvious takes. Because culture doesn't happen by accident.

If you can't get enough, try It's Been a Minute Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/itsbeenaminute

Most Recent Episodes

Representatives Jasmine Crockett and Marjorie Taylor Greene. Jemal Countess; Drew Angerer/Getty Images; BFA / Warner Bros hide caption

toggle caption
Jemal Countess; Drew Angerer/Getty Images; BFA / Warner Bros

The Real Housewife-ification of Congress; And, 25 years of being pilled by The Matrix

Representatives Marjorie Taylor Greene and Jasmine Crockett exchanged heated words on the House floor. Greene commented on Crockett's eyelashes, and Crockett referred to Greene's body as "butch." We dive into the history of these two attacks, and look at what history the two representatives were pulling from — from misogynoir to transphobia. And what does this about what we want from our politicians?

The Real Housewife-ification of Congress; And, 25 years of being pilled by The Matrix

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956488/1253085672" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Somi Kakoma and Lakisha May in Jaja's African Hair Braiding on Broadway Matthew Murphy/Manhattan Theatre Club hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Murphy/Manhattan Theatre Club

Tony nominee Jocelyn Bioh puts braiders centerstage

This week, Brittany Luse sits down with playwright Jocelyn Bioh, whose new play, Jaja's African Hair Braiding, is up for five Tony Award nominations, including Best Play. The two discuss Bioh's unique approach to comedy, what it took to bring a hair affair to Broadway, and how to find humor in dark situations.

Tony nominee Jocelyn Bioh puts braiders centerstage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956483/1252601537" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bumble pickleball ad. COVID masks. Charley Gallay/Getty Images; Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Charley Gallay/Getty Images; Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

Bumble & the trap of modern dating; plus, living ethically in COVID's aftermath

This week, the dating app Bumble could not stay out of the news. First, the company launched an anti-celibacy advertising campaign mocking abstinence and suggesting women shouldn't give up on dating apps. Then, at a tech summit, Bumble's founder suggested artificial intelligence might be the future of dating. Both efforts were met with backlash, and during a time when everyone seems irritated with dating - where can people turn? Shani Silver, author of the Cheaper Than Therapy substack, and KCRW's Myisha Battle, dating coach and host of How's Your Sex Life? join the show to make sense of the mess.

Bumble & the trap of modern dating; plus, living ethically in COVID's aftermath

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956408/1251972568" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Author Miranda July poses next to her novel, "All Fours" Elizabeth Weinberg/Amazon hide caption

toggle caption
Elizabeth Weinberg/Amazon

The miracle of middle age with Miranda July

Our culture is full of stories about what it's like to be young: to find yourself, to fall in love, to leave home. But there aren't nearly as many scripts for what middle age might look like, especially for women. This week, host Brittany Luse is joined by author and filmmaker Miranda July, whose new novel 'All Fours' dives deep into the mystery and miracle of being a middle aged woman.

The miracle of middle age with Miranda July

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956401/1251381066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kendrick Lamar. Drake. A woman holding a child. Frazer Harrison; Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frazer Harrison; Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images

Drake and Kendrick are beefing, but who pays? Plus, moms as our social safety net

Drake and Kendrick have been trading diss tracks for weeks, and it's gotten darker and darker with each track. Drake accuses Kendrick of beating women, and Kendrick accuses Drake of abusing minors. It's a spectacle, but who are the pawns? Brittany chats with NPR Music's Sidney Madden and writer Tirhakah Love about the collateral damage in this rap beef.

Drake and Kendrick are beefing, but who pays? Plus, moms as our social safety net

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956376/1250550198" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

'Wild Card' host Rachel Martin NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

A 'Wild Card' game with Rachel Martin

NPR's Rachel Martin is the host of a new weekly podcast called Wild Card. It's part-interview, part-existential game show. In this episode, Brittany sits down to play the game with Rachel, which brings up some surprising emotions for the both of them.

A 'Wild Card' game with Rachel Martin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198005976/1250348862" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Justice Smith and Brigette Lundy-Paine. Courtesey A24 hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesey A24

Suburban decay and choking on nostalgia in 'I Saw The TV Glow'

Brittany sits down with Jane Schoenbrun, the director of A24's coming of age horror film, I Saw The TV Glow. Brittany and Jane discuss suburban decay, delightfully creepy kids shows, and new metaphors for the trans experience.

Suburban decay and choking on nostalgia in 'I Saw The TV Glow'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956382/1249710300" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pro-Palestinian encampment at Columbia University. Eurovision 2024. NIKITA PAYUSOV/Middle East Images/AFP via Getty Images; LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ/Belga/AFP via Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
NIKITA PAYUSOV/Middle East Images/AFP via Getty Images; LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ/Belga/AFP via Getty Images/Getty Images

An inside look at the campus protests; plus, Israel at Eurovision

Pro-Palestinian protests have been popping up at universities around the world, and in the last few days things have escalated at a number of those campuses. Columbia University called on police to shutdown the encampment on their university lawn and 300 people were arrested. At University of California Los Angeles, about 200 pro-Israel counter-protestors raided a pro-Palestinian encampment. To get first hand accounts of the protests, Brittany talks to two student journalists: Shaanth Nanguneri, an undergraduate reporter at UCLA, and Claire Davenport, a graduate reporter at Columbia University in New York.

An inside look at the campus protests; plus, Israel at Eurovision

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956355/1248862442" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Left: An Ebony Fashion Fair Model. Right: A hand holds up a copy of Ebony magazine in front of a Chicago skyline. (Photo by KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI/AFP via Getty Images)/ (Photo By Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images) hide caption

toggle caption
(Photo by KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI/AFP via Getty Images)/ (Photo By Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

How Chicago's Black press shaped America

Host Brittany Luse sits down with Arionne Nettles, author of We Are the Culture: Black Chicago's Influence on Everything. Arionne shares how Black media in Chicago influenced the way Black Americans see themselves and why the city deserves to be called 'the heart of Black America.'

How Chicago's Black press shaped America

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956358/1248226708" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People gather for a press conference about their opposition to a TikTok ban. A couple looking at a cake. Brendan Smialowski / AFP; George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski / AFP; George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images/Getty Images

TikTok gets the boot; plus, a 'tradwife' fantasy

This week, President Biden signed a law that could ban TikTok nationwide unless its Chinese parent company sells the media platform within a year. Brittany is joined by NPR's Deirdre Walsh and Bobby Allyn to discuss the backdrop of this decision and its implications.

TikTok gets the boot; plus, a 'tradwife' fantasy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1197956331/1247315096" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
or search npr.org